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Technology TikTok begins testing links in bios

00:05  16 november  2019
00:05  16 november  2019 Source:   theverge.com

TikTok opts out of paid political advertising entirely

  TikTok opts out of paid political advertising entirely While other social networks grapple with complex issues of political speech, growing video platform TikTokhas decided not to allow political ads of any kind. We'll have to see how that ban works in practice, as the company's list of disallowed material includes "paid ads that promote or oppose a candidate, current leader, political party or group, or issue at the federal, state, or local level – including election-related ads, advocacy ads, or issue ads."The Beijing-based app said in a statement that "the nature" of political ads don't fit its experience.

TikTok now has more than a billion users on its platform, and it appears the company is now experimenting with new ways for it and its users to Recently, TikTok has begun rolling out a feature that lets users add links to their bios and posts, which can direct audiences to products or services

TikTok is beginning to dabble in social commerce. TikTok is beginning to dabble in social commerce. The short-form video app said it has started to allow some users to add links to e-commerce sites (or any other destination) to their profile biography as well as offer creators the ability

TikTok has more than a billion users on its platform, and it appears the company is now experimenting with ways for it and its users to monetize their audiences on the app. Recently, TikTok has begun a limited test of a feature that lets users add links to their bios and posts, which can direct audiences to products or services. Judging by a video of the service in action posted by Fabian Bern, a marketer, it looks like audiences can purchase products featured in videos directly from the videos themselves.

a close up of a wire fence© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Influencers make their money from their audiences, and TikTok making that process more seamless almost certainly means those power users are going to see — and use — the service differently. Currently, the only way to make money on TikTok is to do brand deals off-platform.

TikTok turns its back on political ads

  TikTok turns its back on political ads Youth-friendly TikTok on Friday said it won't allow political ads because they would clash with the "light-hearted" feeling at the social network where people share playful video snippets. TikTok, which is owned by Chinese firm ByteDance, is dabbling with paid advertising at the service, which has proven a hit with teenagers, vice president of global business solutions Blake Chandlee said in an online post. "We're intent on always staying true to why users uniquely love the TikTok platform itself: for the app's light-hearted and irreverent feeling that makes it such a fun place to spend time," Chandlee said.

TikTok embraces e-commerce in test that lets high-profile users push shops and products in their posts New features let users link to to third-party sites like online shops Tools can be used in bios and also in posts to for an easy re-direct allow users to click on a link in a video or bio which then re-directs them to a third-party

BREAKING: TikTok launches ' link in bio ' & 'social commerce URLS' in videos @MattNavarra @TaylorLorenz @sarahintampa @TechCrunch @thenextweb TikTok has confirmed to AdWeek that it is indeed testing both of these options, but there are no solid plans for an official rollout as yet.

Right now the most direct comparison is Instagram. That app, which is owned by Facebook, currently allows users to purchase products featured in influencers’ posts and stories; it also is the originator of the phrase “link in bio,” which — well, you know what it means.

That TikTok is getting into the game is an important signal for its ambitions, at least in the US, where this test has been rolling out. If it becomes super easy to make money on TikTok, we’ll see more creators flocking toward the site. Which is a good thing. Because Vine is dead.

TikTok report says China didn't request user info in the first half of 2019 .
In its first-ever transparency report, TikTok claims it didn't receive any user information requests from the Chinese government in the first half of 2019. Instead, the majority of both legal and government-related requests came from India. In all, TikTok says it fielded 107 legal requests related to 143 Indian accounts, and provided authorities with user information in 47 percent of cases. Following India, TikTok received the most user information requests from American authorities. In the US, it got 79 requests related to 255 accounts, and went on to share information in 86 percent of cases. In third was Japan, where authorities requested information 35 times.

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