•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Zuckerberg agrees Facebook will have to pay more tax in Europe, report says

19:20  14 february  2020
19:20  14 february  2020 Source:   cnet.com

Mark Zuckerberg's New Year's resolution: No more annual challenges

  Mark Zuckerberg's New Year's resolution: No more annual challenges For the past decade, Facebook's CEO has pushed himself to learn mandarin, run and code artificial intelligence software for his home.Zuckerberg's personal challenges, which came across as equal parts honest new year's resolution and cynical PR ploy to make him seem more personable, have been an annual tradition for the 35-year old Facebook co-founder for more than a decade. In the past, he's pushed himself to learn to hunt and cook, read more books and improve his public speaking.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is set to concede in a speech on Saturday that the tech giant should pay more tax in Europe, according to a report in the Times on Friday.

Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Zuckerberg appears on board with paying more tax. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images© Provided by CNET Zuckerberg appears on board with paying more tax. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The social network chief is scheduled to speak at a security conference in Munich where he's expected express understanding over Europe's frustrations and accept that his company may need to increase its contributions.

Several British newspapers were shown excerpts of the speech ahead of the event. Facebook didn't respond to a request for comment confirming the reported contents of Zuckerberg's speech.

Mark Zuckerberg's 2020 resolution: No more annual goals

  Mark Zuckerberg's 2020 resolution: No more annual goals This year, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says he resolved not to set an annual resolution. © Susan Walsh/AP Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg arrives for a hearing before the House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, to discuss his plans for the new cryptocurrency Libra. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) It's a departure from an annual tradition that Zuckerberg started in 2009 when he announced his goal for the year on Facebook: to wear a tie to work every day to show just how serious he was about Facebook's growth.

Facebook and other large digital tech companies, including Amazon and Google, are under pressure from countries around the world for not paying what is perceived to be their share of taxes. Currently, digital companies are only required to pay tax on their profits in companies where they have a physical headquarters. This allows them to take refuge in countries such as Ireland, which is popular among US tech companies due to its relatively low taxes.

Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Zuckerberg is on board with paying more tax.© Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Zuckerberg is on board with paying more tax.

A group of 137 countries is currently trying to overhaul current corporate tax rules in order to force digital companies to pay more tax on their products and services in all the countries where they operate. Such plans have been attacked by President Donald Trump as being discriminatory towards US companies. Trump has threatened countries developing their own taxation plans with tariffs and warned that levies may affect future trade deals.

Facebook backs off plan to plaster ads all over WhatsApp

  Facebook backs off plan to plaster ads all over WhatsApp The company still aims to bring ads to WhatsApp’s Status featureThe Journal notes that Facebook still ultimately aims to integrate ads into WhatsApp’s Status feature, but for now, the app will remain ad-free. The company’s desire to monetize WhatsApp, which it acquired for $22 billion in 2014, is part of what drove WhatsApp co-founder Jan Koum out of Facebook in 2018. His fellow co-founder Brian Acton left months earlier (over similar clashes related to privacy and targeted advertising) and has been a vocal critic of Facebook’s unchecked power since his departure.

Earlier this month, under such a threat, France agreed to postpone the introduction of its digital tax until the end of the year. Meanwhile, the UK is currently considering its own options for asking tech companies operating in the country to contribute more.

Leading the charge for tax reform is the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which said changes could bring in around $100 billion extra in global tax revenue.

"We want the OECD process to succeed so that we have a stable and reliable system going forward," Zuckerberg will reportedly say Saturday. "We accept that may mean we have to pay more tax and pay it in different places."

The OECD aims to reach an agreement by the end of the year, which it hopes will boost revenue across the board while avoiding trade wars between the US and countries keen on implementing changes more hastily.

Clinton says Zuckerberg has 'authoritarian' views on Facebook ads, misinformation

  Clinton says Zuckerberg has 'authoritarian' views on Facebook ads, misinformation Hillary Clinton criticized Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and the social media giant in a new interview, calling the top executive's views "authoritarian" and saying that the platform "intend[s] to reelect" President Trump. Clinton said that her 2016 presidential campaign did not "understand what was going on below the radar screen," at an event Saturday at the Sundance Film Festival, including alleged conspiracy theories, sexist claims and other lies the former secretary of State claims were spread about her online.

One of Mark Zuckerberg’s notebooks detailed ‘dark profiles,’ which would let people make Facebook profiles for their friends .
Wired got its hands on one of Zuckerberg’s journalsDetails about the journal come from Wired editor at large Steven Levy, who is publishing a book about the history of Facebook and published an excerpt of that book in Wired today. The full excerpt has all sorts of juicy details about Facebook and Zuckerberg.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 4
This is interesting!