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Technology Intel outlines chip that will make quantum computers smaller and faster

18:30  19 february  2020
18:30  19 february  2020 Source:   engadget.com

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Intel is determined to play an important role in quantum computing , and it just outlined a component that will play a key part in that strategy. It should lead to smaller (or at least, more efficient) quantum computers by allowing one chip to handle more tasks without as many cables and rack

Intel said it has created a cryogenic control chip , code-named Horse Ridge, that will And Amazon Web Services outlined a quantum marketplace. Quantum practicality refers to the state where quantum computing can handle problems that conventional computers can't at a much faster pace.

Intel is determined to play an important role in quantum computing, and it just outlined a component that will play a key part in that strategy. Intel and QuTech have provided some technical details for Horse Ridge, a previously-teased cryogenic control chip that should make quantum computers, smaller, faster and with less aggressive cooling. It won't lead to the dream of a true quantum computer, but it should get Intel considerably closer to that goal.

a man holding a sign

The system-on-chip is based on Intel's 22-nanometer FinFET Low Power process and includes four radio frequency channels that can control a total of 128 qubits. That may not sound like a lot, but it's more than double the 49 qubits Intel was boasting for its Tangle Lake test chip back in early 2018. It should lead to smaller (or at least, more efficient) quantum computers by allowing one chip to handle more tasks without as many cables and rack instrumentations.

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"Today, quantum researchers work with just a small number of qubits, using smaller , custom-designed systems Intel 's Horse Ridge greatly minimizes this complexity. By systematically working to scale to Applying quantum computing to practical problems hinges on the ability to scale to, and control

Chips are made from metal wires and semiconductor-based transistors — tiny electronic There are a number of breakthrough candidates, like quantum computing , which — if it became practical Ultra-low-power computer chips that will begin to appear at the end of this decade will in some cases not

You can also expect faster, higher-fidelity qubits. Intel said Horse Ridge has "optimized" multiplexing that allows it to both scale and reduce the crosstalk errors that pop up when handling larger numbers of qubits at different frequencies. There should be greater accuracy and better overall performance. The chip can handle a wide frequency range, too, including superconducting qubits around 6GHz to 7GHz and smaller spin qubits at 13GHz to 20GHz.

Quantum computers that use Horse Ridge might not need to stay so cold, either. Intel is hoping to use silicon spin qubits that can operate at temperatures as "high" as 1 kelvin (just above -458F), and Horse Ridge "paves the way" for making a single package that combines those qubits with their controls.

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(Reuters) - Quantum computers aim to carry out tasks in just a few minutes that would take today’s best conventional computers thousands of years. The company hopes the chip will make its quantum computers more practical to produce in the future. “ Intel recognized that quantum controls

Intel Labs, in collaboration with QuTech ‑ a partnership between TU Delft and TNO (Netherlands "Today, quantum researchers work with just a small number of qubits, using smaller Applying quantum computing to practical problems hinges on the ability to scale to, and control, thousands of

As we've mentioned in the past, it's estimated that a full-fledged quantum computer would need over 1 million qubits to be viable. Intel said in 2018 that it didn't expect such chips to even be on the radar for another five to seven years, and that's still a long while off. Horse Ridge shows how Intel is progressing toward that goal, though, and there are still tasks quantum computers can perform in the near term that might be impractical for conventional systems.

Intel Newsroom

Intel Wants Chip Customers to Feel the Need for Speed Again .
Company touts speeds over 5 gigahertz. Industry stopped focusing on clock speed years ago.The world’s biggest chipmaker is touting the clock speed of its new H line of processors, citing their ability to process data at more than 5 gigahertz, or 5 billion cycles a second.

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