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Technology Hackers targeted BMW, Hyundai in hunt for trade secrets

16:20  08 december  2019
16:20  08 december  2019 Source:   engadget.com

Watch an Olympian run in a bubble full of hydrogen car emissions

  Watch an Olympian run in a bubble full of hydrogen car emissions Earlier this year, Hyundai launched the Nexo: a hydrogen fuel cell-powered SUV that only emits water and oxygen. Even though the vehicle promises an environmentally friendly transportation option, its adoption is hampered by the lack of proper fuel cell infrastructure. So, how does one advertise a clean vehicle with a pretty severe limitation? Apparently, by getting an Olympic swimmer to run inside a bubble attached to a Nexo's exhaust toHyundai España's YouTube page has posted a commercial (spotted by Motor1) showing Olympic swimmer and brand ambassador Mireia Belmonte running on a treadmill inside a sealed bubble. The video clearly shows that a Nexo's exhaust is connected to the structure.

BMW , at least, found the hackers quickly -- instead, it let them operate for "months" to gather data before blocking them at the start of December. BMW declined to comment on the specific case, saying instead that it had "structures and processes" that both limited external hacking attempts and

The German automotive giant BMW discovered and monitored a group of hackers who infiltrated the company's networks and stayed active since at BMW hacked by #OceanLotus in spring 2019 - used CobaltStrike - no evidence that they had access to central data center in Munich - Hyundai targeted

Two of the world's larger car makers were the victims of a sophisticated (but still not very successful) hacking campaign. Bayerricscher Rundfunk has learned that intruders from the hacking group OceanLotus slipped into the networks of BMW and Hyundai in an attempt to find trade secrets. BMW, at least, found the hackers quickly -- instead, it let them operate for "months" to gather data before blocking them at the start of December. No sensitive data would have leaked out of BMW, according to an anonymous security expert, and the attackers wouldn't have breached the central data center in Munich.

a silver and black car

BMW declined to comment on the specific case, saying instead that it had "structures and processes" that both limited external hacking attempts and would let it quickly spot and recover from intrusions. Hyundai hasn't responded to requests for comment so far.

Hyundai is investing $35 billion in autonomous driving and electric cars

  Hyundai is investing $35 billion in autonomous driving and electric cars Hyundai does not intend to be left behind in the high-stakes race to build mass-market electric and self-driving cars. © Peter Kovalev/TASS/Getty Images The Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Rus car factory, in the Kamenka industrial area. South Korea's largest car company said Tuesday that it plans to invest 41 trillion won ($35 billion) into "future mobility technology" by 2025. That massive pledge puts it on par with some of the industry's top players. Volkswagen is spending €30 billion ($34 billion) over the next five years to make an electric or hybrid version of every vehicle in its lineup.

Hackers monitored for months Following the discovery, the hackers were allowed to stay active with the probable end purpose of collecting more info on who they were, how many systems they managed to compromise, and what data they were after, if any, as Munich-based Bayerischer Rundfunk's reports.

Alleged Vietnamese Ocean Lotus (APT32) hackers breached the networks of the car manufacturers BMW and Hyundai to steal automotive trade secrets . The APT32 also targeted peripheral network security and technology infrastructure corporations, and security firms that may have connections with

The culprits may have been easy to identify, though. OceanLotus (aka APT32 or Cobalt Kitty) has been around since 2014 and is believed to be a Vietnam-backed group that typically targets dissidents and threats, and has lately targeted car brands that might include Toyota and Lexus. Conveniently, Vietnam recently launched its own automaker with BMW as a key supplier. The country may be trying to fast-track its growth by swiping ideas from rivals.

It's not certain if Mercedes-Benz, VW or other brands were targeted. However, this follows a longstanding pattern of corporate espionage hacks on the part of countries that want to understand how certain businesses work. This certainly puts BMW in a difficult spot. It's in a partnership where a supposed ally might be hacking its systems, and confronting its partner could create massive headaches.

BR (translated)

Under the mighty propellers of Hyundai's flying taxi .
By law, an automaker must mention "mobility" during any press event. Hyundai knows this but instead of just talking about how their cars can be configured to drive us around in the future, they went full-on flying machine. In a partnership with Uber, they announced the SA-1 air taxi at a press event. Sadly, at said press gathering what we saw was a tiny model. Fortunately, the full-size model was in the booth and we checked it out. The SA-1 isThe SA-1 is far larger than anticipated. The four-passenger mock-up vehicle is impressive in its size and thanks to redundant propellers, it seems like a viable air transportation system.

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