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Technology Researchers bypass airport and payment facial recognition systems using masks

15:40  16 december  2019
15:40  16 december  2019 Source:   engadget.com

Facebook AI can 'hide' people from facial recognition

  Facebook AI can 'hide' people from facial recognition Facebook has already stopped using facial recognition by default, but now it might have a way for people to dodge facial recognition altogether. Its researchers have developed an AI system that can "de-identify" people in real time, including live videos. The approach pairs an adversarial auto-encoder with a trained face classifier to ever-so-slightly distort a person's face in a way that confuses facial recognition systems while preserving a natural look that stays recognizable by honest-to-goodness humans. You might see tiny differences in Jennifer Lawrence's face, for instance, but you won't have any doubt that it's her.

Researchers have managed to bypass facial recognition systems using 3D models created using pictures of the target user found on social media. The use of biometrics, like in facial recognition systems , is a well-known form of second factor authentication.

Facial recognition is a topic and somewhat controversial. Discover 7 trends likely to shape the face Biometrics are showing up in airports and border crossing points across the world, promising These automated systems can be used to identify or check the identity of individuals in just a few seconds

Facial recognition technology is increasingly used for everything from government surveillance to convenient online logins, especially in China. A new test reported by Fortune casts doubt on the accuracy of some such systems, however, by showing that they can be fooled by users wearing masks.

  Researchers bypass airport and payment facial recognition systems using masks

To perform the test, artificial intelligence company Kneron commissioned high-quality 3D masks that mimicked the face of another person, and tested whether someone could wear one to fool facial recognition systems. Researchers were able to make purchases from another person's account via the AliPay and WeChat payment systems.

ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition

  ACLU sues to reveal the FBI's uses of facial recognition The ACLU is unsurprisingly concerned about the FBI's use of facial recognition, and it wants to force the agency to divulge its practices. It just filed a lawsuit against the FBI, the Justice Department and the DEA ordering them to turn over records showing "when, where and how" they use facial recognition tech. The civil liberties group was concerned that these systems could "fundamentally alter" society and lead to constant surveillance, and pointed to the FBI's history and public stances as reasons to be concerned.The FBI has engaged in "political policing," the ACLU said, including spying on peaceful activists.

Researchers have proved airport facial recognition systems might not be as secure as we’d hope, as they managed to fool the cameras with different printed masks . With the masks , they managed to successfully fool payment tablets run by the Chinese companies Alipay and WeChat, and a system

Madison Square Garden uses facial recognition technology to identify troublemakers and tag them. A researcher at the University of Cambridge developed new facial recognition methods that can identify people wearing masks , hats and other elements of disguise nearly 70% of the time.

The team were even able to fool systems at airports. In Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, they managed to trick a self-boarding system with just a photo of another person's face. They also tricked train station systems in China where travelers use facial recognition to pay for their journeys. All tests were supervised and performed with permission.

This is not the first time concerns have been raised about the accuracy of facial recognition technology. In August, the American Civil Liberties Union announced that the technology misidentified 26 California lawmakers, primarily people of color. Another report from the UK found that the police's facial recognition system has an 81 percent error rate.

IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition instead of bans

  IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition instead of bans A handful of cities have already banned police from using facial recognition.An official helps a passenger at Washington Dulles Airport near Washington, DC, with new biometric facial recognition scanners.

“By partnering with airports and airlines to provide a secure stand-alone system that works quickly and reliably, which they will integrate into their But facial recognition is already in use in the U.K. with the self-service e-passport "fast lane" for passport checks, says Martin Jartelius, CSO at Outpost24.

Apple's iPhone X security is supposed to be the best because of the facial recognition technology, but researchers were able to bypass Face ID in under a week.

Certainly, some facial recognition systems are better than others. Kneron, for example, announced that their test did not fool the iPhone X. However, other systems were easily bypassed using deception and could potentially lead to fraud. The concern is that people could impersonate wealthy individuals and access their banking or other accounts, or even that terrorists could bypass security measures.

"This shows the threat to the privacy of users with sub-par facial recognition that is masquerading as 'AI'," Albert Liu, CEO of Kneron, told Fortune. "The technology is available to fix these issues but firms have not upgraded it. They are taking shortcuts at the expense of security."

Fortune

Federal study of top facial recognition algorithms finds ‘empirical evidence’ of bias .
Error rates were affected by ethnicity, age, and genderNIST says it found “empirical evidence” that characteristics such as age, gender, and race, impact accuracy for the “majority” of algorithms. The group tested 189 algorithms from 99 organizations, which together power most of the facial-recognition systems in use globally.

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