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Technology All it takes to fool facial recognition at airports and banks is a printed mask, researchers found

21:35  12 december  2019
21:35  12 december  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com

Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology

  Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology Customs and Border Protection is considering outfitting Border Patrol with controversial facial recognition technology deployed through their body cameras, according to a new federal filing. The agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach. WithinThe agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach.

a couple of people posing for the camera© Kneron
  • Researchers were able to fool facial recognition software at airports and banks using a printed mask, highlighting security vulnerabilities.
  • The tests were carried out across three continents, fooling mobile payment tablets, a Chinese border control station, and a passport control gate at Amsterdam's Schiphol airport.
  • However, researchers were unable to fool some facial recognition software, including Apple's Face ID.

Facial recognition is being widely embraced as a security tool - law enforcement and corporations alike are rolling it out to keep tabs on who's accessing airports, stores, and smartphone lock screens.

Facebook AI can 'hide' people from facial recognition

  Facebook AI can 'hide' people from facial recognition Facebook has already stopped using facial recognition by default, but now it might have a way for people to dodge facial recognition altogether. Its researchers have developed an AI system that can "de-identify" people in real time, including live videos. The approach pairs an adversarial auto-encoder with a trained face classifier to ever-so-slightly distort a person's face in a way that confuses facial recognition systems while preserving a natural look that stays recognizable by honest-to-goodness humans. You might see tiny differences in Jennifer Lawrence's face, for instance, but you won't have any doubt that it's her.

As it turns out, the technology is fallible. Researchers with the AI firm Kneron were able to fool facial recognition systems at banks, border crossing checkpoints, and airports using a printed mask depicting a different person's face, they announced Thursday.

Researchers tested facial recognition across three continents. They successfully fooled payment tablets run by Chinese companies Alipay and WeChat, as well as a border crossing checkpoint in China. In Amsterdam, the printed mask fooled a facial recognition checkpoint at Schiphol airport.

The researchers say their findings suggest that anyone who prints out a lifelike mask resembling someone else can bypass security checkpoints to fly or shop on their behalf.

ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition

  ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition The ACLU is unsurprisingly concerned about the FBI's use of facial recognition, and it wants to force the agency to divulge its practices. It just filed a lawsuit against the FBI, the Justice Department and the DEA ordering them to turn over records showing "when, where and how" they use facial recognition tech. The civil liberties group was concerned that these systems could "fundamentally alter" society and lead to constant surveillance, and pointed to the FBI's history and public stances as reasons to be concerned.The FBI has engaged in "political policing," the ACLU said, including spying on peaceful activists.

"Technology providers should be held accountable if they do not safeguard users to the highest standards. There are so many companies involved that it highlights an industry-wide issue with substandard facial recognition tech," Kneron CEO Albert Liu said in a statement.

Some facial recognition software proved impervious to the printed mask test, however. Researchers wrote that Apple's Face ID and Huawei's facial recognition both passed their test - both of which use more sophisticated technology known as structured light.

Researchers noted that, for the most part, the tests were carried out with the permission of human security guards supervising the checkpoints - as long as humans are present and notice the mask, facial recognition checkpoints aren't entirely unsecure.

San Francisco loosens facial recognition ban to allow newer iPhones .
San Francisco is learning first-hand about the risks of blanket bans on facial recognition. City supervisors have voted to amend a ban on facial recognition in local government to allow the use of FaceID-equipped iPhones and other devices where the technology is included, but other features are considered vital and don't have alternatives. Workers aren't allowed to use the facial recognition tech (they'll have to enter passcodes on iPhones, for example), but they don't have to give up a modern handset just to take calls and answer emails.The change is mirrored in smaller towns.

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