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Technology Chicago police blame Facebook for illegal gun, drug sales

23:30  03 december  2019
23:30  03 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

Street-racing truck driver arrested after leading police on high-speed pursuit, Bellaire police say

  Street-racing truck driver arrested after leading police on high-speed pursuit, Bellaire police say A man was arrested after authorities said he led police on a high-speed chase around the 610 Loop late Sunday night. Police said they tried to stop a truck that was street racing on the West Loop around 11:55 p.m. According to authorities, the truck had expired tags. The driver of the truck didn't stop, and instead, led police on a chase that lasted about 15 minutes and ended in a residential area off 288. During the chase, police said, the truck reached speeds of about 100 mph.The driver was arrested and charged with felony evading. A passenger was released at the scene without charges.Bellaire police said they've been aggressively combatting street racing on the 610 Loop.

Chicago police announced the results of "Operation FaceBOOKED" Tuesday, blaming Facebook for inaction on illegal gun and drug sales . The company also prohibits private firearms sales on Facebook and Instagram. Facebook has removed 7 million pieces of drug sale content and 4.8

Chicago Police arrested 50 people for using "secret groups" on Facebook to sell guns and drugs , the Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson, at a news conference to announce the arrests, criticized "We do not allow the sale of guns or drugs on our platform. We routinely work with law

CHICAGO (AP) — Private Facebook groups have “emboldened” sellers of illegal drugs and guns to connect with potential buyers over the social media site, Chicago police said Tuesday, as leaders announced that a two-year undercover investigation led to more than 50 arrests.

Former Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, left, who was named interim police superintendent in Chicago by Mayor Lori Lightfoot, addresses a news conference where he fielded questions on the firing by Lightfoot of retiring superintendent Eddie Johnson and Facebook gun sales Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. Standing with Beck is First Deputy Superintendent Anthony Riccio, as the pair announced that investigators have arrested more than 50 people accused of using private Facebook groups and messages to sell guns or drugs. Police also blamed the social media company for complicating such cases by taking down investigators' fake profiles during a Tuesday press conference announcing results of the two-year investigation. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)© Provided by Associated Press Former Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, left, who was named interim police superintendent in Chicago by Mayor Lori Lightfoot, addresses a news conference where he fielded questions on the firing by Lightfoot of retiring superintendent Eddie Johnson and Facebook gun sales Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. Standing with Beck is First Deputy Superintendent Anthony Riccio, as the pair announced that investigators have arrested more than 50 people accused of using private Facebook groups and messages to sell guns or drugs. Police also blamed the social media company for complicating such cases by taking down investigators' fake profiles during a Tuesday press conference announcing results of the two-year investigation. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

Police leaders, including Chicago’s new interim superintendent, also accused Facebook of failing to help prevent illegal sales of guns. The social media company banned private sales, trades and exchanges of firearms in 2016, but investigators said they found dealers using private groups and messages to quickly sell firearms and drugs at prices higher than street values.

Couple allegedly ran shoplifting ring, sold stolen items online for $2.7M

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(Reuters) - Police in Chicago said on Thursday they have arrested 50 people suspected of using "secret groups" on Facebook to deal in guns and drugs However, police later said the department and the California-based company agreed to work collaboratively "to target any illegal activity on the

(Reuters) - Police in Chicago said on Thursday they have arrested 50 people suspected of using "secret groups" on Facebook to deal in guns and drugs However, police later said the department and the California-based company agreed to work collaboratively "to target any illegal activity on the

First Deputy Superintendent Anthony Riccio said Facebook agreed to shut down groups identified during the Chicago investigation but that it also should kick members of those groups off the site.

“Facebook often cites privacy concerns when they are confronted with the facts of our investigation,” Riccio said. “The truth is, Facebook is harboring criminals. These criminals know how to use the privacy Facebook affords them and they profit from the sales of illegal drugs and dangerous guns.”

Riccio also said police have been frustrated by Facebook’s removal of fake profiles that investigators use to pose as potential buyers.

Sergeant runs 15K in SWAT gear, saves a life and gets engaged in 1 day

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CHICAGO — The city ’s top law enforcement officer on Thursday ripped social media giant Facebook for doing too little to assist the agency to thwart illegal gun and drug sales facilitated through the social media platform. The sharp criticism came as Chicago Police officials announced they carried

Chicago Police arrested 50 people for using "secret groups" on Facebook to sell guns and drugs , the police said on Thursday, and they criticized the world's biggest social media network as being unhelpful during the 10-month investigation. Police did not detail the charges filed against.

Facebook spokeswoman Sarah Pollack said the company quickly responds to “valid legal” requests from police.

“Illicit drug and firearms sales have no place on our platform,” Pollack said. “We remove content and accounts that violate our policy and catch over 97% of drug sale content and over 93% of the firearms sales content we remove before it is reported to us.”

The company’s instructions for law enforcement say a subpoena is required to share a subscriber’s records including name, email addresses and location information on recent log-ins; disclosing contents of an account requires a federal or state search warrant. The site also says all Facebook users must use “the name they go by in everyday life,” and fake accounts will be penalized.

Facebook says it uses detection technology to find content that violates its policies banning the sale of drugs or firearms, including posts in private groups.

Missouri police department’s tongue-in-cheek drug scam alert going viral

  Missouri police department’s tongue-in-cheek drug scam alert going viral A Missouri police department is getting lots of attention for a tongue-in-cheek warning to local drug dealers and purchasers – don’t get scammed. Police in Winfield, Missouri, north of St. Louis, posted to Facebook saying officers have been made aware of a new scam in which “some untrustworthy drug dealers are using their cellphone, instead of a certified scale to display the weight of the merchandise they are selling.” Sign up for ourPolice in Winfield, Missouri, north of St. Louis, posted to Facebook saying officers have been made aware of a new scam in which “some untrustworthy drug dealers are using their cellphone, instead of a certified scale to display the weight of the merchandise they are selling.

Announcing the arrests at a news conference, Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson initially criticized Facebook as being unhelpful during a 10-month investigation by his department. Police did not detail charges facing the 50 men and women arrested through Thursday, but said there were "dozens and.

CHICAGO — Chicago police say they see it all too often. Officers arrest someone for illegal gun possession, and the next day that person walks out of jail. Police officials say changes to Cook County’s bail system are partly to blame . But is that true? WGN Investigates reviewed data on every

Chicago police leaders have blasted Facebook after previous investigations of illegal guns and drug sales on the site. In 2017, then-Superintendent Eddie Johnson said the company was failing to cooperate with police cracking down on the activity.

Tension over law enforcement’s use of social media networks exists in other areas too; for example, police in Memphis were sued by the state’s branch of the American Civil Liberties Union in 2018 for using an undercover Facebook account to monitor protest groups’ activities.

Personal privacy advocates say Facebook could do more to protect users from that type of police activity and keep meeting its baseline responsibility to hold law enforcement to the same rules as everyone else on the platform.

“Police shouldn’t get to follow different rules than members of the public,” said Dave Maass, a researcher for the Electronic Frontier Foundation. “They may say ‘Oh, this is to cut down on gun sales.’ The next thing you know, you’re searching social media for information on First Amendment activities or whether they’ve been driving while texting.”

Charlie Beck, Chicago’s interim police superintendent and the former head of the Los Angeles Police Department, said Tuesday that Facebook users’ privacy rights don’t “trump the rights of the general public.”

“Another person’s rights have to stop where the safety of another individual becomes in jeopardy,” Beck said. “That’s what laws are all about.”

More than $100K stolen in Chicago cannabis dispensary burglary that cops now say was an inside job .
The burglary of a Chicago cannabis dispensary shop earlier this week was an inside job, police said Friday. “We do not suspect this was a random burglary,“ said head Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi in an emailed statement. Additionally, Guglielmi said the shop reported more than $100,000 in cash was taken. A MOCA Modern Cannabis spokeswoman said no one was available to comment on the recent developments about the burglary. A representative did not immediately respond to an email.Just after 8 a.m. Monday, officers responded to a report of a burglary at the shop, 2847 W. Fullerton Ave., while the business was closed.

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