•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Zuckerberg: People should "make their own judgments" on political ads

18:20  02 december  2019
18:20  02 december  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

Mark Zuckerberg on lies in political ads: ‘I don’t think it’s right for a private company to censor politicians’

  Mark Zuckerberg on lies in political ads: ‘I don’t think it’s right for a private company to censor politicians’ Facebook’s CEO rallies people around the First AmendmentZuckerberg’s speech, which amounted to a rallying cry for the First Amendment during a time when speech rights are under siege globally, acknowledged the fact that Facebook profits off misinformation — but said that’s not why the company decided to allow inaccurate ads to remain on the platform:

Mark Zuckerberg again defends the social network's policy on political advertisements . "What I believe is that in a democracy, it's really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments , Zuckerberg told CBS This Morning co-host

Mark Zuckerberg again defends the social network's policy on political advertisements . "What I believe is that in a democracy, it's really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments , Zuckerberg told CBS This Morning co-host

Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg is doubling down on his company's decision to not take down political ads that contain false information.

Priscilla Chan, Mark Zuckerberg looking at the camera: ctm-1202-mark-zuckerberg-priscilla-chan.jpg © CBS News ctm-1202-mark-zuckerberg-priscilla-chan.jpg

"What I believe is that in a democracy, it's really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments. And, you know, I don't think that a private company should be censoring politicians or news," Zuckerberg told "CBS This Morning" co-host Gayle King in his first network TV interview with his wife, Priscilla Chan.

"But a small group of your employees… about 200 wrote a letter saying that they wish that you would reconsider. 'Because,' they said, 'free speech and paid speech are not the same,'" King said, adding, "Do they have a point?"

Mark Zuckerberg defends free speech on Facebook

  Mark Zuckerberg defends free speech on Facebook Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg took to the stage at Georgetown today to defend freedom of expression. Most recently, Facebook has been criticized for allowing politicians to post misleading ads. But Zuckerberg is calling for more free speech and cautioned against "potentially cracking down too much" on social networks. In an interview with The Washington Post, Zuckerberg says he too worries "about an erosion of truth." But, he added, "I don'tIn an interview with The Washington Post, Zuckerberg says he too worries "about an erosion of truth." But, he added, "I don't think people want to live in a world where you can only say things that tech companies decide are 100 percent true.

Zuckerberg : People should " make their own judgments " on political ads . "CBS Evening News with Norah O'Donnell" moves to Washington, D.C. They wanted us to show them how lesbians have sex. They said 'show us' and I don't remember if it was on its own or part of a larger phrase but the words

Zuckerberg says ‘ people should be able to judge for themselves the character of politicians’ and compares alternative to censorship. “What I believe is that in a democracy, it’s really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments

"Well, this is a clearly a very complex issue, and a lot of people have-- have a lot of different opinions," Zuckerberg said. "At the end of the day, I just think that in a democracy, people should be able to see for themselves what politicians are saying."

"Even if the ads are-- contain false information? That's the-- that's the issue," King said.

"I think that people should be able to judge for themselves the character of politicians," Zuckerberg said.

Last month, it was revealed Zuckerberg had an undisclosed meeting with President Trump in October at the White House after a public Oval Office meeting in September.

"What was the nature of the meeting? Can you say?" King asked.

"Sure. I mean... we talked about a number of things that were-- that were on his mind. And-- and some of the topics that you'd read about in the news around-- around our work," Zuckerberg said.

Mark Zuckerberg knows he comes across as 'robotic'

  Mark Zuckerberg knows he comes across as 'robotic' The Facebook CEO tells NBC News he's working to improve his communications skills.The Facebook CEO made the admission in a wide-ranging interview with NBC  Nightly News with Lester Holt that was broadcast Monday evening. The interview comes as Facebook unveils several initiatives that show how it's preparing for election security as the race for the White House ramps up.

Though Zuckerberg didn't offer further detail, he denied that Trump attempted to lobby him on the subject of political ads on Facebook. "What I believe is that in a democracy it's really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments

people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments ,” Zuckerberg said, repeating his standpoint he first In late October, a group of about 200 Facebook employees signed a letter asking him to reconsider his position that political ads should be exempt

The dinner was not disclosed by the White House and only became public after the fact through news reports. It came as President Trump was openly discouraging Facebook from banning political ads.

King pointed out some people would say "the optics weren't good," adding, "Did he try to lobby you in any way?"

"No. I mean, I don't think that that's-- that-- I think some of the stuff that people talk about or think gets discussed and these discussions are not really how-- how that works… I also want to respect that it was a private dinner and... private discussion," Zuckerberg said.

At the same time, Facebook faces anti-trust investigations into its dominance of the social media marketplace. At least two federal agencies and 47 U.S. states and territories are asking if the company engages in anti-competitive behavior.

"There's no question that there are real issues that-- that we need to keep on working on… But I think it's important to not lose track of just the enormous good that can be done by bringing people together and building community," Zuckerberg said.

Hundreds of employees criticize Facebook's political ad policies

  Hundreds of employees criticize Facebook's political ad policies Over the past month, Facebook has come under criticism for allowing politicians to run false or misleading ads. Now, employees are speaking out. More than 250 Facebook employees wrote a letter addressed to CEO Mark Zuckerberg and top Facebook officials calling Facebook's political ad policies "a threat to what FB stands for." In the letter, obtained by The New York Times, the employees argue that allowing misinformation to run could increase distrust in Facebook and undermine Facebook's integrity.

In their first joint TV interview, Mark Zuckerberg & Priscilla Chan invite Gayle King into their home to talk are saying so that they can make their own judgments and you know I don't think that a private company should be и киноТВ-шоуCBS This MorningВидеоMark Zuckerberg on political ads .

These are young people who have grown up in the shadow of the Capitol, and now, as a historic They want to make sure students are able to transcend the spin and make their own judgments . And although he backs Trump, he said he believes the president should be held accountable if he

People who know Zuckerberg well say Facebook wouldn't be the company it is today without the influence of Chan, his wife who is a teacher and doctor.

"When Mark and I talk about these issues together, it's like I also have the lens of being an educator and pediatrician that's worked deeply with families and individuals, and all types of communities. And when I zoom out, I also see that these are societal problems," Chan said. "These are not problems that one person, one company, can fix on their own… there's not gonna be some silver bullet, but we need to work together as a society for that steady progress."

Tune in Tuesday, December 3, on "CBS This Morning" for more of Zuckerberg and Chan's conversation with King, where King visited the couple at home and the offices of their philanthropic company, The Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative, which turns four years old Tuesday.

Mark Zuckerberg says breaking up Facebook won't solve real issues .
Critics continue to question the social network's power."A lot of people are upset and are talking about measures like breaking up the company… that aren't actually going to fix these issues, right? I mean, breaking up Facebook isn't going to address the question of political discourse," Zuckerberg told CBS This Morning. (Editors' note: CNET is owned by CBS.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 4
This is interesting!