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Technology Facial recognition surveillance would require warrant under bipartisan bill

19:26  14 november  2019
19:26  14 november  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Research group says AI surveillance expanding worldwide

Research group says AI surveillance expanding worldwide WASHINGTON (AP) — A research group says a growing number of countries are following China's lead in deploying artificial intelligence to track citizens. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace says at least 75 countries are actively using AI tools such as facial recognition for surveillance. The list of countries where some form of AI surveillance is used includes liberal democracies such as the United States and France as well as more autocratic regimes. Tuesday's report from the group says Chinese tech companies led by Huawei are supplying much of the AI surveillance to countries around the world. Other companies such as Japan's NEC Corporation and U.S.

The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act was introduced by Sen. "This bipartisan bill strikes the right balance by making sure law enforcement has the tools necessary to keep us The proposed legislation would also require any use of facial recognition to minimize the amount of data

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Two senators introduced a bill Thursday to limit how federal law enforcement agencies can use facial recognition technology. Lawmakers have looked at the technology as a bipartisan concern, raising issues with surveillance, privacy and civil liberties surrounding facial recognition.

a close up of a white brick wall: The bipartisan bill would limit how federal agencies can use facial recognition. James Martin/CNET© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. The bipartisan bill would limit how federal agencies can use facial recognition. James Martin/CNET

The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act was introduced by Sen. Chris Coons, a Democrat from Delaware, and Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah. The bill calls for federal agencies like the FBI and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to obtain a warrant if they want to use facial recognition for ongoing surveillance, like tracking a person's whereabouts for longer than 72 hours.

California's new police body cam law blocks the use of facial recognition

  California's new police body cam law blocks the use of facial recognition In August, backers of California's Body Camera Accountability Act pointed out a test of facial recognition software that identified 26 state lawmakers as criminals. They argued it showed the flaws of such technology, and now Governor Gavin Newsom has signed AB1215 into law, preventing law enforcement in the state from "installing, activating, or using any biometric surveillance system in connection with an officer camera or data collected by an officer camera" through 2023.The bill's sponsor, Phil Ting said of facial recognition tech, "It's not ready for prime time, as it falsely matches innocent people with mugshots, including me.

The bipartisan Commercial Facial Recognition Privacy Act is sponsored by Senators Brian Schatz (D-HI) and Roy Blunt (R-MO) and is the first of its kind Under the bill , users would need to be notified whenever their FR data is used or collected. According to the lawmakers, it also would require

The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act would require law enforcement agencies to prove probable cause and obtain a warrant before using facial recognition systems to surveil suspects, mirroring the legal procedures used to authorize other intrusive activities like cell phone searches

a close up of a white wall: The bipartisan bill would limit how federal agencies can use facial recognition.© CNET

The bipartisan bill would limit how federal agencies can use facial recognition.

"Right now, there is a lack of uniformity when it comes to how, when, and where the federal government deploys facial recognition technology," Coons said in a statement. "This bipartisan bill strikes the right balance by making sure law enforcement has the tools necessary to keep us safe while also protecting fundamental Fourth Amendment privacy rights."

The proposed legislation would also require any use of facial recognition to minimize the amount of data collected about people. Federal government use of facial recognition is mostly unregulated, which has allowed US agencies to amass a database of people's images.

Berkeley Becomes Fourth U.S. City to Ban Face Recognition in Unanimous Vote

  Berkeley Becomes Fourth U.S. City to Ban Face Recognition in Unanimous Vote Berkeley, California became the fourth U.S. city to pass a ban on all government use of facial recognition technology on Tuesday night following a unanimous yes vote by the City Council. © Photo: GettyCongratulations to the people of Berkeley, CA. You showed up, you wrote in, and your City Council heard you. Berkeley’s City Council has voted unanimously to ban government use of face surveillance.

Facial recognition surveillance would require warrant under bipartisan bill . The probe reflects growing unease about facial recognition surveillance in the United States and elsewhere that civil liberties groups say could lead to unfair arrests and limit freedom of expression.

The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act, introduced last week by Sen. Chris Coons and Sen. Mike Lee, would require a warrant to use # facialrecognition surveillance . Facial recognition surveillance would require warrant under bipartisan bill .

The FBI has one of the largest facial recognition databases, with more than 641 million images of US citizens collected from driver's licenses and passports. This database is often accessed by law enforcement, without a warrant or any probable cause.

ICE has also been scanning millions of Americans' license photos for facial recognition searches.

"Facial recognition technology can be a powerful tool for law enforcement officials," Lee said in a statement. "But it's very power also makes it ripe for abuse. That is why American citizens deserve protection from facial recognition abuse."

The bill introduced Thursday wouldn't stop the use of facial recognition for identification purposes, which is how ICE and the FBI have been tapping the tech in several cases. The proposed legislation would specifically require a warrant to use facial recognition to follow a person around.

ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition

  ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition The ACLU is unsurprisingly concerned about the FBI's use of facial recognition, and it wants to force the agency to divulge its practices. It just filed a lawsuit against the FBI, the Justice Department and the DEA ordering them to turn over records showing "when, where and how" they use facial recognition tech. The civil liberties group was concerned that these systems could "fundamentally alter" society and lead to constant surveillance, and pointed to the FBI's history and public stances as reasons to be concerned.The FBI has engaged in "political policing," the ACLU said, including spying on peaceful activists.

facial recognition surveillance . Russia Uses Biometric Surveillance to Enforce COVID-19 Quarantine. Democratic junior senator Chris Coons (D-Delaware) is cosponsoring a bipartisan piece of legislation that aims to regulate the use of facial recognition technology on the federal level.

What is facial recognition - and how sinister is it? The standalone system for law enforcement requires a person to manually submit a person’s image and resolve against possible matches But should it become “technically possible” under the legislation, the minister could set the rules to allow it.

It would also apply only to federal agencies, so local police departments would still be able to use facial recognition if the bill becomes law. Local lawmakers have taken facial recognition regulations into their own hands, with cities like San Francisco, Oakland, California, and Somerville, Massachusetts banning government use of the technology.

The bill was introduced the same day that Fight for the Future activists took to the streets of Washington, DC, to scan the faces of passersby as a way of demonstrating the lack of facial recognition laws.

The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act isn't the only federal legislation proposed on limiting facial recognition. In March, two US senators introduced a bill to prevent businesses from using facial recognition without customers' consent. A group of lawmakers also introduced legislation in July to prevent facial recognition from being used in public housing.

You can read a copy of the Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act here:

Massive errors found in facial recognition tech: US study .
Facial recognition systems can produce wildly inaccurate results, especially for non-whites, according to a US government study released Thursday that is likely to raise fresh doubts on deployment of the artificial intelligence technology. The study of dozens of facial recognition algorithms showed "false positives" rates for Asian and African American as much as 100 times higher than for whites. The researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a government research center, also found two algorithms assigned the wrong gender to black females almost 35 percent of the time.

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