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Technology Smartphone Use Causes Neck, Head Injuries To Rise

10:20  09 december  2019
10:20  09 december  2019 Source:   medicaldaily.com

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Keeping your cell phone near and excessive use can cause adverse effects in humans. Buzz60.

head and neck injuries while consulting their smartphones , reports a new American study published in the review JAMA Otolaryngology- Head 30% of the accidents linked to using a smartphone while walking in the street. The injuries included cuts, bruises, grazes, abrasions and internal injuries

a person standing in front of a building talking on a cell phone© Pixabay The rise of smartphones comes with the growing number of people with head and neck injuries in the U.S. A new study shows that the devices have been sending more people to the emergency room over the past two decades due to injuries like facial cuts, bruises and fractures.

People are now sticking their nose to mobile screens more often. This increases the risk of tripping, falling and hurting their heads and necks.

The study, published in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology, used a database from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to analyze emergency room visits in nearly 100 hospitals across the country. Researchers recorded 2,500 patients with cellphone-related head or neck injuries from 1998 through 2017.

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head and neck injuries while consulting their smartphones , reports a new American study published in the review JAMA Otolaryngology- Head & Neck Surgery. 30 per cent of the accidents were linked to using a smartphone while walking in the street. The injuries included cuts, bruises, grazes

A head injury is an injury to the brain, skull, or scalp. It can be hard to assess the severity of the injury just by looking. Minor head injuries may bleed a lot, while some major injuries don’t bleed at all. All head injuries should be treated seriously and assessed by a doctor. Learn about the six major types.

The team from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark said that injuries linked to use of mobile phones significantly increased after 2006. That is when the first smartphones were introduced, Boston 25 News reported.

Some reported injuries were caused by phones themselves, such as people getting hit by a thrown phone. But a majority of cases were caused by distracted use, including texting while walking, tripping and landing face-down on the sidewalk.

Boris Paskhover, a reconstructive surgeon and lead study author from Rutgers, said he launched the study after treating more patients with phone-related injuries. He noted that most of the cases were minor injuries but the growing issue should be taken seriously.

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An American study has shown that 30% of accidents linked to smartphones are caused when individuals are walking along the street while staring at their smartphones . Since they became a part of everyday life

head and neck injuries while consulting their smartphones , reports a new American study published in the review JAMA Otolaryngology- Head & Neck Surgery. 30% of the accidents were linked to using a smartphone while walking in the street. The injuries included cuts, bruises, grazes, abrasions and

“I don’t think people are aware of how fragile we are as humans. We’re resilient, but we’re also fragile. You fall and you can get a pretty bad injury,” Paskhover told NBC News. “You walk in the city and you see everyone just looking at their phones. Be aware that you can hurt yourself.”

The researchers estimated that the number of all people injured by or because of phones could reach nearly 76,000 across the country. From 1998, annual cases totaled less than 2,000. But when the industry started selling smartphones after 2006, the figure significantly increased.

Nearly 40 percent of people with smartphone injuries were at ages 13 to 29. Many patients reported being hurt while walking, texting or driving.

Some injuries even led to serious health problems and required surgeries, such as traumatic brain injuries. Paskhover said the study highlights the importance of reducing screen time when walking or doing other activities.

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head and neck injuries while consulting their smartphones , reports a new American study published in the review JAMA Otolaryngology- Head & Neck Surgery. 30% of the accidents were linked to using a smartphone while walking in the street. The injuries included cuts, bruises, grazes, abrasions and

head and neck injuries while consulting their smartphones , reports a new American study published in the review JAMA Otolaryngology- Head & Neck Surgery. 30 per cent of the accidents were linked to using a smartphone while walking in the street. The injuries included cuts, bruises, grazes

“Don’t be distracted — period,” he said. “Be self-aware. Answer a text message, fine, but you shouldn’t be walking around reading articles on your phone.”

Related video: How Screen Time Affects Kids’ Brains (Provided by NowThis News)


E-scooter injuries quadrupled in four years .
It probably won't shock you to hear that the rise of e-scooters and their matching services has led to more injuries, but researchers now have some more tangible proof. A UCSF study indicates that electric scooter-related injuries in the US jumped 222 percent between 2014 and 2018, with over 39,000 people hurting themselves. There were 'only' about 3,300 hospital admissions, but that's an increase of a staggering 365 percent. Most first-time injuries came to the 18-to-34 crowd. And yes, the lack of helmets was a problem -- almost a third of injuries involved some kind of head trauma.

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