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Technology Russia will seemingly ban devices without pre-installed Russian software

15:31  22 november  2019
15:31  22 november  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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Russia reportedly passed a law banning the sale of phones, computers and smart TVs without Russia software pre-installed. It'll come into force in July 2020, according to the BBC. Legislation was apparently passed by the country's lower house of parliament on Thursday, but the list of impacted devices and software they'll need have yet to be determined.

Vladimir Putin wearing a suit and tie: Russian President Vladimir Putin's government reportedly passed a law that'll require devices sold in the country to have Russian software pre-installed. Mikhail Klimentyev\TASS via Getty Image © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Russian President Vladimir Putin's government reportedly passed a law that'll require devices sold in the country to have Russian software pre-installed. Mikhail Klimentyev\TASS via Getty Image Vladimir Putin wearing a suit and tie: Russian President Vladimir Putin's government reportedly passed a law that'll require devices sold in the country to have Russian software pre-installed. © Mikhail Klimentyev\TASS via Getty Image

Russian President Vladimir Putin's government reportedly passed a law that'll require devices sold in the country to have Russian software pre-installed.

It won't mean devices from outside Russia will have their usual pre-installed software banned, but the Russian software will have to be pre-installed as well. Supporters said the legislation is focused on promoting the country's tech, the BBC noted.

However, critics suggested that the Russian software could be used as a method of surveillance, and that the requirements might drive companies out of the Russian market.

The Kremlin's press office didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

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