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Technology Facebook has postponed ruining WhatsApp

04:41  18 january  2020
04:41  18 january  2020 Source:   bgr.com

WhatsApp self-destructing messages are coming soon, with a new name and settings

  WhatsApp self-destructing messages are coming soon, with a new name and settings The feature previously called Disappearing Messages is now Delete Messages, and there are new time options available.WABetaInfo found that in version 2.19.348 of the WhatsApp beta for Android, the self-destructing messages feature has been renamed. Previously known as Disappearing Messages, it's now called Delete Messages. The latest beta also changes the timeframes that can be used to automatically delete messages.

In a completely unexpected move, Facebook decided not to ruin WhatsApp for the time being. Facebook warned users back in the fall of 2018 that ads would be deployed inside WhatsApp , prompting some people to worry about the relationship between ads and end-to-end encryption.

WhatsApp has announced a number of changes to its terms and privacy policy – the first in four years – that allows the chat app to hand-over information to Facebook . Under the new changes, Facebook is able to see the phone number that people have associated with their WhatsApp account.

In a completely unexpected move, Facebook decided not to ruin WhatsApp for the time being. Facebook warned users back in the fall of 2018 that ads would be deployed inside WhatsApp, prompting some people to worry about the relationship between ads and end-to-end encryption. Facebook then reminded us, a few months later, that ads will start appearing in the popular chat app in 2020. But it turns out that Facebook has completely abandoned the idea of deploying advertising inside your chats for the time being.

a screenshot of a cell phone: Google WhatsApp YouTube, Gelsenkirchen, Germany – 15 Nov 2018© Provided by Penske Media Corporation Google WhatsApp YouTube, Gelsenkirchen, Germany – 15 Nov 2018

WhatsApp disbanded the team responsible for ads integration, people familiar with the matter told The Wall Street Journal. Moreover, the ad-related code was deleted from the app, which is great news for anyone who has preemptively annoyed at the prospect of seeing ads in the WhatsApp status bar.

Facebook backs off plan to plaster ads all over WhatsApp

  Facebook backs off plan to plaster ads all over WhatsApp The company still aims to bring ads to WhatsApp’s Status featureThe Journal notes that Facebook still ultimately aims to integrate ads into WhatsApp’s Status feature, but for now, the app will remain ad-free. The company’s desire to monetize WhatsApp, which it acquired for $22 billion in 2014, is part of what drove WhatsApp co-founder Jan Koum out of Facebook in 2018. His fellow co-founder Brian Acton left months earlier (over similar clashes related to privacy and targeted advertising) and has been a vocal critic of Facebook’s unchecked power since his departure.

WhatsApp prevailed primarily due to the simplicity, and barebones nature it has been able to sustain for the last decade. There are no superfluous However, things are different now for WhatsApp . It operates under Facebook , and for the past year, its actions have fomented several controversies

FACEBOOK has rolled-out a number of changes to Facebook Messenger, leaving its popular smartphone app feeling bloated and borderline WhatsApp - Hidden tricks and features you probably don't know, but definitely should be using. Facebook has crammed so many new features and

Facebook wasn’t going to break end-to-end encryption to deliver highly-targeted ads, the company said almost two years ago. WhatsApp would have remained just as secure as it is today (at least in theory). Not to mention that, more recently, Mark Zuckerberg pivoted towards end-to-end encryption for all of Facebook’s instant messaging apps, which should be linked at some point in the future.

The report notes that Facebook hasn’t canned the idea of monetizing WhatsApp with ads, but it’s no longer a priority, and it’s unclear when it will happen. Instead, Facebook plans to make money from the WhatsApp instant chat features it can offer businesses. Customer service features, as well as actual commerce, can be done via WhatsApp, which both users and retailers may appreciate in a world that’s increasingly reliant on instant messaging.

Facebook abandons plan to sell ads on WhatsApp, report says

  Facebook abandons plan to sell ads on WhatsApp, report says The company still aims to bring ads to WhatsApp's Status feature, according to The Wall Street Journal.In recent months, WhatsApp dissolved a team dedicated to figuring out how to best integrate ads onto the platform, people familiar with the matter told the Journal. That team's work was reportedly removed from WhatsApp's code.

At the time WhatsApp had less than million in revenue, gained through a 99 cents fee it charged its users under the proviso it would not sell its users’ Facebook lets you download all of the data it has on you, including the posts you’ve shared, your messages and photos, ads you’ve clicked on and

WhatsApp is by far Facebook 's largest acquisition and one of the biggest Silicon Valley has ever seen. It is over 20 times larger than Facebook ’s Instagram acquisition WhatsApp will help fuel Facebook growth in developing markets where internet connectivity is sparse but where WhatsApp is widely used.

The Journal also notes a second reason why Facebook may have canceled the ads project: The current WhatsApp terms of service, updated in 2016, after the Facebook purchase, but before WhatsApp cofounders left the company — Jan Koum and Brian Acton departed Facebook after clashes on advertising — prohibit ads in the app. Facebook would have to update those terms and face backlash from the public. Changing the terms of service quietly might not be an option for a company that’s had to deal with several PR issues in the past few years.

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Facebook-owned WhatsApp says it has 2 billion users .
The Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp said Wednesday it now has more than two billion users around the world, as it reaffirmed its stand on the need for strong encryption to protect privacy. WhatsApp, acquired by Facebook in 2014, has grown into one of the most-used services in the Facebook "family" of apps, touted its "strong encryption" that enables users to connect privately even amid calls by law enforcement in the United States and elsewhere to provide more access."We know that the more we connect, the more we have to protect," a WhatsApp blog said.

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