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Technology Facebook: Creators must disclose paid partnerships with political campaigns

18:50  14 february  2020
18:50  14 february  2020 Source:   engadget.com

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Influencers have had to disclose paid partnerships for a while, but usually those are for products. Sponsored content, even paid political memes, will not be archived in Facebook 's political Ad Library, unless the creator pays to boost the post, a Facebook spokesperson told The Verge.

Facebook decided Friday to allow a type of paid political message that had sidestepped many of the social network's rules governing political ads. Until Friday, Facebook tried to deter campaigns from using such branded content by barring them from using a tool designed to help advertisers run such

Mike Bloomberg's ploy to reach voters through bad Instagram memes may be tacky, but it is not violating any Facebook or Instagram rules, as long as creators disclose paid partnerships. "After hearing from multiple campaigns, we agree that there's a place for branded content in political discussion on our platforms," Facebook said in a statement provided to Engadget.

a man standing in front of a crowd

Influencers have had to disclose paid partnerships for a while, but usually those are for products. Now, they'll have to do the same thing when they're pushing paid political content.

Facebook previously prohibited political entities from posting branded content because its policies were written for all forms of monetization, including both ads and sponsored content, and the company didn't want to be seen as supporting any candidate. This isn't a problem with branded content, though, as Facebook isn't involved in the actual transaction.

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(Update: Former Facebook VP of ads Andrew Bosworth (AKA Boz) released some limited data showing that the Trump campaign actually paid And regardless of who was paying more or less, the argument stands that the process by which these amounts are arrived at should be publicly disclosed

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Sponsored content, even paid political memes, will not be archived in Facebook's political Ad Library, unless the creator pays to boost the post, a Facebook spokesperson told The Verge. Because paid partnerships like Bloomberg's memes won't be considered political ads, they'll be subject to slightly different rules. For now, these guidelines apply only in the US.

Facebook's full statement is below:

"Branded content is different from advertising, but in either case we believe it's important people know when they're seeing paid content on our platforms. That's why we have an Ad Library where anyone can see who paid for an ad and why we require creators to disclose any paid partnerships through our branded content tools. After hearing from multiple campaigns, we agree that there's a place for branded content in political discussion on our platforms. We're allowing US-based political candidates to work with creators to run this content, provided the political candidates are authorized and the creators disclose any paid partnerships through our branded content tools."

Facebook won’t catalog sponsored Mike Bloomberg memes as political ads .
Bloomberg’s bad memes might just be the beginningBefore Friday, Facebook didn’t have any guidelines for influencers who create sponsored content for politicians and political campaigns. But after Mike Bloomberg’s presidential campaign was found to have paid popular Instagram meme pages for posts, Facebook decided to allow these political paid partnerships.

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