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Technology Picard star Patrick Stewart has no problem chatting with Data. Alexa's another thing

15:35  15 january  2020
15:35  15 january  2020 Source:   cnet.com

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star Sir Patrick Stewart back to the Federation cloth for another voyage of boldly going where no one has gone According to an official tweet by the Star Trek account, the series “tells the story of the next Joining Kurtzman on the creative team behind the new Picard series are James Duff (Major

Patrick Stewart executive produces the series and stars as Picard , reprising his role from Star Trek: The Next Generation as well as He felt that at that time his role in the franchise " had run its natural course", but in the years since he was humbled by stories of the impact the character had on the lives

Star Trek is a world of fanciful technology -- transporters, shuttle crafts and warp drives. But that doesn't mean cast members of Trek shows are always proficient in tech.

Patrick Stewart holding a banana: Patrick Stewart, star of Star Trek: Picard, has never used a digital voice assistant. CBS © Provided by CNET Patrick Stewart, star of Star Trek: Picard, has never used a digital voice assistant. CBS

Patrick Stewart, who stars in the upcoming Star Trek: Picard on CBS All Access, admits he's never used a digital voice assistant.

"I haven't had the courage yet," Stewart said in an interview on Sunday. "I get uncomfortable about it. You think because of what I'd done it'd be easy."

I joked that he's OK with Data, but has a problem with Alexa .

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Patrick Stewart is boldly going back to where he’ s gone before — just not in a very long time — when he reprises his role as “ Star Trek: Next The series has now released a trailer and revealed which former “ Star Trek” cast members are joining Stewart — who was last seen as Picard in the 2002 film

Patrick Stewart is boldly going back to where he’ s gone before — just not in a very long time — when he reprises his role as “ Star Trek: Next Generation” captain, Jean-Luc Picard in his With that in mind, TheWrap has rounded up everything that we know about CBS All Access’ second “ Star Trek” series.

"I'm fine with Data because I happen to know he's Brent Spiner, and that makes everything alright," he quipped.

Stewart isn't alone in his distrust of data. Consumers are starting to wise up and apply a more critical lens to tech companies and how they've been exploiting our personal information. He's not even alone among the show's cast. From AI to gene-editing tech Crispr, here's a lightly edited transcript of my conversation with the actors and showrunners of Star Trek: Picard about what freaks them out.

Patrick Stewart looking at the camera: Alison Pill, who appears opposite Patrick Stewart in Star Trek: Picard, gets nervous thinking about the future of Crispr.  © CBS

Alison Pill, who appears opposite Patrick Stewart in Star Trek: Picard, gets nervous thinking about the future of Crispr.

Star Trek: Picard airs Jan. 23 on CBS All Access. (Disclosure: CBS All Access and CNET are both owned by ViacomCBS.)

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' Star Trek: The Next Generation' star Sir Patrick Stewart will revive his beloved Jean-Luc Picard role for Star Trek may be the biggest property CBS owns, and now a new Trek series is coming starring Sir "We have no scripts as yet. We’re just talking talking talking storylines. It will be something very

Patrick Stewart in January. The actor announced on Saturday that he would return to the role of Jean-Luc Picard for a coming “ Star Trek” show on CBS But at a moment when several legacy television shows have returned or are in the process of coming back to the screen, perhaps it is fitting that one

Executive producer and co-creator Alex Kurtzman: For me, the scariest thing is how the internet can be weaponized.

Michelle Hurd, Santiago Cabrera standing in front of a crowd: Star Trek: Picard cast members Raffi Musiker (left), doesn't mind cameras everywhere, while Cristóbal Rios tends to avoid the likes of Siri. CBS © Provided by CNET Star Trek: Picard cast members Raffi Musiker (left), doesn't mind cameras everywhere, while Cristóbal Rios tends to avoid the likes of Siri. CBS

Deepfake technology also terrifies me. We use a version of that algorithm, but again in the wrong hands, that's just a weapon.

Executive producer Heather Kaden: It gets scary when people have access to technology you're not aware of. Can they see through the camera on my computer or my phone? Are they tracking me?

Kurtzman: The answer is yes to everything you asked.

Kaden: That's really scary.

Alison Pill (Dr. Agnes Jurati): [Gene-editing tool] Crispr is one of the greatest innovations in our time. But it's genetic editing. The idea that we could pick and choose the best type of humans obviously hasn't had a great past. Anytime people say we know how to do this -- we know how to pick the best humans, I'm like, "Oh yeah, I'm worried."

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Star Trek: Picard , which is set 20 years after Stewart ' s stint on Star Trek: Next Generation, will give new screen life to the iconic TV astronaut at CBS All Where you can watch it if you don't have CBS All Access: If you don't live in the United States or Canada and thus don't have CBS All Access, you

Patrick Stewart ' s Captain Jean-Luc Picard is officially on his way back to Star Trek, and here' s everything we know so far. Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Star Trek are two things that practically go hand in hand, and yet, we never thought we’d be lucky enough to have them in the same vicinity

a group of people sitting at a table: Alison Pill, who plays Dr. Agnes Jurati opposite Patrick Stewart in Star Trek: Picard, gets nervous thinking about the future of gene-editing tools like Crispr. CBS © Provided by CNET Alison Pill, who plays Dr. Agnes Jurati opposite Patrick Stewart in Star Trek: Picard, gets nervous thinking about the future of gene-editing tools like Crispr. CBS

Santiago Cabrera (Cristóbal Rios): I stay away from the Siris and Alexas of this world.

Pill: You think you do, but it's in your pocket right now, my friend.

Marina Sirtis (Deanna Troi): I think (artificial intelligence) is terrifying. I don't understand why people have artificial intelligence in the home. Why? They can listen to you all the time. It just blows my mind. It's generational, because young people who've grown up with technology take it in stride. But old farts like me, I'm like, are they demented?

Jeri Ryan (Seven of Nine): AI is a little scary. It's all a little T2 (Terminator 2) for me.

Executive producer and co-creator Akiva Goldsman: The creation of viruses and the mutation of viruses, and deepfakes are pretty scary.

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Picard will likely be around the same age that Patrick Stewart is currently. Since so much time has passed, there are endless possibilities. For this Picard -focused series, it would be nice to address some of the unanswered questions. Such as, why is Data shown in “All Good Things ” yet seemingly

The man who led Star Trek into The Next Generation stopped beaming up to the Enterprise a while ago. But Patrick Stewart says he’d be willing to Maybe if someone came up with a brilliant idea, I’d do it. One thing that might interest me would be to bring all the existing casts of “ Star Trek” from the

Executive producer and co-creator Michael Chabon: Deepfakes are pretty scary. It's a perfect example of not taking the consequences and getting so caught up in the coolness and the amazingness of the thing you just figured out how to do. When you … share something with the world without actually thinking through what it's going to do to the world.

Michelle Hurd (Raffi Musiker): My brother-in-law always hates the fact that there are all these cameras around like Big Brother's watching, but I actually quite like it because I feel like you can track me if anything happens. I first thought that would be a scary thing …  like in London they have so many cameras all over. But I think there's something sort of secure about it that makes me feel a little secure.

Evan Evagora (Elnor): I'd say cybersecurity -- I don't think in terms of where we are moving in terms of the internet that our governments are really up to speed on that. You know identity theft, credit card -- your digital fingerprint is online forever. And I don't think we all understand the ramifications or impact of that yet because it's fairly new to us. The generation behind me will probably get a better sense of it because they're growing up with the internet being a thing.

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Thermaltake's latest gaming headset works with Alexa and Razer Chroma .
Thermaltake just introduced a gaming headset that's as much about showing off as it chatting with your gaming buddies. The Riing Pro RGB 7.1 steps up the competition against rival headsets with two-zone lighting you can control with both Alexa and Razer's Chroma system. You'll need a separate Alexa-ready device or Razer's Synapse software to make those respective features work, but this lets you color-coordinate without having to delve into settings between matches. You can even have Alexa match the headset color with the local weather conditions, in case you'd like your headset to be as blue as the sky.

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