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Technology The 5 biggest tech trends from CES 2020

23:50  10 january  2020
23:50  10 january  2020 Source:   cnet.com

At CES 2020, surveillance tech will find a prime spot to make its pitch

  At CES 2020, surveillance tech will find a prime spot to make its pitch Companies want to bring facial recognition to the mainstream, sparking concerns from privacy advocates.There, the CTA, which organizes the massive Las Vegas event, gave Chinese voice recognition company iFlytek an innovation award in the "Tech for a Better World" category. Ten months later, the US Commerce Department placed the company, along with Hikvision -- the world's largest supplier of surveillance cameras, whose US arm Ezviz was another CES award winner -- on a blacklist for human rights violations related to the privacy of Uighur Muslims in China.

From high- tech food to folding computers to upgrading your health to a prototype city of the future, these trends mattered. With thousands of new products shouting for your attention, you can easily miss the bigger takeaways at CES . Recognizing the trends that develop and will impact the future is

From high- tech food to folding computers to upgrading your health to a prototype city of the future, these trends mattered. With thousands of new products shouting for your attention, you can easily miss the bigger takeaways at CES . Recognizing the trends that develop and will impact the future is one

With thousands of new products shouting for your attention, you can easily miss the bigger takeaways at CES. Recognizing the trends that develop and will impact the future is one of the most valuable things about the show. And since technology now touches more aspects of our lives than ever before, there were several key trends on display at CES 2020.

a stop sign in front of a crowd: Jason Hiner/CNET© Provided by CNET Jason Hiner/CNET

Here are the ones that will have the biggest impact on the rest of 2020 and beyond.

1. Impossible Pork redefines pigging out

a hand holding a sandwich: Impossible Pork in a Banh Mi sandwich at CES 2020. Angela Lang/CNET© Provided by CNET Impossible Pork in a Banh Mi sandwich at CES 2020. Angela Lang/CNET

Pork is the most consumed meat in the world, and Impossible Foods is on a mission to help the environment and human health by replacing it with plant-based Impossible Pork, which was announced at CES 2020. After being the surprise hit of last year's CES with the launch of the plant-based Impossible Burger 2.0, Impossible Foods again grabbed the spotlight at this year's show. A one-year hit could be shrugged off as a novelty, but Impossible Foods' sequel in 2020 shows that tech has accepted food innovation as a valuable part of the industry.

Samsung's 'The Wall' TV might be the biggest screen we've ever seen

  Samsung's 'The Wall' TV might be the biggest screen we've ever seen The Wall MicroLED TV is a whopping 292 inches, with an 8K model at 150 inches. Just plain huge.The company also showed a 150-inch version with 8K resolution. It uses the same modules the company debited at CES 2019 to achieve a 75-inch, 4K resolution version. "New advancements for 2020 have allowed for larger-scale production of fixed screen sizes," Samsung said in a statement, "including new 88-, 93-, 110- and 150-inch sizes.

CES has kicked off in Las Vegas. After two days of press events and previews, readers may have already had their fill of new in-car technologies It’s a day-long conference track meant to focus on technologies that impact retail. From data to digital displays, it’s the place for attendees to gain a

Share All sharing options for: Eight big takeaways from CES 2020 . That trend expresses itself differently in different types of product categories, but it was pretty consistent across all of them. More from CES . You are reading Processor, a newsletter about computers, software, and tech by Dieter

CNET's journalists gave the taste and texture of Impossible Pork good marks, and there was a lot of interest in the plant-based bacon and sausage that Impossible Foods has promised is coming as part of this move. Since 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions come from livestock, making meat substitutes out of plants could have a massive impact on the environment, as well as help us feed more people more sustainably as the global population grows toward 9 billion by 2050, since growing plants takes a lot less land than grazing animals. Pork is especially widely consumed across Asia, where 4.4 billion of the world's 7.8 billion people live. With its plant-based pork, Impossible Foods is strategically targeting a global audience.

2. Toyota's city of the future has no human drivers

a view of a large city landscape: The Woven City will be located near Mount Fuji in Japan. Toyota© Provided by Roadshow The Woven City will be located near Mount Fuji in Japan. Toyota

By far, the most ambitious thing unveiled at CES 2020 was Toyota's Woven City, a prototype community of the future that will be built near Mount Fuji in Japan. The 175-acre plot of land where Toyota will build this planned community is the site of a now-defunct manufacturing plant. On this land, Toyota will create an experimental laboratory of future technologies including self-driving vehicles run on hydrogen fuel cells, robots, smart homes and new forms of personal mobility. (We assume that means things like the Wello, also unveiled at CES.)

Ivanka Trump disrupted the conversation about women in tech

  Ivanka Trump disrupted the conversation about women in tech Decades of CES speaker pages and Las Vegas ballroom stages have been populated by men, some years exclusively. In 2018, CES ended up with an all-male keynote roster for the second year in a row, and the CTA faced so much backlash from tech leaders and equality groups that organizers added two female panelists at the last minute. But at CES 2020, the Consumer Technology Association is catching shade for inviting a woman to deliver a keynote address. A particular woman: Ivanka Trump, advisor to President Donald Trump. The criticism is grounded in surprise and confusion -- after all, Trump doesn't have direct ties to the technology industry.

CES , the annual tech confab in the heart of Las Vegas, showcases the latest and greatest in So we did the hard work for you to find the most intriguing and exciting gadgets of CES , from accessories Foldable displays are the new hotness, and Lenovo’s showing off its take on the trend with the

At this year's Consumer Electronics Show , better known as CES , companies hope to impress reporters, investors, and ultimately consumers in Las Vegas with a flashy mix of smart assistants and smart cars, giant TVs and, of course, robots.

There will be no human-driven vehicles in the Woven City, because the heart of Toyota's concept is that today's cities are built around cars and it wants to imagine a city that's built for more sustainable forms of transportation. Perhaps the coolest part of this experiment is that regular people will be able to take up residence in the Woven City. This sounds a lot like Walt Disney's original idea for Disney World's Epcot, which stands for Experimental Prototype City of Tomorrow. If the Woven City takes off, look for other companies and communities to replicate the idea.

3. New sensors are coming to upgrade your health

a clock on each of it s sides: The Withings ScanWatch and its app, which looks for signs of sleep apnea. Withings© Provided by CNET The Withings ScanWatch and its app, which looks for signs of sleep apnea. Withings

More health sensors are coming to consumer products, along with apps and software to help you read them, so that you can better understand your body and the state of your health. The level of understanding we can get from today's consumer health products would have cost thousands of dollars and an appointment as a hospital just five years ago. And it was clear at CES 2020 that health companies continue to push this forward at a rapid pace.

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  Wi-Fi speeds are on the rise, but the router industry needs a reality check Commentary: As Wi-Fi speeds up, it's more important than ever for router manufacturers to get real about how fast their products really are.Not in general, mind you -- in fact, routers are actually an extra-fascinating category at CES this year. No, to be specific, I'm sick and tired of the way manufacturers talk about how fast these things are. To be even more specific, I'm sick and tired of the misleading and borderline useless AC and AX ratings that manufacturers use to indicate top speeds. You know, figures like that "AC2600" on the box pictured above.

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There was the Withings ScanWatch, which now includes an electrocardiagram, photoplethysmography for optical heart rate, SpO2 for blood oxygen and deeper sleep analysis that can detect sleep apnea. There was the GoBe3, which can automatically track calorie intake (i.e. the number of calories your body actually absorbs) and can detect your stress level based on skin readings using similar technology to what's used in lie-detector tests. There was also Valencell's blood pressure-sensing earbuds, which could be used to help fight hypertension, the world's most widespread undiagnosed condition. There were products to measure blood sugar and smart glasses to help people with dyslexia -- while those products still have work to do, it's great to see companies dedicating energy and resources to tackle these issues and we have to expect that they're laying the groundwork for future products.

a sign in front of a crowd© Jason Hiner/CNET

A decade or two from now we're likely to look back and be baffled by the ways that we used to make so many decisions about our health without having data to understand what was actually happening. This has the potential to become a democratizing force in health care.

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4. Computers are folding like phones

a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Intel's © Provided by CNET Intel's "Horseshoe Bend" reference design is exploring a new future for PCs. Intel

Foldable phones were one of the hottest topics in the tech world in 2019, and in 2020 foldable laptops could swoop in and take some of that mojo. The driving force behind a larger trend in foldable laptops is coming from Intel's "Horseshoe Bend" reference design that was unveiled at CES. CNET had an exclusive deep dive with Intel on this new take on what a highly versatile and powerful computer of the future could look like.

Horseshoe Bend is essentially a 17-inch tablet or an all-in-one computer (if you use a kickstand and attach a keyboard and mouse) and it folds in half to become a 12.5-inch laptop with a touchscreen on one half and a touch keyboard and touchpad on the other. There's also a hardware keyboard that can slide on the bottom touchscreen for those who don't love virtual keyboards. It's a compelling design that wants to push PCs forward in some new directions. Lenovo unveiled something similar last May, and Microsoft showed its dual-screen concepts in October. At CES, Lenovo showed off its Thinkpad X1 Fold and Dell showed off two foldables, the Concept Ori and the Concept Duet. This party is just getting started.

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5. Tech getting less techie and more subtle

a person looking towards the camera: Mui Lab's smart display is about tech blending in rather than sticking out. Mui Lab© Provided by CNET Mui Lab's smart display is about tech blending in rather than sticking out. Mui Lab

Today's technology is flashy, it's in your face and it's everywhere. It's difficult not to feel like technology is taking over our lives as it embeds itself in more and more places and things. But one of the trends of CES 2020 was technology becoming less obtrusive, more subtle and blending into the environment in more natural ways. We saw three companies that can tell that story: UltraSense, Sentons and Mui Lab.

UltraSense and Sentons are doing something similar. Both use sound waves to create touch interfaces out of plain surfaces made of plastic, metal, wood or other materials. This means the buttonless phone is a lot closer than we think, because this sound-wave technology can simply make the side of the phone a virtual button. Pressing and holding one spot could activate a power button. Sliding your finger up and down one side can change the volume. Squeezing the phone can take a selfie. Running your index finger down the back of the phone could act like a scroll wheel. You get the idea.

These sound-wave buttons don't wear out as fast and the interface is more integrated into the device's build. Manufacturers can also use haptic feedback to help you locate and interact with these virtual buttons. But beyond phones, both companies are also working to bring this technology to other surfaces, including steering wheels on cars, window panes, appliances and much more. This is going to be appearing in phones during 2020, but it's when it starts making its way to other surfaces that its full potential could start to shine through.

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Mui Lab takes a different approach to the same issue. The company has designed a smart display out of a natural wood surface. It looks like a normal strip of wood most of the time, but when it goes into display mode then it lights up with buttons or messages that show directly on top of the wood surface. Mui is a Japanese term that's meant to convey a relaxed state of mind, and the idea behind this product is for it to blend seamlessly into your living space rather than just being another slab of technology taking up space.

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