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Technology Judge says class action over Apple's MacBook butterfly keyboards can continue

01:45  03 december  2019
01:45  03 december  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Apple Says Some Older IPhones May Not Turn On Due to Failed Part

  Apple Says Some Older IPhones May Not Turn On Due to Failed Part Apple Inc. on Friday said that some iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus models manufactured between October 2018 and August 2019 may not turn on due to a failed part. The company offered a free repair program for users who are affected. The iPhone 6s line originally went on sale in September 2015, but was officially discontinued in September 2018 with the launch of last year’s iPhones. Still, Apple continued producing some iPhone 6s models for sale in select markets, including India.The repair program is the sixth for Apple this year, according to the company’s website.

Apple ' s butterfly keyboards , first released in 2015, don't perform well, critics say . In a ruling Monday, US District Judge Edward Davila wrote that upset MacBook customers could continue their lawsuit in part because Apple ' s attempted fixes over the years, and further repair programs for the

Apple on Monday was denied a motion to dismiss a class action lawsuit leveled by MacBook U.S. District Judge Edward Davila in an order handed down in San Jose, Calif., today said Apple failed As noted in the suit, Apple ' s butterfly keyboard can in some cases succumb to small amounts of

A federal judge in California rejected Apple's request to dismiss a class action lawsuit from customers who said it failed to address issues with the "butterfly" keyboard on its MacBooklaptops .

an open laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Apple's butterfly keyboards, first released in 2015, don't perform well, critics say. Sarah Tew/CNET© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Apple's butterfly keyboards, first released in 2015, don't perform well, critics say. Sarah Tew/CNET

In a ruling Monday, US District Judge Edward Davila wrote that upset MacBook customers could continue their lawsuit in part because Apple's attempted fixes over the years, and further repair programs for the keyboards, were possible signs it did not provide an "effective fix" for the devices.

Apple is finally fixing its dreaded MacBook Pro keyboard design once and for all

  Apple is finally fixing its dreaded MacBook Pro keyboard design once and for all Over the past few years, whenever a friend would ask me for advice about buying a new MacBook, I'd tell them that it was probably worth waiting a bit. It wasn't that Apple's MacBook lineup wasn't compelling, but rather that the butterfly keyboard design Apple first introduced on its 2016 MacBook Pro was prone to causing all sorts of typing nightmares. Over the past few years, Apple implemented a few changes which did manage to improve the overall reliability of the butterfly keyboard design. Still, even the third iteration of the design caused problems for a number of users.

Apple wanted to change the keyboard game when it introduced the butterfly design with the original MacBook years ago. So you probably remember that, back in 2018, a class action lawsuit was leveled against Apple due to those faulty butterfly keyboards , with so many of them apparently

Apple ’ s polarizing butterfly keyboard design is now causing the company some legal issues. A new class action lawsuit has been filed against Apple , alleging that the company knew about the reliability issues of the design before launch, yet released it anyway… Ecobee HomeKit Thermostat.

The ongoing suit is the latest ding for Apple's new laptop keyboards. The butterfly keyboards, as they were called, were announced alongside Apple's newest laptops in 2015, promising a thinner, yet still effective design. They were named butterfly because of how they worked. (You can watch Apple's video about that here.)

a person using a laptop computer sitting on top of a keyboard: Apple's butterfly keyboards, first released in 2015, don't perform well, critics say.© CNET

Apple's butterfly keyboards, first released in 2015, don't perform well, critics say.

Soon after their launch, however, some customers learned the butterfly keys were prone to collecting dust, and of failing to register presses, or of sensing too many. The problems were vexing enough that Apple created a replacement program in 2018, while also attempting to solve the problem.

The suit against Apple was filed in May of 2018, shortly after Apple announced the repair program.

Apple might not release a MacBook Pro with an improved keyboard design until next year

  Apple might not release a MacBook Pro with an improved keyboard design until next year If you've been patiently waiting for Apple to fix the butterfly keyboard design it introduced a few years back, you'll have to wait just a little bit longer. While we saw a few reports pointing towards Apple introducing a 16-inch MacBook Pro with a more reliable scissor-style keyboard design sometime this month, a new research note from Ming-Chi Kui (via MacRumors) relays that we won't see a new keyboard design until 2020. Kuo doesn't specifyKuo doesn’t specify which MacBook model will be the first to re-introduce the scissor switch keyboard, but it’s long been assumed that it would be rumored 16-inch MacBook Pro.

Apple has been hit with a class action lawsuit over the so-called butterfly switch keyboard that’ s found on all MacBook models from 2015. The plaintiffs claim Apple knew the keyboard was a flawed design even before the product launched and are seeking damages.

A federal judge this week rejected Apple ' s request to dismiss a class action lawsuit over its faulty butterfly keyboards , reports Reuters, which means Apple launched a repair program that covers all of its MacBook , ‌ MacBook Pro‌, and MacBook Air models that have a butterfly keyboard , but at the

a man sitting in front of a laptop© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Has the new MacBook Pro finally fixed Apple's keyboard problem?

Apple in the meantime went back to the standard "scissor" design with its newest laptops last month, prompting praise from reviewers. The keys, CNET's Scott Stein said, feel "more natural, and have a more generous 1mm of 'travel' -- so when you depress the key, you actually feel it move."

Apple attempted to have the suit dismissed, claiming in part that the customers (called "plaintiffs" in court-speak) hadn't participated in its repair programs, and thus couldn't prove it didn't do enough to fix the their laptops.

"Plaintiffs sufficiently allege they have suffered an injury-in-fact: Apple's alleged failure to repair the defective keyboards, including through the Program, has caused a concrete, particularized, and actual injury to each Plaintiff," Davila wrote in the opinion, earlier reported on by Reuters. "Plaintiffs sufficiently plead that the Program is ineffective in remedying the allegedly defective design of the butterfly keyboards."

The judge was careful to add, however, he was not issuing ruling on the actual case Monday. He was just allowing it to move forward despite Apple's objections.

Benjamin Johns, a lawyer representing the customers, said in a statement that he was please the court allowed the suit to continue. Apple didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Is the MacBook Pro a better buy than the Air? .
This year, Apple made some moves to simplify its laptop lineup, including an upgrade to the MacBook Pro which included an eighth-gen Intel quad-core processor, better speakers and a True Tone display. At $1,299 (to start), the newest model of Pro is now only $200 more than the Air. Deputy Managing Editor Nathan Ingraham found the slight price upgrade was well worth it for users who intended to push their machines performance-wise. He wound up awarding the device a respectable score of 86.

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