Technology: Bird's first non-electric scooter is made for kids - - PressFrom - US
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Technology Bird's first non-electric scooter is made for kids

15:50  20 november  2019
15:50  20 november  2019 Source:   engadget.com

San Francisco grants Jump, Lime, Scoot and Spin e-scooter licenses

  San Francisco grants Jump, Lime, Scoot and Spin e-scooter licenses The relationship between San Franscico and sharable electric scooter programs has been contentious, with city authorities stepping in last year to regulate the services. Following the latest round of permit applications, the city has announced that four companies will be allowed to operate electric scooter programs for the next year: Jump, Lime, Scoot and Spin. San Francisco was the birthplace of the electric scooter, with Bird, Spin and Lime starting operations there last March. However, there were many objections to the scourge of scooters, including that discarded scooters blocked access for pedestrians and that people frequently rode them on pavements.

Bird is making a traditional kick-powered scooter for kids . The California-based startup, which has flooded countless cities with dockless electric scooters , will sell its child-friendly Birdie for 9 throughout the holiday season. The vehicle comes in three colors -- Jet Black

Bird is a reliable last mile electric scooter rental service. Our mission is to make cities more livable by reducing car usage, traffic, and congestion. Bird Two. An electric vehicle that ' s second to none.

Bird is making a traditional kick-powered scooter for kids. The California-based startup, which has flooded countless cities with dockless electric scooters, will sell its child-friendly Birdie for $129 throughout the holiday season. The vehicle comes in three colors -- Jet Black, Dove White and Electric Rose -- and has all of the basic features you would expect from a three-wheeled scooter, such as height-adjustable handlebars, a lean-to-steer frame and rear-mounted "stomp brake." The company has warned that only "a limited number" are being made, so act fast if you fancy one.

  Bird's first non-electric scooter is made for kids

So why is Bird making this? The company has no plans, it seems, to add the Birdie to its electric scooter and cruiser bike fleets. In a press release, the startup said it was simply made "in response to a demand for a non-electric scooter designed for kids." Birdies could increase the company's festive-period revenue and reinforce the brand with a demographic that will -- should the dockless scooter phenomenon survive long enough -- eventually be able to download the app and spend their own money on motorized rides. It's the same reason why countless car manufacturers, including Tesla, have made kid-sized versions of their most iconic vehicles.

Travis VanderZanden, CEO of Bird said: "Birdies are a fun way to give a nod to the founding of Bird and to give families the opportunity to ride together." It's a nice idea, though I can't imagine a child -- especially one riding a push-powered Birdie -- keeping up with a parent's electric scooter.

bird.co/birdie

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