Technology: US again extends limited reprieve on tech sales to Huawei - - PressFrom - US
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Technology US again extends limited reprieve on tech sales to Huawei

22:35  18 november  2019
22:35  18 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

Report: US plans to allow some technology sales to Huawei

  Report: US plans to allow some technology sales to Huawei NEW YORK (AP) — The Trump administration plans to issue licenses to U.S. companies to supply "nonsensitive goods" to Chinese tech giant Huawei, The New York Times reported, in a move that might help to cool tensions ahead of trade talks. President Donald Trump gave approval last week to begin issuing licenses, the Times said Wednesday. It cited unidentified people familiar with the matter and gave no indication what technologies might be covered. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Sanctions announced in May require U.S.

The Trump administration has extended for 90 more days a limited reprieve on U.S. technology sales to Huawei.

FILE - In this July 30, 2019, file photo a woman walks by a Huawei retail store in Beijing. The Trump administration has extended for 90 more days a limited reprieve on U.S. technology sales to the Chinese technology giant Huawei. The U.S. government blacklisted Huawei in May, deeming it a national security risk so U.S. firms aren't allow to sell the company technology without government approval. But numerous loopholes have been exploited, including by U.S. semiconductor suppliers. And the administration says it’s preparing to grand some exemptions.  (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this July 30, 2019, file photo a woman walks by a Huawei retail store in Beijing. The Trump administration has extended for 90 more days a limited reprieve on U.S. technology sales to the Chinese technology giant Huawei. The U.S. government blacklisted Huawei in May, deeming it a national security risk so U.S. firms aren't allow to sell the company technology without government approval. But numerous loopholes have been exploited, including by U.S. semiconductor suppliers. And the administration says it’s preparing to grand some exemptions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

The U.S. government blacklisted the Chinese tech company in May, deeming it a national security risk. That means U.S. firms aren't allowed to sell technology to Huawei without government approval.

China's Huawei reports sales gain despite US sanctions

  China's Huawei reports sales gain despite US sanctions BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei on Wednesday reported a double-digit gain in sales despite U.S. sanctions that threaten to disrupt its smartphone and network equipment businesses. Huawei Technologies Ltd. said its sales rose 24.4% in the first nine months of 2019 to 610.8 billion yuan ($86 billion). That was faster than the 23.2% gain reported for the first half. The announcement followed U.S.-Chinese trade talks in Washington that ended Friday with no word of progress on resolving Huawei's status.The Trump administration, which accuses Huawei of being a security risk, imposed curbs in May on its access to U.S.

The limited reprieve renewed Monday applies to technology sales and transfers necessary for existing networks and services to continue to operate. It was not unexpected and represents the second such extension.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said the extension will allow wireless companies to keep offering service in remote parts of the U.S. Larger U.S. wireless companies do not use equipment from Huawei, while smaller, rural carriers do.

Despite sanctions, numerous loopholes have been exploited. U.S. companies, for example, continue to supply Huawei with chips made outside the United States. Nor do the sanctions bar U.S. telecoms from buying Huawei equipment — though the Federal Communications Commission is moving toward banning federal subsidies for such purchases.

Huawei exec: Chinese tech giant wants to be 'transparent'

  Huawei exec: Chinese tech giant wants to be 'transparent' WASHINGTON (AP) — A top executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei says the company wants to be open and transparent in persuading the U.S. government that national security concerns about its technology are unfounded. Paul Scanlan is a chief technology officer at Huawei. He told The Associated Press in an interview Friday that the company is looking to "demystify" itself to skeptical U.S. authorities and is prepared to invite American officials to review Huawei product themselves to address any concerns.The Trump administration accuses Huawei of being a security risk. It imposed curbs in May on the company's access to U.S.

President Donald Trump has sent mixed signals on Huawei, enmeshing it in the trade war between Washington and Beijing and showing a willingness to use the sanctions as a bargaining chip.

Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer decried that strategy.

“If President Trump and his Commerce Department agree that Huawei is a national security threat, they should start acting like it,” he said in a statement. “Every day President Trump is soft on Huawei, the Chinese Communist Party takes that as a signal that they can continue hurting American jobs and threatening our national security without any repercussions.”

Earlier this month, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told Bloomberg that his agency had received 260 requests for licenses from U.S. companies to be exempt from the so-called “entity list” sanctions. Ross said “quite a few” would soon be granted. Such an exemption would not dependent on 90-day renewals.

Huawei is the biggest global maker of network gear for phone and internet companies and the No. 2 smartphone brand. The company denies U.S. accusations that it is a security risk and might facilitate Chinese spying. Indeed, U.S. officials have not provided any evidence that Huawei has knowingly assisted Beijing in its cyberespionage operations.

The sanctions’ biggest impact may be on Google's Android mobile operating system, which Huawei can no longer use in its smartphones.

Huawei has developed its own operating system as a replacement.

Huawei is reportedly planning to sue over latest FCC restrictions .
The saga of Huawei vs. the US continues, and the latest chapter sees the Chinese electronics giant gearing up to take on the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC approved an order last week that would ban carriers receiving Universal Service Fund subsidies from using that money to buy equipment from companies considered "a national security threat" -- referring to Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE. Huawei slammed this action as "unlawful"The two electronics companies are among the top entities that the Commission sees as threats, with regulators repeatedly citing concerns over spying as the reason for their vigilance.

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