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Technology Mark Zuckerberg says breaking up Facebook won't solve real issues

19:45  03 december  2019
19:45  03 december  2019 Source:   cnet.com

How to watch Mark Zuckerberg's speech about 'voice and free expression' Thursday

  How to watch Mark Zuckerberg's speech about 'voice and free expression' Thursday The Facebook boss will livestream his comments about "the challenges that more voice and the internet introduce," as well as global threats to free expression."It's the most comprehensive take I've written about my views, why I believe voice is important, how giving people voice and bringing people together go hand in hand, how we might address the challenges that more voice and the internet introduce, and the major threats to free expression around the world," he wrote on his Facebook page Wednesday.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg doesn't think breaking up his social network is going to solve "real issues." It's a message we've heard before. In an interview with CBS This Morning that aired Tuesday, Zuckerberg said he welcomes regulation of the tech industry, but reiterated that measures like breaking up Facebook aren't the right fix.

Mark Zuckerberg holding a grey shirt: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about the Facebook News feature at an event in New York. Drew Angerer/Getty Images© Provided by CNET Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about the Facebook News feature at an event in New York. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

"A lot of people are upset and are talking about measures like breaking up the company… that aren't actually going to fix these issues, right? I mean, breaking up Facebook isn't going to address the question of political discourse," Zuckerberg told CBS This Morning. (Editors' note: CNET is owned by CBS.)

How to watch Mark Zuckerberg's speech about 'voice and free expression' Thursday

  How to watch Mark Zuckerberg's speech about 'voice and free expression' Thursday The Los Angeles Angels Wednesday named the experienced Joe Maddon to be their new manager.

Lawmakers and even one of the social network's co-founders have called for US regulators to curb the social network's power Some critics have called for Instagram, a photo-sharing site, and WhatsApp, a messaging service, to be split from the company. When asked if one company should have such influence or power, Zuckerberg in the interview said "no."

Mark Zuckerberg holding a grey shirt: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about the new Facebook News feature at the Paley Center For Media on October 25, 2019 in New York City. © Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about the new Facebook News feature at the Paley Center For Media on October 25, 2019 in New York City.

"I think that the basic answer to what you're saying is, 'No,'" Zuckerberg told CBS This Morning. "Private companies should not be in the position of making so many important decisions, balancing different social values that we all care about."

Mark Zuckerberg defends free speech on Facebook

  Mark Zuckerberg defends free speech on Facebook Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg took to the stage at Georgetown today to defend freedom of expression. Most recently, Facebook has been criticized for allowing politicians to post misleading ads. But Zuckerberg is calling for more free speech and cautioned against "potentially cracking down too much" on social networks. In an interview with The Washington Post, Zuckerberg says he too worries "about an erosion of truth." But, he added, "I don'tIn an interview with The Washington Post, Zuckerberg says he too worries "about an erosion of truth." But, he added, "I don't think people want to live in a world where you can only say things that tech companies decide are 100 percent true.

During the interview, part of which aired Monday, Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan, his wife, also talked about Facebook's controversial policy on political advertisements and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), a philanthropic organization working on projects like eliminating all disease and improving equity in education.

Mark Zuckerberg's New Year's resolution: No more annual challenges .
For the past decade, Facebook's CEO has pushed himself to learn mandarin, run and code artificial intelligence software for his home.Zuckerberg's personal challenges, which came across as equal parts honest new year's resolution and cynical PR ploy to make him seem more personable, have been an annual tradition for the 35-year old Facebook co-founder for more than a decade. In the past, he's pushed himself to learn to hunt and cook, read more books and improve his public speaking.

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