Technology: Most Americans want data privacy regulations. Few think it will happen - - PressFrom - US
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Technology Most Americans want data privacy regulations. Few think it will happen

19:25  15 november  2019
19:25  15 november  2019 Source:   cnn.com

Senator Wyden pushes his ‘Mind Your Own Business’ privacy act forward

  Senator Wyden pushes his ‘Mind Your Own Business’ privacy act forward Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) is advancing his data privacy bill. Today, he shared his "Mind Your Own Business Act" an official version of the draft legislation we saw last year. Like the draft, the official version would give the Federal Trade Commission more power, like the ability to fine tech companies for user privacy violations. As The Verge reports, the bill would allow the FTC to set minimum privacy and cybersecurity standards for tech companies, issue fines up to four percent of a company's annual revenue and make it a crime for senior execs to lie to the agency regarding privacy issues.

National regulators across Europe will be charged with policing the regulations , but many have woefully fewer resources than the companies Even if Europe persuades other countries to adopt its policies, it will be hard to ensure the laws work, said Omer Tene, a vice president at the International

With more and more data leaks being reported on, it was only a matter of time before Americans demanded more privacy regulation . A massive 73 percent of participants were more worried about data privacy than they were a few years ago. Identity theft was the primary worry, but financial fraud

Consumers are overwhelmingly pleading for the government's help in the face of an ever-growing list of corporate data breaches and privacy mishaps — but few have faith help will ever arrive.

a close up of a person using a cell phone: TOKYO, JAPAN - NOVEMBER 03:  A customer tries an iPhone X at the Apple Omotesando store on November 3, 2017 in Tokyo, Japan. Apple launched the latest iPhone featuring face recognition technology, a large 5.8-inch edge-to-edge high resolution OLED display and better front and back cameras with optical image stabilisation today. (Photo by Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images)© Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images TOKYO, JAPAN - NOVEMBER 03: A customer tries an iPhone X at the Apple Omotesando store on November 3, 2017 in Tokyo, Japan. Apple launched the latest iPhone featuring face recognition technology, a large 5.8-inch edge-to-edge high resolution OLED display and better front and back cameras with optical image stabilisation today. (Photo by Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images)

A full 75% of Americans say there should be more government regulation of consumer data and how businesses may use that information, according to a study published Friday by the Pew Research Center. The figure reflects the views of as many as 7 in 10 Republicans, and more than 8 in 10 Democrats.

Ron Wyden wants Facebook to ‘mind your own business’ with new privacy bill

  Ron Wyden wants Facebook to ‘mind your own business’ with new privacy bill Okay, it’s a pretty clever nameWyden’s “Mind Your Own Business Act” is the official version of a draft bill he circulated around to other members and consumer groups late last year. The legislation would empower the Federal Trade Commission with new authorities to fine tech companies that violate user privacy and bolster the agency with more resources to better regulate the industry in the future.

Of more than 2,500 people surveyed, 83% thought regulation was needed – and 62% believed it was on the way within the next few years. But there was less belief in the US government’s ability to go head-to-head with the tech giants: only 38% thought it was capable of effective measures.

Only one in four Americans (26 percent) think government should strictly limit the use of facial And just 24 percent want strict limits if it would prevent stores from using the technology to stop There were some differences in these opinions based on age, with older Americans more likely to oppose

The widespread support for government action underscores consumers' growing frustration with a largely unregulated data marketplace, and a digital economy that critics say often values profits over privacy.

As businesses increasingly scavenge for insights on consumers' shopping preferences, entertainment habits and even their bodily functions, the Pew study highlights how many Americans feel they've lost control over their own personal information. Seventy-nine percent of Americans say they aren't confident companies will take responsibility when they misuse consumer data, and three out of four Americans told Pew they are not confident that companies' mistakes will be held accountable by the government.

Apple is now presenting its privacy policy as if it were another product

  Apple is now presenting its privacy policy as if it were another product It's not uncommon for users to skip reading an app's privacy policy because it's too long and jumbled. Apparently, Apple wants to change that. Today, it released a new privacy page that makes its privacy policy easier to read and understand. The new privacy page looks more like a product page than your standard screen of black and white text. The refreshed apple.com/privacy page uses just a few words to describe how each app protects your privacy. If you want to know more, you can click the + icon and you'll get a two-paragraph explanation.

Also: Congress considers a national standard for data privacy . "No one knows what the next law will be or whether it will be a state, federal or even global one, but it "Every major breach I can think of was a company that was compliant to some standard," he said. "Taking a few extra steps in the process

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) means that businesses will need to be much clearer about the information they hold on people and give A Bristows client in Reno, Nevada that managed aftercare for people who had bought laptops thought it would be exempt from the rules , until one of

"There's a sense that companies are not necessarily the best stewards of the data," said Lee Rainie, Pew's director of internet and technology research and the author of Friday's report, in an interview. "I think it's pretty clear that the public is not convinced the government is doing all it can and should."

Some notable incidents that likely contributed to that perception, said Rainie, include the 2013 disclosures about government surveillance by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden and Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal.

The nation's top privacy watchdog, the Federal Trade Commission, has sought to make the issue a priority. Beginning in the Obama administration, the FTC published reports on commercial data brokers like Equifax and prosecuted a number of high-profile data breaches. This year, the FTC entered into a $5 billion settlement with Facebook over privacy breaches and a $170 million settlement with YouTube over alleged privacy violations.

California proposes new rules to enforce state privacy law

  California proposes new rules to enforce state privacy law California proposes new rules to enforce state privacy lawCalifornia Attorney General Xavier Becerra detailed the draft regulations for the state's new privacy law, due to take effect Jan. 1, which he said will allow people to "pull the curtains back" on information companies have collected on them.

The latest data are from Gallup's annual Governance survey, conducted Sept. Given that these trends stretch back to 2001 and there are data for only one Republican and one Democratic The majority of Democrats who don't think there is too much regulation are split between the "about

A few mention the cause of the sudden influx: the General Data Protection Regulation , a The law promises gains in over-all information hygiene: it will now be difficult for any large data operation not The provision is carefully safeguarded, because, as Reding notes, “what we do not want in Europe is

But despite the record-breaking amounts of some of those financial penalties, critics of the government — including lawmakers and some within the FTC itself — have said it isn't doing enough. Rohit Chopra and Rebecca Slaughter, two of the FTC's Democratic commissioners, have said the Facebook settlement should have held company executives personally liable. US senators including Missouri Republican Josh Hawley and Connecticut Democratic Richard Blumenthal have criticized the $5 billion penalty as little more than a slap on the wrist for Facebook.

In a House hearing this week, FTC Chairman Joseph Simons said the agency has done as much as it could with the legal tools at its disposal. The FTC lacks the power to do what European regulators can to hold businesses accountable, he said, or what California officials will be able to do under the state's new privacy law beginning next year. The California Consumer Privacy Act, or CCPA, takes effect Jan. 1.

"On the privacy side, we have a 100-year-old statute that was not in any way designed to anticipate the privacy issues we face today," Simons said in the hearing. "My predecessors at the FTC did an amazing job inventing, essentially out of whole cloth, a privacy regime that is the most aggressive in the world. So I think if you want us to do more on the privacy front, then we need help from you."

Senate Democrats propose sweeping data privacy bill

  Senate Democrats propose sweeping data privacy bill WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats are proposing a broad federal data privacy law that would allow people to see what information companies have collected on them and demand that it be deleted. But the bill is likely to face bipartisan challenges in the Republican-controlled Senate. Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington is leading the effort. The bill, called the Consumer Online Privacy Rights Act, is similar to one set to take effect in California in January. But the federal bill would largely leave that and other state laws in place — a move that is certain to face opposition from the technology industry, which has been calling for a single federal data privacy law.

Most people — Trump’s base excluded — don’t want the wall, don’t think the wall will happen From that same poll: Even fewer Americans actually want the wall. About 3 in 10 respondents say It ’s not clear from the polling why people think it ’s unlikely that Congress will budget funding for the wall.

Image. Credit James Steinberg. On Aug. 1, New Jersey will become the eighth state to allow doctors to prescribe lethal medication to terminally ill patients who want to end their lives. On Sept. 15, Maine will become the ninth.

In a statement addressing the Pew study, the FTC said: "This supports our recommendation that Congress enact new federal privacy legislation that would give us additional tools to protect consumers from misuse of their data."

Despite the sweeping support for tackling this issue from consumers, lawmakers have struggled to craft a bipartisan bill this year to address privacy and data. The key roadblocks include a dispute over how far a federal bill should go in overriding state privacy laws, and whether private citizens and groups should be allowed to sue companies for privacy violations.

Some House lawmakers are pushing forward anyway. Last week, California Democratic Reps. Zoe Lofgren and Anna Eshoo introduced a bill that would clarify Americans' rights over their data and establish a new, federal-level digital privacy regulator. The bill was welcomed by privacy and consumer advocates. But it includes a provision on private lawsuits that is unlikely to pass muster with Republicans in the Senate.

In light of the gridlock, some experts say Americans' frustration with the federal government is understandable.

"Consumers are right to be skeptical," said Margot Kaminsky, an associate law professor at the University of Colorado who studies privacy issues. But, she added, consumers should expect "a wave" of lawmaking at the state level. States including Texas, Connecticut and Hawaii have established task forces to study the CCPA as it goes into effect — a potential prelude to their own attempts at legislation.

"The concerns reflected in the Pew study are having a noticeable impact on the ground in state politics," she said. "States are stepping in as consumer protectors in privacy law, just as they are in a variety of other spaces."

Most Americans don't think it's possible to keep their data private, report says .
More than 60 percent of US adults believe it's impossible to go one day without a company or the government collecting data from them, Pew Research Center reports.The report showed that 81% of adults said they think that the risks of widespread data collection outweigh the benefits. In addition, a majority of Americans said they're concerned with how their data is potentially being used by companies and the government. More than 80% of those surveyed said they felt a lack of control over their data. More than half said they understand very little about data collection and use.

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