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Technology Proposal to require facial recognition for US citizens at airports dropped

02:01  06 december  2019
02:01  06 december  2019 Source:   cnet.com

Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology

  Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology Customs and Border Protection is considering outfitting Border Patrol with controversial facial recognition technology deployed through their body cameras, according to a new federal filing. The agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach. WithinThe agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach.

US Customs and Border Protection said Thursday it will drop its plans to require that US citizens go through a biometric face scan when entering or The proposed rule was first published in spring 2018 in the Unified Agenda of Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions, a compendium the Executive Office of

The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is pushing to impose mandatory facial recognition scans on all Americans entering or leaving the United States , moving to close a loophole that allows citizens to opt out. Proposed in a recent filing, the DHS requested a change to the current rules in

US Customs and Border Protection said Thursday it will drop its plans to require that US citizens go through a biometric face scan when entering or exiting the country. Currently, citizens have the right to opt out of the scans, but a proposed rule indicated the agency was planning to make the program mandatory for all travelers.

a person standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: A boarding passenger goes through a biometric facial recognition scanner at Dulles Airport in 2018. CBP says it won't pursue a rule to require US citizens to go through the scans. Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images© Provided by CNET A boarding passenger goes through a biometric facial recognition scanner at Dulles Airport in 2018. CBP says it won't pursue a rule to require US citizens to go through the scans. Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The proposed rule was first published in spring 2018 in the Unified Agenda of Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions, a compendium the Executive Office of the President publishes every three months. A rule-making process that allows for public comment typically follows before a proposal can become a new regulation. The CBP's proposal was republished this fall, leading TechCrunch to ask the agency if it was still pursuing the rule.

Facial recognition surveillance would require warrant under bipartisan bill

  Facial recognition surveillance would require warrant under bipartisan bill Currently, there are no limits on how federal law enforcement agencies can use facial recognition. James Martin/CNET The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act was introduced by Sen. Chris Coons, a Democrat from Delaware, and Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah. The bill calls for federal agencies like the FBI and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to obtain a warrant if they want to use facial recognition for ongoing surveillance, like tracking a person's whereabouts for longer than 72 hours.

DHS proposes MANDATORY facial recognition checks for US citizens at airports . Proposed in a recent filing, the DHS requested a change to the current rules in order to “provide that all travelers, including US citizens , may be required to be photographed upon entry and/or departure” from the

Facial recognition will be deployed at the top 20 U . S . airports by 2021 for “100 percent of all international passengers", including American citizens But according to Buzzfeed, the United States Department of Homeland Security is rushing to get systems up and running at airports across the

A boarding passenger goes through a biometric facial recognition scanner at the Dulles Airport in 2018. CBP said Thursday it would not pursue a rule to require US citizens to go through the scans.© Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A boarding passenger goes through a biometric facial recognition scanner at the Dulles Airport in 2018. CBP said Thursday it would not pursue a rule to require US citizens to go through the scans.

"There are no current plans to require US citizens to provide photographs upon entry and exit from the United States," the agency said in a statement. "CBP intends to have the planned regulatory action regarding US citizens removed from the unified agenda next time it is published."

The biometric exit program has expanded to at least 17 airports, and CBP plans to have it scan 97 percent of outbound passengers by 2021. The system scans passengers faces just before boarding airplanes, looking for passengers who don't match passport photos and other government documents.

Homeland Security wants airport face scans for US citizens

  Homeland Security wants airport face scans for US citizens Homeland Security is joining the ranks of government agencies pushing for wider use of facial recognition for US travelers. The department has proposed that US citizens, not just visa holders and visitors, should go through a mandatory facial recognition check when they enter or leave the country. This would ostensibly help officials catch terrorists using stolen travel documents to move about. The existing rules specifically exempt citizens and permanent residents from face scans.It won't surprise you to hear that civil rights advocates object to the potential expansion.

This airport commits to facial recognition tech. In a recent filing, the DHS proposed changing existing regulations "to provide that all travelers, including US citizens , may be required to be photographed upon entry and/or departure" from the United States , such as at airports .

Facial Recognition at the Airport (photo by Eric Bowman). The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced plans for a new proposal that would According to The Associated Press, officials from the DHS said the proposal would require American citizens to go through the same process as

The technology promises to speed international travelers through airports, but privacy advocates have raised concerns. The concerns include high rates of false negatives for women and people of color, and whether there are sufficient checks on how the biometric data can be used by government agencies.

The system keeps photos of US citizens for 12 hours. It keeps non-citizen photos for 14 days, but also shares them with the DHS database called IDENT, which stores photos for 75 years.

In a statement, ACLU policy analyst Jay Stanley said the rule should never have been proposed to begin with. What's more, he said, the technology continues to raise major privacy concerns even if the rule isn't approved.

"The government cannot be trusted with this surveillance technology," Stanley said, "and Congress should put the brakes on its use."

'This is some real-life Black Mirror stuff' .
Lawmakers heard testimony on the risks of facial recognition programs which are largely unregulated.The technology is being increasingly used by law enforcement worldwide.

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