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Technology Facebook's new robot AI can get around efficiently without using a map

13:00  22 january  2020
13:00  22 january  2020 Source:   engadget.com

State police are testing out the use of Spot robot dogs

  State police are testing out the use of Spot robot dogs It brings a whole new meaning to K-9 units.The state's ACLU branch reached out to the Massachusetts State Police (MSP) requesting records regarding the acquisition and use of robotics. The request was made following a Facebook event the MSP Museum and Learning Center scheduled for July 30 called "Robotics Use in Law Enforcement." The ACLU received seven documents in return, including emails, scans of fiscal records, a "protection justification proposal for MSP" and a scan of a memo of an agreement between the department of fire services and the MSP bomb squad.

Facebook might have a solution. It recently developed a distributed reinforcement learning algorithm that not only reaches its destination 99.9 percent of the time without using maps , but The trick was to implement a new training method that scaled well and stayed in sync no matter what the workload.

Facebook abandoned an experiment after two artificially intelligent programs appeared to be chatting to each other in a strange language only they understood. The two chatbots came to create their own changes to English that made it easier for them to work

It's already possible for robots to navigate without maps, but having them navigate well is another matter. You don't want them to waste time backtracking, let alone fall down if they bump into an unexpected obstacle. Facebook might have a solution. It recently developed a distributed reinforcement learning algorithm that not only reaches its destination 99.9 percent of the time without using maps, but can do so with just a three percent deviation from the ideal path. DD-PPO (Decentrialized Distributed Proximal Policy Optimization), as it's called, doesn't need more than a standard RGB camera with depth data, GPS and a compass.

Oh great, that robot dog the internet freaked out over has joined a police squad

  Oh great, that robot dog the internet freaked out over has joined a police squad At this point, Boston Dynamics' robot dog Spot is an expert in effortlessly ginning up virality and setting the internet abuzz over videos of its latest exploits. We've covered many of those developments here, from the time the robot was able to start opening doors to its ability to do parkour -- the viral gold that memes are made of. Now, this very good (albeit also terrifying) boy is at it again. It seems the robot dog is now an official member of the Massachusetts State Police’s bomb squad, which, of course, begs the question: Bad boys, bad boys, whatcha gonna do, whatcha gonna do when the unstoppable canine cop gets sicced on you? require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"]

Reports have been flying around of these robots creating their own sinister coded language, along with incomprehensible snippets of intriguing exchanges between the two of them. What Bob and Alice have developed is the AI equivalent. Humanoid robot arrives in the UK. Sadly this is the end of Bob and Alice' s story, as we learn that Facebook has ultimately decided to require that Get in touch.

Facebook ’ s AI lab, FAIR, has released a new dataset named Talk the Walk, which asks AI agents to guide a virtual tourist around New York City. We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze

  Facebook's new robot AI can get around efficiently without using a map

The trick was to implement a new training method that scaled well and stayed in sync no matter what the workload. Previous projects tend to struggle without massive computational power. Facebook taught a virtual agent to handle point-to-point navigation for the equivalent of 80 years of human experience -- that's about 2.5 billion steps. The result is an algorithm that, in indoor environments, is smart enough to choose the right fork in the path and quickly recognize errors when it does head in the wrong direction. It's learning to understand the "structural regularities" of buildings, Facebook speculated.

The technology is still very young. It has yet to handle outdoors or complex situations, and it doesn't handle long-distance navigation well if it has to lose sensors. Facebook is sharing its work in hopes of further advances, though. If that happens, it could not only help robots move gracefully from room to room, but help with augmented reality glasses and other systems that help you navigate unfamiliar spaces.

Facebook Artificial Intelligence

Scientists gave robots the ability to sweat .
Evolution has given humans a number of cool bodily functions to deal with certain circumstances. Sweating, for example, is a way for our bodies to cool down, as moist skin allows air to wick away heat much more efficiently than dry skin. It's something that we take for granted, but when scientists are designing robots to be ever more like humans, it's something that has to be considered. Now, researchers from Cornell University have developed a robotic hand that is equipped with fingers for gripping objects. That on its own isn’t particularly impressive, but these soft robo-fingers do something that is entirely new: they sweat.

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