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Technology What will it take for the government to protect your privacy?

13:00  22 january  2020
13:00  22 january  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

Twitter launches Privacy Center to explain what it's actually doing with your data

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Is 2020 the year when the government finally does something real to protect your privacy ? Amid all of this, one thing is apparent: It will take a lot more industry efforts—combined with stricter Federal intervention—to give consumers the data safeguards and level of privacy that ought to expect and so

What will it take for the government to protect your privacy ? Amid all of this, one thing is apparent: It will take a lot more industry efforts – combined with stricter Federal intervention – to give consumers the data safeguards and level of privacy that ought to expect and so richly deserve.

Is 2020 the year when the government finally does something real to protect your privacy? Up until now, it has been all on you, the consumer. 

When it comes to technology, it's not just Big Brother watching or even Big Tech. Your Fitbit tracker, Ring camera, Alexa voice assistant, Google searches – almost anyone seems to have access to the data of your life.

"You have zero privacy anyway." That's how then-Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy put it to reporters and analysts more than a couple of decades ago. 

Sen. Gillibrand wants to create a Data Protection Agency to secure your privacy

  Sen. Gillibrand wants to create a Data Protection Agency to secure your privacy The agency would be part of the Data Protection Act of 2020."The US needs a new approach to privacy and data protection," said Gillibrand in a press release Thursday. "We cannot allow our freedoms to be trampled over by private companies that value profits over people, and the Data Protection Agency would do that with expertise and resources to create and meaningfully enforce data protection rules and digital rights.

Are Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon – and government – doing enough to protect your privacy ? Is 2020 the year we'll see a federal privacy law?

Copyright protects original works of authorship, while a patent protects inventions or discoveries. When is my work protected ? Your work is under copyright protection the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.

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A majority of Americans say it is not possible to go through their daily lives without being tracked, according to a Pew Research study

Though we've grown accustomed to it, is it really something we should simply accept?  

"Just the fact that almost every day when we read the newspaper (and) see different concerning stories about privacy and security breaches, it would be almost impossible to conclude that enough is being done," Federal Trade Commissioner Rebecca Slaughter said during a privacy panel at the CES tech industry expo this month in Las Vegas. (She said the opinions were her own, not those of the FTC.)

Senate Democrats propose sweeping data privacy bill

  Senate Democrats propose sweeping data privacy bill WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats are proposing a broad federal data privacy law that would allow people to see what information companies have collected on them and demand that it be deleted. But the bill is likely to face bipartisan challenges in the Republican-controlled Senate. Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington is leading the effort. The bill, called the Consumer Online Privacy Rights Act, is similar to one set to take effect in California in January. But the federal bill would largely leave that and other state laws in place — a move that is certain to face opposition from the technology industry, which has been calling for a single federal data privacy law.

Is 2020 the year when the government finally does something real to protect your privacy ? Up until now, it has been all on you, the consumer. When it comes to today's technology, it 's not just Big Brother watching or even Big Tech. Your Fitbit tracker, Ring camera, Alexa voice assistant, Google …

We have laws to protect our health care records because we definitely don’t need strangers knowing our medical history. So why should we treat our online Congress also has a role. It should develop a clear privacy framework that sets one federal standard for the country and adheres to three simple

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U.S. lawmakers lag their European counterparts in getting legal heft behind consumer privacy protections. The European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, more commonly referred to as GDPR, went into effect in 2018. In this country, only California, whose privacy law took effect Jan. 1, is tackling this issue head-on.

Other states are all over the map when it comes to laws governing online privacy, according to rankings from the Comparitech security and privacy research firm.

Debate continues about whether the USA needs a privacy law that covers all 50 states.

"We would like to see a national law around this," said David Limp, Amazon's senior vice president for devices and services, during an interview at CES. "Because trying to implement it state by state, with nuances in every state that are slightly different, leaves a lot more room for subjective interpretation."

Senate Democrats propose sweeping data privacy bill

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Federal laws protect many retirement plans, but many types of protection are laid out by state laws—including protection for homesteads, annuities, and life insurance. One option for protecting your assets is to pull the equity out of them and put that cash into assets your state protects .

The FCC has taken the first step in a long process toward crafting new privacy protections for broadband customers. But what will the new rules mean What will the FCC privacy rules do? The new rules prohibit broadband providers from sharing your information, such as your name, location or

a person sitting on a couch: Apple privacy chief Jane Horvath speaks at CES. © Edward C. Baig Apple privacy chief Jane Horvath speaks at CES.

The feds aren't completely neutered. Last July, the FTC fined Facebook $5 billion, a record-breaking sum that was part of a settlement for violating consumer privacy, prompted by the scandal involving Cambridge Analytica in 2018. It was not the only data rupture to stain the company.

At CES, Erin Egan, Facebook's vice president and chief privacy officer, conceded that more needs to be done while talking up the social network’s expanded privacy checkup tool for consumers. 

Her counterpart at Apple, Senior Director for Global Privacy Jane Horvath – the public appearance by an Apple executive at CES was a rarity – reiterated the company’s long-standing commitment to “privacy-by-design” principles used across all its products.

But she agreed that “there’s no way to say that at this point in time, we’ve reached a panacea.”

Though the tech industry may be saying all the right things –  and in some instances doing something about it – critics aren't persuaded. 

The case for a privacy nutrition label

  The case for a privacy nutrition label Ghostery's President Jeremy Tillman shares his insights on what data privacy could look like in 2020.Ghostery is aiming to lead the way when it comes to how to better inform users regarding the privacy impact of digital services. TechRadar Pro spoke to company President Jeremy Tillman about this 'privacy nutrition label' as well as the company's decision to include a VPN in its new desktop app.

It is not a government 's job to protect online privacy . If people decide to put personal information on the Internet, it is their own choice. Also, people should be careful what kinds of services on the Internet they use. The government should have basic regulations about the Internet, but people should take

Digital privacy means different things to different people. And the expansive scope of the GDPR Ironically, these same critics often remain silent on the government ’s own privacy -invasive A 2005 study took advantage of the stark differences between Europe and the United States with respect to

Washington Post columnist Geoffrey A. Fowler calls such statements "privacy white-washing: when tech companies market control and transparency over data but continue gobbling it up." It's not what we need, he said.

Amazon and Google's ring of privacy fire

The devices and services we have given free rein in our homes and our lives to make things easier have, in too many cases, become portals to privacy violations.

In December, login names and passwords of more than 3,000 customers of Amazon-owned Ring were exposed. There have been frightening reports of hackers compromising the internet-connected cameras and doorbells.

A family in Mississippi claimed a hacker gained access to a Ring camera placed in their 8-year-old daughter's room and started talking to her. 

Ring said the incident was not related to a breach or compromise of its security but rather due to the fact that customers often use the same username and password for their various accounts and subscriptions, which bad actors may obtain elsewhere.

Regarding Ring, Amazon's Limp insists, "we've had very good security in place, including what I would consider best-in-class two-factor authentication."

But, he added, in some cases, "we needed to be more strict on the path (customers) took to put high security in place. So instead of an option of two-factor authentication moving forward, we're going to make it mandatory, a lot like your bank does."

Twitter introduces a Privacy Center to keep users informed

  Twitter introduces a Privacy Center to keep users informed Today, Twitter launched a Privacy Center, where it will share announcements, new privacy products and communication about inevitable security incidents. "By using Twitter, you've shown us that you trust us with your data," the Twitter Privacy Center states. "We do not take that trust lightly." Twitter is already putting the Privacy Center to use. In a post shared on the page, it explains that it is making a few privacy policy updates, effective January 1st. Those will comply with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CPPA), which requires large businesses to give consumers more transparency and control over their personal information, Reuters reports.

Here's how to protect your personal information. The government is not required to provide you with one. If you expect to encounter issues at the border, Wessler said, it Border agents asked her to unlock her laptop and phone, searched her computer, and then took her phone to another room for

On the national level, the FTC serves as the government 's chief privacy watchdog. But the agency is generally limited to enforcing the rules that Congress sets or "The FTC has been the nation’s lead law enforcement agency on consumer privacy for decades, and has taken extensive steps to protect

He said Amazon enabled a feature over the holidays that any new login attempt on a device that you already have installed will send you a notification to put in a code.

Always alert Alexa and Google Assistant have been caught listening when you might not have expected them to be, which wigs out many consumers. Amazon has long insisted its voice assistant is, essentially, holding its breath until it detects the "Alexa" wake word.

Limp claims Amazon is being more transparent. Amazon added an Alexa privacy dashboard portal, and you can tell Alexa to "delete what I just said." You can opt out of "human annotation," in which Amazon employees can listen to voice recordings in an effort to make the system better. Limp said only a fraction of 1% of data is seen by human eyes, and all personally identifiable information is removed from such recordings, so Amazon doesn't know it is you.

If you do nothing, he said, Amazon will keep your data in perpetuity.

Google added the ability to tell its Assistant to butt out by saying, “Hey, Google, that wasn’t for you,” which is supposed to give the Assistant a temporary case of amnesia. 

a person holding a sign posing for the camera: Federal Trade Commissioner Rebecca Slaughter says it doesn't look like enough is being done to protect people's privacy. © Edward C. Baig Federal Trade Commissioner Rebecca Slaughter says it doesn't look like enough is being done to protect people's privacy.

Protecting privacy is on you

Tech companies don't make it easy for the consumer.

“I’m a relatively well-educated person who specializes in privacy," Slaughter said, "and I can’t possibly figure out all the things that are being done with all my data across different services. And that’s just by the companies with whom I have a first-party relationship and doesn’t even think about the backbone infrastructure where there’s third-party data sharing."

The UK will fine technology companies who fail to protect children

  The UK will fine technology companies who fail to protect children Technology companies that have produced used by children will need to radically redesign their systems after the UK laid down new privacy standards. The Information Commissioner's Office's new code of conduct covers everyone from social media platforms to the makers of internet-connected toys. And failure to comply with the new rules, expected to come into force by 2021, will see hefty fines being meted out. The "Age Appropriate Design Code" hasThe "Age Appropriate Design Code" has 15 general principles of design that these companies will need to meet in order to protect children.

Do you think it ’s possible for the government to find a healthy balance between protecting the country and our privacy ? The government tries to play a role of them trying to protect us but are actually trying know what were doing at all time. This is why we have to state our information in

At the American Civil Liberties Union, privacy researcher Christopher Soghoian (TED Talk: How to avoid surveillance Read on for their tips about how to protect your online privacy and security: Will Potter: If I don’t have anything to We may not all be worried about the government , but there are

A network of data or information brokers collect, buy or sell your personal information, typically without your knowledge.

Almost no one reads a tech or other company's terms of service. Even if you do, you may need legal training to figure out what it all means.

Beyond the short-term violation of one's privacy, Slaughter frets about the “downstream harms,” decisions based on leaky data about your future job or credit prospects, for example, or “the targeting of content to consumers in ways that could be manipulative or problematic.”

Jeffrey R. Immelt wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Jeff Immelt, an executive at Tuya, says bad guys advance along with technology. © Edward C. Baig Jeff Immelt, an executive at Tuya, says bad guys advance along with technology.

And what's abundantly clear, tech evolution isn't just the domain of the well-meaning. "With every advancement in technology, the people who want to do bad things get more sophisticated as well," said Jeff Immelt, the longtime head of GE who works with smart home platform Tuya. He told USA TODAY he believes the good guys are keeping pace.

Chipping away at privacy: How technology made us bid farewell to privacy in the last decade

 Apple's Horvath rattled off some of the ways it strives to protect customer privacy. The company creates random numerical identifiers to mask data sent up to Apple’s servers when you use Siri or Maps.

Apple adheres to the mantra that privacy is a human right and uses the company's stance on privacy as a marketing tool.

Apple's position leads to friction with law enforcement when investigators seek access to evidence locked away in a privacy-infused device.

Amid all of this, one thing is apparent: It will take a lot more industry effort – combined with stricter federal intervention – to give consumers the data safeguards and level of privacy they ought to expect. 

Email: ebaig@usatoday.com; Follow@edbaig on Twitter

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: What will it take for the government to protect your privacy?

Facebook revamps Privacy Checkup with more granular account controls .
Facebook has given Privacy Checkup a fresh coat of paint and an overall upgrade, which makes it more helpful when it comes to keeping your account secure. When you access the feature -- simply search for "Privacy Checkup" on the platform to do so -- you'll now see four distinct topics to choose from. "Who Can See What You Share" walks you through your settings, so you can indicate who can see your posts and each piece of information you have on your profile. The feature now also includes quick ways to change your password and to switch on login alerts.

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