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Technology The NSA has stopped collecting location data from US cellphones without a warrant

23:40  14 november  2019
23:40  14 november  2019 Source:   theverge.com

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American intelligence agencies quietly stopped the warrantless collection of US phone location data last year In a response to Wyden released today, a representative for the office said intelligence agencies have already stopped the practice of collecting US location data without a warrant .

Where the NSA has no specific information on a person's location , analysts are free to presume The NSA is empowered to retain data for up to five years and the policy states "communications The NSA 's ability to collect and retain the communications of people in the US , even without a warrant

American intelligence agencies quietly stopped the warrantless collection of US phone location data last year, according to a letter from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence released today.

a view of a city at night

Last year, in a landmark decision, the Supreme Court ruled against authorities looking to search through electronic location data without a warrant. Citing the ruling, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), a privacy hawk in Congress, wrote a letter to then-Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats asking how agencies like the National Security Agency would apply the court’s decision.

In a response to Wyden released today, a representative for the office said intelligence agencies have already stopped the practice of collecting US location data without a warrant. Previously, agencies collected that information through surveillance powers granted under the Patriot Act. But since the Supreme Court’s decision, the agencies have stopped the practice, and they now back up those searches through a warrant, under the legal standard of probable cause.

The NSA says it stopped tracking cellphone locations without a warrant

  The NSA says it stopped tracking cellphone locations without a warrant Last year the Supreme Court ruled, in a 5-4 decision, that a search warrant is required for law enforcement to perform cellphone tower searches to track someone's location. The Daily Beast reported on a letter sent by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) to Senator Ron Wyden affirming that ever since that Carpenter decision, the "Intelligence community" has not sought cell-site location data or GPS records without a warrant. It had been doing that, claiming authority under the Title V of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) / Section 215 of the Patriot Act.

The National Security Agency is currently collecting the telephone records of millions of US customers of Verizon, one of America's Under the Bush administration, officials in security agencies had disclosed to reporters the large-scale collection of call records data by the NSA , but this is the

" The NSA 's attempt to collect this data shows the need for stronger legislative oversight of the agency 's activities, but the fact is that federal, state , and local law enforcement are already regularly collecting cell phone location information without a warrant ," said Christopher Calabrese, ACLU

In the letter to Wyden, the intelligence community official writes that the Supreme Court’s decision presented “significant constitutional and statutory issues,” but would not explicitly rule out using the tools in the future. The letter says that “neither the Department of Justice nor the Intelligence Community has reached a legal conclusion” on the matter.

Next month, provisions of the Patriot Act — specifically, Section 215 — are set to expire, raising questions about potential reforms. “Now that Congress is considering reauthorizing Section 215, it needs to write a prohibition on warrantless geolocation collection into black-letter law,” Wyden said in a statement. “As the past year has shown, Americans don’t need to choose between liberty and security — Congress should reform Section 215 to ensure we have both.”

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SHELTON — Police said they arrested 26-year-old Carl Roberts, a man they said was wanted by police in Pennsylvania facing multiple charges including weapons of mass destruction. Shelton Police said they received a tip that Roberts was staying in a home in Shelton. Police were able to find him and took him into custody without incident on December 31st. Roberts was wanted out of Sugarcreek, Pennsylvania, on charges of weapons of mass destruction, risking catastrophe, and recklessly endangering another person.According to Sugarcreek Police, they were executing a search warrant on December 10th at a home, initially for controlled substances.

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