Technology: Amazon says it’s considered face scanning in Ring doorbells - - PressFrom - US
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Technology Amazon says it’s considered face scanning in Ring doorbells

04:06  20 november  2019
04:06  20 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

Amazon announces new 'Home Mode' privacy feature for Ring doorbells

  Amazon announces new 'Home Mode' privacy feature for Ring doorbells If toggled, the video doorbells won't record when owners are home.The feature, which Amazon's hardware chief David Limp announced at the company's gadgets-focused event in Seattle, would prevent Ring doorbell cameras from recording audio and video footage when residents are home. It will be released in the fall, Limp said.

Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. The Massachusetts Democrat also expressed alarm that Ring may be pursuing face - scanning technology that could flag certain people as suspicious.

Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. The Massachusetts Democrat also expressed alarm that Ring may be pursuing face - scanning technology that could flag certain people as suspicious.

Amazon has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras, according to a letter to a U.S. senator defending its video-sharing partnerships with police.

FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, Ernie Field pushes the doorbell on his Ring doorbell camera at his home in Wolcott, Conn. Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. The company said in a letter released Tuesday, Nov. 19 by U.S. Sen. Ed Markey that facial recognition is a “contemplated, but unreleased feature” of its home security cameras. The Massachusetts Democrat wrote to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in September raising privacy and civil liberty concerns about Ring’s video-sharing partnerships with hundreds of police departments around the country.   (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, Ernie Field pushes the doorbell on his Ring doorbell camera at his home in Wolcott, Conn. Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. The company said in a letter released Tuesday, Nov. 19 by U.S. Sen. Ed Markey that facial recognition is a “contemplated, but unreleased feature” of its home security cameras. The Massachusetts Democrat wrote to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in September raising privacy and civil liberty concerns about Ring’s video-sharing partnerships with hundreds of police departments around the country. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)

The company told Sen. Ed Markey that facial recognition is a “contemplated, but unreleased feature” of its home security cameras but that there are no plans to coordinate that feature with its law enforcement partnerships.

Amazon announces new 'Home Mode' privacy feature for Ring doorbells

  Amazon announces new 'Home Mode' privacy feature for Ring doorbells If toggled, the video doorbells won't record when owners are home.The feature, which Amazon's hardware chief David Limp announced at the company's gadgets-focused event in Seattle, would prevent Ring doorbell cameras from recording audio and video footage when residents are home. It will be released in the fall, Limp said.

Fight for the Future says it will delete all the photos and data after two weeks. "This should probably be illegal, but until Congress takes action to ban facial -recognition surveillance, it ' s terrifyingly easy for "Following that logic, I could set up my surveillance project in a neighborhood filled with Ring doorbells .

Ring shapes communications of police agencies it works with. Critics fear it ’ s building up a for-profit private surveillance network.

Markey wrote to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in September raising privacy and civil liberty concerns about Ring’s video-sharing agreements with police departments across the country. The company encourages police to tap into Ring’s Neighbors app, a forum for residents to share videos of suspicious activity captured by their home security cameras.

The Massachusetts Democrat also expressed alarm that Ring may be pursuing face-scanning technology after a patent application showed the company is exploring a system that could flag certain people as suspicious and automatically alert police.

Markey released Amazon’s responses Tuesday.

Amazon’s initial response to Markey said Ring doesn’t currently offer facial recognition. Then Markey sent another letter to Bezos asking why it’s mentioned in Ring’s privacy policy. In a Nov. 1 follow-up, Amazon’s vice president of public policy, Brian Huseman, said that the company frequently innovates based on customer demand and that facial recognition is an increasingly common feature in cameras made by competitors such as Google’s Nest division.

Get a free Echo Show when you buy a Ring Video Doorbell

  Get a free Echo Show when you buy a Ring Video Doorbell If you've been thinking about adding a smart doorbell to your home, then Amazon's latest deal may tempt you. The company is currently offering a free Echo Show 5 smart display to people who buy a Ring Video Doorbell 2 or Video Doorbell Pro through Amazon.com. Prime subscribers can save an additional $40 off the Video Doorbell 2 and $50 off the Video Doorbell Pro, making them $159 and $199 respectively. Otherwise, the two devices will set you back $199 and $249. The Echo Show 5, meanwhile, currently costs $89.99.With this deal, you're getting two devices for the price of one.

The doorbell facial scanner is not the only surveillance tool Amazon has envisioned recently. Amazon has already faced other criticism for Rekognition. The tech company has piloted this It ’ s not clear that Amazon will actually manufacture these products once it has secured the patents.

Amazon has acquired video doorbell and home security camera maker Ring in a deal reportedly worth more than For Ring , Amazon provides a scale not possible for a small company. Siminoff said in an interview We want to deliver the most cost-effective solution to customers at scale. So it ’ s not about

“If our customers want these features in Ring security cameras, we will only release these features with thoughtful design including privacy, security, and user control,” Huseman wrote.

Markey’s questions about facial recognition were part of broader concerns that some lawmakers and civil liberties advocates have about Ring and its police partnerships. Amazon sought to address those concerns in its letters to Markey, emphasizing that camera owners have a choice about whether to share videos. The company noted that police aren’t allowed to seek recordings that are longer than 12 hours in duration or that cover a geographical area that is too specific or broad.

But Amazon also said it doesn’t require law enforcement to delete a user’s video footage after a certain period. Nor would it entertain Markey’s request that it commit to never selling users’ biometric information, saying only that it doesn’t do so now.

Home Depot sale on Ring Doorbells and Nest Secure

  Home Depot sale on Ring Doorbells and Nest Secure Today only, Home Depot has great sales on Ring Doorbells with Spotlight Cams, full security camera setups and a Nest Secure starter pack with two cameras. We're seeing substantial savings on several bundles with free delivery, but the sale ends ends tonight. © Provided by Cable News Network, Inc.The Ring bundles integrate best with Amazon's Alexa, and if you have an Echo Show, you can see who's at your door from the smart display. The Nest Secure Alarm and Cams integrate with the Google Assistant and Nest Hub smart displays, so there's something here for both smart ecosystems.

Amazon has acquired smart doorbell maker Ring , a company that's valued at more than billion, according to its founder. Considering that Ring is one of the most dominant smart home companies today — the company says it sold 140,000 products just in one 24-hour period on QVC — it ' s not

Ring ' s doorbells don't currently use facial recognition software to detect specific people. The American Civil Liberties Union has repeatedly criticized the technology' s use, in particular by Amazon , saying it could create an unjust surveillance state that could target political activists and those unfairly

Markey said Tuesday that Amazon is not doing enough to ensure that its products don’t run afoul of civil liberties.

“Connected doorbells are well on their way to becoming a mainstay of American households, and the lack of privacy and civil rights protections for innocent residents is nothing short of chilling,” he said in a statement.

“If you’re an adult walking your dog or a child playing on the sidewalk, you shouldn’t have to worry that Ring’s products are amassing footage of you and that law enforcement may hold that footage indefinitely or share that footage with any third parties,” he added.

More than 600 police departments have signed up to Ring’s network since last year and many say it is becoming a useful crime-fighting tool. Among them is the police chief of Markey’s hometown of Malden, Massachusetts. Chief Kevin Molis said he is Markey’s neighbor and has known him since the 1970s but disagrees with him about Ring.

“We consider it a valuable tool for public safety,” Molis said in an interview. “Is it a bad thing that private citizens, in order to make their streets safer, are investing their own money in a product that’s allowing crimes to be solved and crimes to be prevented?”

But staff attorney Mohammad Tajsar of the ACLU of Southern California said Amazon’s responses to Markey raise grave privacy concerns. Amazon told Markey it has no way of knowing if its cameras are collecting personal data from children or positioned in such a way that they’re intruding on a neighbor’s privacy.

“Even if you don’t sell data, or provide data to law enforcement, you’re creating a mechanism whereby people can express latent biases and racism and classism in a portal that encourages it,” Tajsar said.

Ring gave police a detailed map of area doorbell installations .
Police departments partnered with Amazon's Ring security service had access to maps that revealed where Ring video doorbells were located, CNET reports. While Amazon has said police do not have access to the location of devices -- which they can request footage from -- the heat maps provided to police allowed them to zoom in on specific locations. CNET reviewed public documents from the Rolling Meadows Police Department in Illinois. Those revealed that police had access to heat maps of Ring video doorbell concentrations, and when zoomed in, the map would show light circles around individual locations.

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