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Technology Apple called out for lack of 'substantive' help unlocking gunman's iPhones

11:47  14 january  2020
11:47  14 january  2020 Source:   cnet.com

FBI asks Apple to help unlock iPhones of suspected Navy base shooter, report says

  FBI asks Apple to help unlock iPhones of suspected Navy base shooter, report says The iPhone maker has battled previously with the FBI over unlocking devices.CEO Tim Cook has championed strong encryption and Apple's efforts to protect customer data.

Attorney General William Barr called out Apple on Monday, saying the tech giant hasn't "given us any substantive assistance" unlocking two iPhones believed to belong to the gunman in a shooting at a Florida Navy base. Barr said the shooting, which left three people dead, was an act of terrorism.

Crucial quote: "We have asked Apple for their help in unlocking the shooter’ s iPhones . So far Apple has not given us any substantive assistance. The DOJ and Apple previously locked horns in 2015, when Apple flouted a court order to unlock a phone belonging to gunman in San Bernardino who

Attorney General William Barr called out Apple on Monday, saying the tech giant hasn't "given us any substantive assistance" unlocking two iPhones that belonged to the gunman in a shooting at a Florida Navy base. Barr said the shooting, which left three people dead, was an act of terrorism.

a close up of a cell phone: Attorney General William Barr says the FBI has received court authorization to search two iPhones. James Martin/CNET© Provided by CNET Attorney General William Barr says the FBI has received court authorization to search two iPhones. James Martin/CNET

Barr said the FBI had received court authorization to search two iPhones but that "both phones are engineered to make it virtually impossible to unlock them without the password."

FBI asks Apple to help unlock iPhones of suspected naval station shooter

  FBI asks Apple to help unlock iPhones of suspected naval station shooter The FBI is once again asking Apple to help it access iPhones for the sake of an investigation. The bureau has sent a letter to Apple's general counsel requesting the company's help in unlocking the two iPhones of Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, the man believed responsible for killing three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola. FBI officials have requested help from other agencies and countries as well as "familiar contacts in the third-party vendor community," but are hoping Apple will make their lives easier. One of those contacts might be CelleBrite, which reportedly helped the FBI crack San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook's iPhone 5c.

Apple has provided no " substantive assistance" to the investigation according to Barr, reports the New York Times. So far, Apple has provided access to data from the gunman ' s iCloud account, but not anything stored locally on the iPhones that may differ from the iCloud data —as it does not have that

Apple not helping unlock gunman ' s phone - Barr Jump to media player The US attorney general said US Attorney General William Barr has accused Apple of providing no “ substantive assistance” in unlocking two phones used by a cadet who carried out a mass shooting at a US air base last month.

"This situation perfectly illustrates why it is critical that investigators be able to get access to digital evidence once they have obtained a court order based on probable cause," Barr said. "We call on Apple and other technology companies to help us find a solution so that we can better protect the lives of Americans and prevent future attacks."

Apple said it "rejected" the characterization it had been less than helpful and said it responded to requests for assistance in the Florida investigation in a timely manner, adding that it continues to offer assistance. Information provided in response to initial law enforcement requests included iCloud backups, account information and transactional data for multiple accounts, Apple said.

FBI asks Apple to help unlock a mass shooter’s iPhone

  FBI asks Apple to help unlock a mass shooter’s iPhone The FBI recently asked Apple for help unlocking a pair of iPhones that belonged to Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, the man accused of killing three people during a mass shooting at a Navy base in Pensacola, Florida last month. The FBI was granted permission to search the contents of the seized iPhones, but they've been unable to get past the lock screen. Consequently, the FBI sent a letter to Apple's general counsel asking for the company to provide some assistance. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Apple has given investigators materials from the iCloud account of the gunman , Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, a member of Mr. Barr turned up the pressure on Apple a week after the F.B.I.’ s top lawyer, Dana Boente, asked the company for help searching Mr. Alshamrani’ s iPhones .

"We have asked Apple for their help in unlocking the shooter' s iPhones . So far Apple has not given us any substantive assistance," Barr said, next "We call on Apple and other technology companies to help us find a solution so that we can better protect the lives of Americans and prevent future

a close up of a cell phone: James Martin/CNET© James Martin/CNET James Martin/CNET

"We responded to each request promptly, often within hours, sharing information with FBI offices in Jacksonville, Pensacola and New York," Apple said in a statement. "The queries resulted in many gigabytes of information that we turned over to investigators. In every instance, we responded with all of the information that we had."

Other law enforcement officials have echoed Barr's sentiment before, pushing for tech companies to create back doors into encrypted devices to aid investigations. Under the Trump administration, Barr has renewed this call for companies to loosen encryption protections for law enforcement investigations.

Tech giants like Apple and Facebook have stood firm on encryption standards, despite the Justice Department's push against the protection. At a CES panel on privacy Jan. 7, Apple's chief privacy officer, Jane Horvath, defended the company's stance on encryption.

Attorney General asks Apple to unlock naval base shooter's iPhones

  Attorney General asks Apple to unlock naval base shooter's iPhones Attorney General William Barr has joined the FBI in asking Apple to unlock two iPhones belonging to the man who attacked a naval base in Pensacola, Florida, in December. Barr also declared the shooting "an act of terrorism." Apple has given investigators details from Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani's iCloud account, but it rejected a plea from the FBI to unlock the phones. The company has claimed complying with such a request could set a precedent that may compel it to unlock a device whenever a federal agency asks it to. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Apple called out for lack of ' substantive ' help unlocking gunman ' s iPhonesToday at 12:08 AMwww.cnet.com. From beekeeping to fake priests, international movies find US Attorney General asks Apple to unlock Pensacola shooter’ s iPhone . 21 Today at 12:41 AM www.technologyreview.com.

Apple needs to help the FBI unlock two iPhones used by the suspect in the Naval Air Station Instead, he called "on Apple and other technology companies to help us find a solution so that we As The New York Times pointed out , the iCloud account wouldn't include backups of Alshamrani' s

"We have helped in solving cases, preventing suicides. We are very dedicated, and none of us want that kind of material on our platforms," Horvath said. "But building [backdoor] encryption is not how we are going to solve those issues."

She explained that she also manages Apple's law enforcement compliance team, which responds to requests usually within the first 24 hours.

In 2016, Apple resisted the FBI's attempt to force the company to unlock an iPhone used by a terrorist, setting up a legal battle between security and privacy.

The FBI eventually found a third party to unlock the phone and that case largely faded from public debate. A separate case in New York in 2016 that involved a confessed drug dealer ended in a similar fashion, with the FBI dropping its request for Apple's help after finding another way into the iPhone.

Apple didn't immediately respond to a request for comment on Monday. The company told NBC News last week that it gave the FBI "all of the data in our possession" related to the case.

Law enforcement agencies continue to call for access to encrypted communications and devices, while tech companies warn that doing this would weaken the protection and allow potential criminals to take advantage of that same access.

Barr Blasts Apple for Not Helping Unlock Shooter’s iPhones

  Barr Blasts Apple for Not Helping Unlock Shooter’s iPhones U.S. Attorney General William Barr criticized Apple Inc. on Monday for not helping investigators unlock iPhones belonging to the alleged mastermind of a Dec. 6 terrorist attack at a Navy base in Florida. © Bloomberg Attorney General William Barr Participates In Roundtable Discussion With Law Enforcement The shooter, Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, had two iPhones, and the FBI quickly got court approval on probable cause to search the devices, Barr said in prepared remarks discussing the government’s investigation. The attacker shot one of the phones, but the FBI was able to fix the device, he said.

The fatal shooting of three Americans by a Saudi Air Force officer at a Florida naval base last month was "an act of terrorism," U.S. Attorney General William Barr said on Monday, and he called on Apple to help authorities gain access to the gunman ' s two iPhones .

The fatal shooting of three Americans by a Saudi Air Force officer at a Florida naval base last month was "an act of terrorism," U.S. Attorney General William Barr said on Monday, and he called on Apple to help authorities gain access to the gunman ' s two iPhones .

"End-to-end encryption is critically important to the services that we have come to rely on," Horvath said at CES. "If you're going to be able to rely on having health data and finance data on our devices, then we need to make sure that if you misplace that device, you're not losing your sensitive data."

Privacy advocates have also supported Apple's stance, saying weakened encryption could be dangerous.

"There is simply no way for Apple, or any other company, to provide the FBI access to encrypted communications without also providing it to authoritarian foreign governments and weakening our defenses against criminals and hackers," said Jennifer Granick, surveillance and cybersecurity counsel with the ACLU, in a statement Monday.

In December, US lawmakers warned tech giants like Facebook and Apple that they'd pass legislation to regulate encryption if companies couldn't figure a way out to cooperate with police investigations.

Originally published Jan. 13, 12:08 p.m. PT.

Updates, 1:27 p.m. PT: Adds context on encryption and Apple; 2:36 p.m. PT: Adds comment from the ACLU; and 6:20 p.m. Adds Apple's statement.

iOS 13.4 could turn your iPhone and Apple Watch into car keys .
You might be able to use your iPhones and Apple Watches to lock, unlock and start your cars when iOS 13.4 comes out. According to 9to5Google, the first beta version of the mobile OS contains references to a "CarKey" API that will let you use your devices as keys for vehicles with NFC. Based on the internal files the publication saw, you won't even have to authenticate with Face ID -- you simply have to hold your device near the reader to work, even if it's out of battery.In addition, the feature seems to have the capability to give other people access to your vehicle with their devices.

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