Technology: Homeland Security wants to use facial recognition at airports on US citizens, too - - PressFrom - US
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Technology Homeland Security wants to use facial recognition at airports on US citizens, too

02:30  03 december  2019
02:30  03 december  2019 Source:   cnn.com

Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology

  Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology Customs and Border Protection is considering outfitting Border Patrol with controversial facial recognition technology deployed through their body cameras, according to a new federal filing. The agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach. WithinThe agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach.

Homeland Security wants to expand facial recognition checks for travelers arriving and departing the U . S . to also include citizens , which had previously But although there may not always be a clear way to opt-out of facial recognition at the airport , U . S . citizens and lawful permanent residents — also

Facial recognition will be deployed at the top 20 U . S . airports by 2021 for “100 percent of all international passengers", including American citizens But according to Buzzfeed, the United States Department of Homeland Security is rushing to get systems up and running at airports across the

The Department of Homeland Security wants to be able to use facial-recognition technology to identify all people entering and leaving the United States — including US citizens.

a man standing in a room© Gregory Wallace/CNN

In a recent filing, the DHS proposed changing existing regulations "to provide that all travelers, including US citizens, may be required to be photographed upon entry and/or departure" from the United States, such as at airports.

Michael Hardin, director of exit/entry policy and planning at the DHS, told CNN Business that the rule is in the "final stages of clearance." But because it hasn't yet been published it won't go into effect until after a period of public comment, he said.

Google Pixel 4's facial recognition tech works when owners' eyes are closed

  Google Pixel 4's facial recognition tech works when owners' eyes are closed Earlier this week, the BBC's Chris Fox reported that the Pixel 4's facial recognition unlock feature works even when you're unconscious -- no eyes needed. Raising concern about the security of upcoming Pixel 4 series owners, BBC technology reporter Chris Fox tweeted earlier this week that "The Pixel 4 facial recognition works even if you're asleep/dead." In response to the worry that this tweet caused, Google told the BBC Thursday simply that "We will continue to improve Face Unlock over time" and that this is how the phone will go on sale next week. This would allow a Pixel 4 to be unlocked while its owner is sleeping or unconscious.

Homeland Security is joining the ranks of government agencies pushing for wider use of facial recognition for US travelers. The department has proposed that US citizens , not just visa holders and visitors, should go through a mandatory facial recognition check when they enter or leave the country.

A United States airport has become the first in the nation to permit passengers to use facial After the first check-in, passengers can also use face recognition to pass through security and to get on the plane. He has called the use of facial recognition at U . S . airports a “massive threat.” He said his fear is that the government’s facial recognition database of citizens could be used for other

Facial recognition technology, which typically matches an image of a person from a photo or video with a still image of them in a database, is becoming increasingly common in airports throughout the world as governments and airlines use it for security and check-in purposes.

The US government in particular has used facial recognition for the past 20 years or so, although it has only recently ramped up biometric boarding at airports. Since the mid-aughts, any non-US citizen traveling to the United States gets their picture taken and fingerprints scanned on arrival, but this has not been a requirement for citizens.

In 2017 President Donald Trump signed an executive order to accelerate a full roll out of airport biometrics for all domestic and international travelers. This was also supported by the Obama Administration.

ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition

  ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition The ACLU is unsurprisingly concerned about the FBI's use of facial recognition, and it wants to force the agency to divulge its practices. It just filed a lawsuit against the FBI, the Justice Department and the DEA ordering them to turn over records showing "when, where and how" they use facial recognition tech. The civil liberties group was concerned that these systems could "fundamentally alter" society and lead to constant surveillance, and pointed to the FBI's history and public stances as reasons to be concerned.The FBI has engaged in "political policing," the ACLU said, including spying on peaceful activists.

Facial - recognition technology is unproven and largely unregulated — yet it is already arriving at airports How to opt out of facial recognition at the airport . But airports are stressful places where many of Are you going to want to opt out at check in? At baggage drop? At security checkpoints?

WASHINGTON — A new report concludes that a Department of Homeland Security pilot program improperly gathers data on Americans when it requires passengers embarking on foreign flights to undergo facial recognition scans to ensure they haven’t overstayed visas.

Yet while the DHS said the proposed regulation change is meant to help spot criminals and prevent travel-document fraud, the American Civil Liberties Union noted on Monday that the filing contradicts US Customs and Border Protection's previous statement that US citizens would not be subject to such surveillance.

"Travelers, including U.S. citizens, should not have to submit to invasive biometric scans simply as a condition of exercising their constitutional right to travel," ACLU senior policy analyst Jay Stanley said in a statement. "The government's insistence on hurtling forward with a large-scale deployment of this powerful surveillance technology raises profound privacy concerns."

Biometric entry-exit has been recommended — but not widely enforced — since the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996. And the 9/11 Commission Report, the official report into the 2001 terror attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C., concluded that a biometric entry-exit screening system for foreign nationals was integral to US national security.

Homeland Security wants airport face scans for US citizens .
Homeland Security is joining the ranks of government agencies pushing for wider use of facial recognition for US travelers. The department has proposed that US citizens, not just visa holders and visitors, should go through a mandatory facial recognition check when they enter or leave the country. This would ostensibly help officials catch terrorists using stolen travel documents to move about. The existing rules specifically exempt citizens and permanent residents from face scans.It won't surprise you to hear that civil rights advocates object to the potential expansion.

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