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Technology Google might start paying news publishers for content

20:00  14 february  2020
20:00  14 february  2020 Source:   theverge.com

YouTube reportedly considered screening all YouTube Kids videos

  YouTube reportedly considered screening all YouTube Kids videos YouTube paid the FTC a $170 million fine this year, which was pocket change for Google. However, the charge of violating the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act will remain a very costly stain on its reputation. In fact, things got so bad for YouTube when it came to kids last year that the site reportedly considered individual screening for every YouTube Kids video, according to Bloomberg. YouTube had reportedly assembled a team of 40 employees with the code-name Crosswalk, in reference to the numerous dangerous content "streets" on the site.

Google is chatting with publishers about potentially paying to include their content in a news product, according to The Wall Street Journal. Most of the talks are with publishers outside the US, the paper says, including in France and Europe more broadly.

  Google might start paying news publishers for content © Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

“We want to help people find quality journalism—it’s important to informed democracy and helps support a sustainable news industry,” Google said in a statement to the Journal. “We care deeply about this and are talking with partners and looking at more ways to expand our ongoing work with publishers, building on programmes like our Google News Initiative.”

Google is killing digital magazines in News

  Google is killing digital magazines in News Google News will no longer offer a paid magazine subscriptions. According to Android Police, the News team sent out an email to customers, telling them that the company is killing print-replica magazines in Google News. A company spokesperson has confirmed the change to Engadget, noting that the program worked with under 200 publishers. Subscribers won't be able to purchase new magazine issues anymore, but they can thankfully still keep accessing old issues (PDFs and other formats) in the Google News app via the Following or Favorites tab. In addition, the tech giant is refunding subscribers their latest payment within 30 days.

Google has struggled with fake news making it into its news product in the past, and in 2018, it launched its Google News Initiative to combat the issue. The company has also been battling with news organizations in Europe, and France specifically, over a copyright law that requires the tech companies to pay to preview articles. Google has said it won’t pay and instead will change how it displays news.

Whatever this potential news product is wouldn’t be the first time Google paid publishers. Last year, the tech company began licensing audio news from publishers like ABC, Cheddar, The Associated Press, CNN, Fox News Radio, PBS, Reuters, WYNC, and a bunch of local radio stations. Google pays the companies to create audio in a specific format that works with Google Assistant.

Other tech companies, like Facebook and Apple, have experimented with paying publishers for content, although that hasn’t rescued the media industry as a whole. Google and Facebook still collect most advertising revenue, leaving publishers to have to figure out new moneymaking strategies. Licensing fees don’t make up for that ad revenue loss.

Google might finally pay news outlets for their content .
Google is considering paying news publishers for their content, The Wall Street Journal reports. The company is reportedly in talks with publishers about licensing fees. The details are still sparse, but it sounds like Google could be working on a news subscription service like Apple News+. "We want to help people find quality journalism—it's important to informed democracy and helps support a sustainable news industry," Google said in a"We want to help people find quality journalism—it's important to informed democracy and helps support a sustainable news industry," Google said in a statement shared by WSJ.

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