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Technology Portland, the largest city in Oregon, plans to propose first facial recognition ban affecting private companies

12:00  04 december  2019
12:00  04 december  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

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Portland , the largest city in Oregon , plans to propose first facial recognition ban affecting private companies . Current bans on facial recognition technology, such as ones in San Francisco and Oakland, California, only affect city agencies such as police departments.

recognition ban affecting private companies . 4 December 2019, by Kristin Lam, Usa Today. The city of Portland , Oregon , is considering a unique ban on facial recognition software that could If the Portland City Council passes the pending legislation next year, officials may copy those efforts

The city of Portland, Oregon, is considering a unique ban on facial recognition software that could limit how private companies use it.

Current bans on facial recognition technology, such as ones in San Francisco and Oakland, California, only affect city agencies such as police departments. If the Portland City Council passes the pending legislation next year, officials may copy those efforts and add private retailers and airlines to the ban.

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The Portland City Council has passed the toughest facial recognition ban in the US that blocks both public and private use of the technology. Other cities such as Boston, San Francisco, and Oakland have passed laws barring public institutions from using facial recognition , but Portland is the first to

Now, Portland , Oregon , has plans to ban the use of facial recognition for both the government and private businesses in the city , a move that could The proposed ban comes after cities including San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley in California, and Somerville in Massachusetts, have already

Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty is spearheading the proposed ban, citing concerns of privacy, consent and civil rights.

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“The technology is currently extremely biased against people of color and women," Hardesty said at a September work session on the ban. "But even if these problems are improved on, automated surveillance and collection of people’s biometric data is unacceptable.

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"We need to take a strong stand that the automated surveillance state is not welcome in the city of Portland," she said.

Supporters of the technology argue law enforcement can identify possible criminals with the data and stores could give recognized shoppers special offers. To streamline security, some airlines already use facial recognition, said U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Facial recognition surveillance would require warrant under bipartisan bill

  Facial recognition surveillance would require warrant under bipartisan bill Currently, there are no limits on how federal law enforcement agencies can use facial recognition. James Martin/CNET The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act was introduced by Sen. Chris Coons, a Democrat from Delaware, and Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah. The bill calls for federal agencies like the FBI and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to obtain a warrant if they want to use facial recognition for ongoing surveillance, like tracking a person's whereabouts for longer than 72 hours.

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ban in the country - Portland , Oregon , aims to ban the use of the controversial technology not only by city government, but also by private companies There's an episode of Better off Ted where the company tries to install facial recognition for the doors, but it can't detect the black employees.

The potential of the software, however, has also drawn concern from federal lawmakers. In March, a bipartisan bill was introduced by Sens. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) to strengthen consumer protections by prohibiting companies that use facial recognition technology from collecting and resharing data for identifying or tracking consumers without their consent.

At the state level, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a temporary ban on facial recognition technology in police body cameras in October. Detective Lou Turriaga, director of the Los Angeles Police Protective League, opposed the move.

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“I understand trying to seek a balance between civil liberties and law enforcement, but a wholesale ban doesn’t help us protect anybody,” he told USA TODAY at the time. “Why remove that tool from law enforcement? It just doesn’t make sense.”

The Portland City Council is expected to have another work session on its ban early next year.

Contributing: Edward C. Baig and Marco della Cava, USA TODAY.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Portland, the largest city in Oregon, plans to propose first facial recognition ban affecting private companies

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