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Technology Here’s why Netflix is ditching old Roku devices: DRM

05:15  12 november  2019
05:15  12 november  2019 Source:   theverge.com

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Here ’ s what’s going on: Netflix has used Microsoft’s PlayReady DRM since 2010 so that it could more easily bring its streaming service to the loads of TVs, devices , and set top boxes you can find it on today while satisfying its content providers that their work wouldn’t get pirated.

However, the oldest Roku devices ( Roku SD, Roku HD, Roku HD-XR, Roku XD, and Roku XDS) and some old The technical limitation Netflix describes is the inability for these old devices to upgrade to using PlayReady, and after Dec. 1 that will be a requirement for Netflix streams to work.

Last week, Netflix announced that it was ending support for older devices from Samsung, Roku, and Vizio after December 1st, but it wasn’t clear exactly why those devices were losing support, besides the fact that they were old. And a Netflix support doc isn’t helpful, saying that the problem is due to “technical limitations.” But Netflix has shared a little more detail about those technical limitations on older Roku devices with Gizmodo, and it turns out the answer is quite simple: DRM.

a black and red text© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Here’s what’s going on: Netflix has used Microsoft’s PlayReady DRM since 2010 so that it could more easily bring its streaming service to the loads of TVs, devices, and set top boxes you can find it on today while satisfying its content providers that their work wouldn’t get pirated. But because Netflix had already shipped devices like the affected Rokus with an earlier form of deprecated Windows Media DRM, they would inevitably get left behind if Netflix ever cut ties with the old DRM standard and if those devices couldn’t be upgraded to the newer PlayReady instead. Now, it has — and they can’t.

It’s not clear from Gizmodo’s article why the older Samsung and Vizio devices won’t be able to use Netflix, but we wouldn’t be surprised if it’s the same reason. We’ve asked Netflix if that’s the case.

Roku app for Apple Watch can control your device from your wrist .
Roku is putting a remote control on your wrist -- the one that's wearing an Apple Watch, that is. The company's app is now out for Apple's wearable, and you only need to update your iOS app to version 6.1.3 to be able to get the free application. Like Roku's mobile apps, you can use the Watch application as a remote control for your device. You can launch channels, listed in order of most recently launched, on your TV by tapping on your Watch screen. And you can even control the volume with your Watch's circular crown.You can also use voice commands for specific requests, such as to launch certain apps ("Launch Hulu") or to look for shows to binge on ("search for comedies.

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