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Technology Homeland Security doesn’t want Americans' airport face scans after all

23:25  05 december  2019
23:25  05 december  2019 Source:   engadget.com

President Trump tweets that Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan is stepping down

  President Trump tweets that Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan is stepping down President Donald Trump said in a tweet Friday that acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan is stepping down. © Provided by CNBC LLC Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan testifies before the House Oversight and Reform Committee on President Donald Trump said in a tweet Friday that acting Homeland Security Secretary Kev Trump in his tweet congratulated McAleenan on a "job well done" and said he would be announcing a new acting secretary next week. He added that there were "many wonderful candidates.

Homeland Security is joining the ranks of government agencies pushing for wider use of facial recognition for US travelers. The department has proposed that US citizens, not just visa holders and visitors, should go through a mandatory facial recognition check when they enter or leave the country.

Homeland Security is joining the ranks of government agencies pushing for wider use of facial recognition for US travelers. The department has proposed that US citizens, not just visa holders and visitors, should go through a mandatory facial recognition check when they enter or leave the country.

Earlier this week, reports circulated that Homeland Security wanted to scan the faces of travelers, including US citizens, as they enter or leave the country. Naturally, critics raised concerns that the practice would violate citizens' privacy and that the "intrusive surveillance technology" could lead to abuses of power. Now, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) says that it will allow US citizens to voluntarily participate in the program. In other words, US citizens can opt out.

a group of people standing in a room

In a statement provided to Engadget, a CBP spokesperson said:

"U.S. Customs and Border Protection is using biometric facial comparison technology to facilitate the entry and exit of international travelers while meeting the Congressional mandate to implement a biometric entry-exit system. U.S. citizens are out of scope of the mandated biometric entry-exit program. However, U.S. citizens are required to establish identity and citizenship to CBP and present a valid U.S. passport for international travel.

China introduces mandatory face scans for phone users

  China introduces mandatory face scans for phone users China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday, according to the country's information technology authority, as Beijing continues to tighten cyberspace controls. In September, China's industry and information technology ministry issued a notice on "safeguarding the legitimate rights and interests of citizens online", which laid out rules for enforcing real-name registration. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Homeland Security wants to force all travelers including US citizens to undergo face scans when The scans would also identify suspected terrorists and other criminals. Critic say no-one should Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union, blasted the idea in a written

Homeland Security wants to expand facial recognition checks for travelers arriving and departing the U.S. to also include citizens, which had previously been Facial recognition for departing flights has increased in recent years as part of Homeland Security ’s efforts to catch visitors and travelers who

CBP did consider including US citizens in its facial recognition checks to avoid the challenges of having separate processes for foreign nationals and US citizens, TechCrunch reports. "Upon consultation with Congress and privacy experts, however, CBP determined that the best course of action is to continue to allow U.S. citizens to voluntarily participate in the biometric entry-exit program," a CBP spokesperson said.

The ACLU, which spoke out against plans to conduct biometric scans on US citizens, is still concerned. In a statement, ACLU Senior Policy Analyst Jay Stanley said:

"The Department of Homeland Security's plans to spread face recognition surveillance nationwide remain alarming, especially given the lack of congressional authorization and sufficient safeguards, the government's past security failures, and unanswered questions about the technology's effectiveness, bias, and broader societal implications. The government cannot be trusted with this surveillance technology, and Congress should put the brakes on its use."

US Customs and Border Patrol

No current, credible threats against U.S. homeland -DHS .
There are no current threats against the United States' homeland, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said in a statement on Friday after a U.S. air strike killed a top Iranian commander in Baghdad. © ASSOCIATED PRESS Protesters demonstrate over the U.S. airstrike in Iraq that killed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani in Tehran, Iran, Jan. 3, 2020. Iran has vowed "harsh retaliation" for the U.S. airstrike near Baghdad's airport that killed Tehran's top general and the architect of its interventions across the Middle East, as tensions soared in the wake of the targeted killing.

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