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Technology JDI's ultrathin biometric sensor is built for 'high security' authentication

16:50  21 january  2020
16:50  21 january  2020 Source:   engadget.com

Galaxy S11 might add yet another feature that the iPhone popularized

  Galaxy S11 might add yet another feature that the iPhone popularized Samsung is widely expected to launch several Galaxy S11 models in mid-February, and leaks have already spoiled many of the surprises. We know that Samsung is preparing a massive camera upgrade for the next-gen flagship, and we've seen the designs of the Galaxy S11e, S11, and S11+. The S11 is essentially a Galaxy Note 10 with an even bigger and more complex camera system. But an odd report notes that Samsung might do something totally unexpected with the Galaxy S11 and drop a key feature from its predecessor. As a result, the company might copy the iPhone’s most important change in recent years.

At 15 micrometers thick the sensor is as thin as paper and features both high -speed readout and high -resolution imaging capabilities. No word yet on its plans for commercialization, but the company expects the sensor will be integrated into high security authentication systems to help companies

JDI ' s ultrathin biometric sensor is built for ' high security ' authentication . This doesn't mean that all your iOS data is insecure, or that iCloud backups are completely insecure. As Apple explains, particularly sensitive data like your iCloud Keychain, networking passwords, health data, payment info

Japan Display, the company known for cramming massive screen resolutions into tiny spaces, has created the world's first ultrathin image sensor that measures fingerprints, veins and pulse waves. At 15 micrometers thick the sensor is as thin as paper and features both high-speed readout and high-resolution imaging capabilities.

  JDI's ultrathin biometric sensor is built for 'high security' authentication

According to the company, this makes it particularly well-suited to security applications, as well as data-sensitive wearables. Where other sensors operate with either biometric signals (pulse waves) or biometric information (fingerprints and veins), Japan Display's takes both into account. No word yet on its plans for commercialization, but the company expects the sensor will be integrated into high security authentication systems to help companies prevent impersonation attempts on important systems.

Japan Display

Google’s Nest will force customers to use two-factor authentication .
Starting this spring

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