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Technology Pennsylvania court rules suspect can't be forced to provide his password

04:10  25 november  2019
04:10  25 november  2019 Source:   engadget.com

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Pennsylvania 's Supreme Court has ruled that authorities were asking Joseph J. Davis, the accused in a child pornography case, to violate his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination when they asked him to provide the password for his computer. A lower court had determined that the request

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a forceful opinion today holding that the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects individuals from being forced to disclose the passcode to their devices to the police. In a 4-3 decision in Commonwealth v. Davis, the court found that disclosing a password is

Law enforcment might soon have a harder time forcing suspects to unlock their devices. Pennsylvania's Supreme Court has ruled that authorities were asking Joseph J. Davis, the accused in a child pornography case, to violate his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination when they asked him to provide the password for his computer. A lower court had determined that the request fell under an exemption to the Fifth Amendment when Davis seemingly acknowledged the presence of child porn on his PC, but the state Supreme Court rejected that argument on the grounds that a password is testimony and thus protected under the Constitution.

New Year's resolution: Protect your credentials with the Google Chrome password manager

  New Year's resolution: Protect your credentials with the Google Chrome password manager Your Google browser will securely store your long, complex website passwords and login details. Here's how to set it up.Like all password managers, the one in your Chrome browser can store the login information you use to access websites and services, and sign you in with a single master password.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a forceful opinion today holding that the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects individuals from being forced to disclose the passcode to their devices to the police. In a 4-3 decision in Commonwealth v. Davis, the court found that disclosing a password is

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a forceful opinion today holding that the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects individuals from being forced to disclose the passcode to their devices to the police. In a 4-3 decision in Commonwealth v. Davis, the court found that disclosing a password is

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Justice Debra Todd noted that revealing a password is testimonial as it's a "verbal communication" that reveals your mind, not just a physical act like providing a blood sample. It also pointed to federal Supreme Court precedent where people couldn't be forced to reveal the combination to a wall safe -- in both cases, divulging the code was opening a "pathway" to incrimination.

The decision pleased advocacy groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which wrote a friend-of-the-court briefing in the case. It noted that people store a "wealth of deeply personal information" on their devices, and that the government shouldn't force people into a "no-win situation" where they either have to reveal everything or resist a court order.

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  Google wants to warn you if you reuse passwords or create weak ones "The state of passwords is so bad that we want to turn this on for every user across the internet."Google said it would integrate the tool, which is designed to warn people if their usernames and passwords were stolen in data breaches, into its Password Manager on Wednesday. Password Checkup was first released as a Google Chrome extension in February.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a forceful opinion today holding that the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects individuals from being forced to disclose the passcode to their devices to the police. In a 4-3 decision in Commonwealth v. Davis, the court found that disclosing a password is

Florida appellate court finds that boy can invoke his Fifth Amendment privilege. A Florida state appellate court has ruled that an inebriated teenager involved in a car crash that resulted in the death of another person cannot be compelled to provide a passcode to his iPhone 7—the boy can indeed

As Ars Technicaobserved, the Fifth Amendment isn't a guaranteed shield against providing your password. It may depend on the particular circumstances of the case. So long as the ruling (along with expected ones in New Jersey and Indiana) stands, though, police may have to accept that they won't always get a password -- they may have to crack a device if they want to see what it contains.

PA Courts (PDF)

Google is making it easier to check if your passwords have been compromised in a data breach .
Google has a password manager that syncs across Chrome and Android, and now the company is adding a “password checkup” feature that will analyze your logins to ensure they haven’t been part of a massive security breach — and there have been oh so many of those. Password checkup was already available as an extension, but now Google is building it right into Google account controls. And it’ll be prominently featured at passwords.google.com, which is the URL shortcut to Google’s password manager. Your login credentials are compared against the millions upon millions of known compromised accounts that’ve been part of major breaches.

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