Technology: Scientists find human footprint in a mammoth track using 3D radar - - PressFrom - US
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Technology Scientists find human footprint in a mammoth track using 3D radar

00:05  12 november  2019
00:05  12 november  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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Ground-penetrating radar revealed this mammoth track with a human footprint on top. The scientists published a paper, " 3 - D radar imaging unlocks the untapped behavioral and biomechanical archive of Pleistocene ghost tracks ," in the journal Scientific Reports on Monday.

The researchers examined the footprints of humans , mammoths and giant sloths in the White Sands National Monument in New Mexico. The study, " 3 - D Radar Imaging Unlocks the Untapped Behavioral and Biomechanical Archive of Pleistocene Ghost Track ," published in Scientific Reports.

When you visit White Sands National Monument in New Mexico, you will witness endless waves of bright gypsum. It's beautiful, but a team of researchers led by scientists at Cornell University was more interested in what was hiding under the sand.

a person holding a snow board in the sand: A team led by Cornell University researchers used ground-penetrating radar to uncover 12,000-year-old tracks and footprints. Cornell University© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. A team led by Cornell University researchers used ground-penetrating radar to uncover 12,000-year-old tracks and footprints. Cornell University

The team used ground-penetrating radar, which has been used to discover more stones near Stonehenge, to investigate the movements of mammoths, humans and giant sloths from 12,000 years ago. These tracks are normally difficult to see unless conditions are perfect. The researchers refer to them as "ghost tracks."

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The researchers examined the footprints of humans , mammoths and giant sloths in the White 3 - D radar imaging unlocks the untapped behavioral and biomechanical archive of Pleistocene ghost May 26, 2016 — Using radar data scientists found evidence of an ice age recorded in the polar deposits

No human fossils have been found but the scientists from national museums and universities, who have been working at Happisburgh for a decade, believe they must be there and that there is a good chance more footprints will be exposed in a coastline crumbling on every tide – there has been 30

Ground-penetrating radar revealed this mammoth track with a human footprint on top. Thomas Urban/Matthew Bennett, et al.© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Ground-penetrating radar revealed this mammoth track with a human footprint on top. Thomas Urban/Matthew Bennett, et al.

The scientists published a paper, "3-D radar imaging unlocks the untapped behavioral and biomechanical archive of Pleistocene ghost tracks," in the journal Scientific Reports on Monday.

"We never thought to look under footprints," said lead author Thomas Urban in a Cornell release. "But it turns out that the sediment itself has a memory that records the effects of the animal's weight and momentum in a beautiful way. It gives us a way to understand the biomechanics of extinct fauna that we never had before."

a dog carrying a frisbee in the snow: A team led by Cornell researchers used ground-penetrating radar to uncover 12,000-year-old tracks and footprints.© Cornell University

A team led by Cornell researchers used ground-penetrating radar to uncover 12,000-year-old tracks and footprints.

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Sixteen years of change in the global human footprint . The web maps below allow you to compare the human footprint in 1993 and in 2009 and see what's changed.

Until now, scientists thought that the preserved ancient human footprints at Monte Verde, another archaeological site in Chile, were the oldest footprints in But those prints were about 1,100 years younger than the footprint found at the Pilauco site. Both the Monte Verde tracks and the Pilauco

The radar revealed a fascinating scene from the past consisting of a double trackway of human footprints stretching over 2,600 feet (800 meters). It showed the movements of what was likely a single person walking one way and then returning on roughly the same path. Mammoth tracks cross over the human tracks.

One of the mammoth tracks is special. It shows where a human stepped into the track later, leaving a telltale footprint behind. This gives researchers a rare glimpse into how humans and mega-fauna may have interacted all those years ago.

This study shows how ground-penetrating radar can reveal previously hidden secrets from the past, even ones as subtle as footprints. "The technique could possibly be applied to many other fossilized footprint sites around the world, potentially including those of dinosaurs," said Urban.

13 ancient mysteries unlocked by modern science

a bottle of water© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
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Researchers create lung 'blueprint' that could aid organ regeneration .
Serious lung disease has a high rate of mortality, and the only curative treatment is a lung transplant. This is a complicated procedure that has other adverse health effects and oftentimes simply doesn't work, so for scientists in this field, organ regeneration -- that is, growing an organ from the body's own tissue -- is the ultimate solution. Now, researchers from Yale say they're on track for this very eventuality. Using sophisticatedUsing sophisticated screening processes, the team has created a cellular blueprint of the human lung, making it easier to understand the design of lung function and respiratory diseases. The technology offers an ultrahigh resolution of millions of cells at once.

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