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Technology Facebook will now send you notifications for third-party logins

07:10  15 january  2020
07:10  15 january  2020 Source:   engadget.com

Chrome for Android has just solved one of the web's most irritating problems

  Chrome for Android has just solved one of the web's most irritating problems Chrome takes a leaf out of Firefox's book by making websites notification alerts more subtle.The browser already has some options for customizing how these alerts appear, but the new setting aims (called 'Quieter notification permission prompts') is new for anyone using Chrome Canary on their phone or tablet.

Now , the social network has launched a new feature that sends you a notification when your account is used to log into a third - party app. The notification , which you 'll get via email and the Facebook app, shows you what kind of details Facebook shared with the third - party application or website.

Log in . Your iPhone now serves as a Google security key.

It's pretty easy to forget where you use your Facebook credentials to log in, especially since using it is as easy as clicking a single button. Now, the social network has launched a new feature that sends you a notification when your account is used to log into a third-party app. It won't only serve as an added layer of protection that can give you a heads up in case someone improperly accessed your account, it will also give you more control over your information.

a close up of a cell phone

The notification, which you'll get via email and the Facebook app, shows you what kind of details Facebook shared with the third-party application or website. If sharing your email address and photo with a random app you logged into doesn't sit well with you, you can click on the Edit Settings button in the email to remove the app's permission to access your details.

Some apps used Twitter and Facebook logins to steal personal information

  Some apps used Twitter and Facebook logins to steal personal information If you've used your Twitter or Facebook account to log in to another app on your phone, some of your personal information could have been accessed by shady developers. On Monday, Twitter published a notice on its website that says that some third-party developers may have used a software development kit called oneAudience to obtain your email, username and last tweet. According to CNBC, Facebook confirmed that it too had fallen victim to the oneAudience scam and plans to issue a similar notice to its users later today.Twitter says the vulnerability isn't within Twitter itself, "but rather the lack of isolation between SDKs within an application.

Third - party games and apps aren't managed by Facebook , which means you 'll need to contact the app’s developer directly for help, or to report problems like poor game performance. You can find the game or app by searching in the App Center or in the Apps section of your Settings.

You can improve the security of your Facebook account by getting an alert when someone tries logging in from a device or web browser we don't recognize. These alerts will tell you which device tried logging in and where it's located. To get alerts about unrecognized logins

a screenshot of a cell phone: Facebook© Provided by Engadget Facebook

You'll get a notification the first time you use your login with an app and when you reuse it after that app's access to your information has expired. Take note that you can also see which apps currently have access to your log in (and revoke their access if you want to) by going through the social network's privacy checkup.

Facebook for developers

Google is finally cutting down on Android app notification overload .
For a few months now, Android users have been taking to Reddit and Google Support forums to question the seeming disappearance of Google Play Store notifications that should have notified them of the successful completion of an app update. "I've noticed recently that notifications that you have app updates available as well as the notifications saying that an app (was) auto-updated have gone missing," one Reddit user noted. "I haven't changedTurns out, it wasn’t some sort of bug — Google has actually done this on purpose, presumably to help people better manage and deal with the flood of incoming notifications they get throughout the day.

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usr: 1
This is interesting!