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Technology Looking to Nevada, will Dems avoid mistakes of Iowa?

23:25  21 february  2020
23:25  21 february  2020 Source:   msn.com

Biden campaign calls for answers from Iowa Dems after delays in caucus results

  Biden campaign calls for answers from Iowa Dems after delays in caucus results Former Vice President Joe Biden's (D) campaign called on the Iowa Democratic Party to provide answers about issues that plagued Monday night's caucuses across the state after results were delayed. © Greg Nash Biden campaign calls for answers from Iowa Dems after delays in caucus results In an email to party officials obtained by CBS News, the Biden campaign's general counsel pointed to "considerable flaws" in the caucus system that resulted in both the party's app for reporting caucus results as well as a back-up phone line to fail Monday evening.

The Nevada Democratic Party has vowed “to have the most accessible, most expansive and transparent caucus” in state history following the chaotic Iowa Democratic caucus, a spokesperson for the party told CNN on Tuesday.

Plans for the Nevada caucus on February 22 had to be altered quickly after the chaotic situation with Iowa 's caucus. According to a Nevada Independent report, a video recording of a caucus volunteer training session on Saturday revealed the new tool that will help calculate results.

UNDATED (AP) — Nevada Democrats are hoping to avoid a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa caucuses, as voters gather across the Silver State on Saturday to make their presidential preferences known. Iowa's process cratered this month following a rushed effort by state Democrats to deploy a mobile app for caucus volunteers to report results. Democrats in Nevada were going to use the same app developer as Iowa did, but quickly sidelined those plans. They will still be relying to some extent on technology to assist in counting and reporting results, though, and like Iowa, they will have paper backups.

Nevada Democrats said to have new 'caucus tool' to track results

  Nevada Democrats said to have new 'caucus tool' to track results Nevada party officials are apparently trying to avoid the tabulating and reporting debacle that dogged the Iowa caucus.The party was quick to point out during volunteer summits on Saturday that the new tool isn't an app, like the one that delayed results for days during the Iowa caucus earlier this month. Instead, precinct chairs will be given iPads disconnected from the internet with preloaded with the new tool.

In Iowa , the Biden campaign’s use of non-Iowan volunteers as precinct captains was a necessary stopgap to ensure that every one of the state’s roughly Biden, who finished in an embarrassing fourth place in Iowa and fifth in the New Hampshire primary, is currently polling further and further behind Sen.

In Nevada , party leaders are acutely aware of the failures of Iowa and are keen not to repeat those mistakes in Saturday's caucuses. Courtesy of Nevada Democrats The iPads mimic the paper step-by-step guides that precinct leaders have. So as they move through the caucus process, they click

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2020, file photo sign in on tablet computers at an early voting location in the Chinatown Plaza, in Las Vegas. Nevada Democrats are hoping to avoid a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa caucuses, as voters gather across the Silver State on Saturday to make their presidential preferences known. Iowa's process cratered this month following a rushed effort by state Democrats to deploy a mobile app for caucus volunteers to report results. Democrats in Nevada were going to use the same app developer as Iowa did, but quickly sidelined those plans. They will still be relying to some extent on technology to assist in counting and reporting results, though, and like Iowa, they will have paper backups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2020, file photo sign in on tablet computers at an early voting location in the Chinatown Plaza, in Las Vegas. Nevada Democrats are hoping to avoid a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa caucuses, as voters gather across the Silver State on Saturday to make their presidential preferences known. Iowa's process cratered this month following a rushed effort by state Democrats to deploy a mobile app for caucus volunteers to report results. Democrats in Nevada were going to use the same app developer as Iowa did, but quickly sidelined those plans. They will still be relying to some extent on technology to assist in counting and reporting results, though, and like Iowa, they will have paper backups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Questions and answers about Nevada's preparations:

After the caucus meltdown in Iowa, Democrats in Nevada fear a repeat

  After the caucus meltdown in Iowa, Democrats in Nevada fear a repeat Janet Jackson announced Monday (Feb. 10) that she'll be hitting the road in 2020 for a new world tour in support of her forthcoming twelfth studio album, 'Black Diamond.'

The Nevada Democratic Party said on Tuesday that for its Feb. 22 presidential caucuses they will not be using the same app or vendor that led to delayed reporting of Iowa 's "NV Dems can confidently say that what happened in the Iowa caucus last night will not happen in Nevada on February 22nd.

'Lessons learned from Iowa '. She also said Nevada would not be using the same app as the one The Nevada Democratic Party announced it was holding training sessions to avoid any issues like in Justin and Hailey Bieber spotted checking out million Brentwood home they're ' looking to buy'

HOW SIMILAR IS THE NEVADA CAUCUS PROCESS TO IOWA'S?

Very similar, which is why there are concerns about a potential repeat of the problems. As in Iowa, the Nevada caucuses are run by the state Democratic party. By contrast, primaries and general elections are run by government officials. And just like in Iowa, precinct captains in Nevada will be asked for the first time to report results from every stage of the process, revealing how the results are calculated.

One important difference is that Nevada has had four days of early voting, in which some 75,000 voters have already cast ballots. It's a considerable number given 84,000 people attended Democratic caucuses in 2016. It is the first time the Nevada caucuses have had early voting. On Saturday, those votes will be merged with caucus votes at neighborhood precincts — a complicated step that some election observers say could trip up volunteers running the caucuses.

Nevada Democrats turn to Scantron-style paper ballots after Caucus Day chaos in Iowa

  Nevada Democrats turn to Scantron-style paper ballots after Caucus Day chaos in Iowa The move sheds new light on long-awaited plans to avoid an Iowa-style voting debacleA memo sent to campaigns on Monday confirms early voters will fill out paper ballots that will later be sent to party-run “processing hubs” for scanning and storage.

Nevada holds the next Democratic nominating contest, on Feb. 22, and the differences with Iowa will go far beyond how the results are tabulated. The caucuses next week will pose a test for former Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Senator Amy Klobuchar, who are coming out of Iowa and New Hampshire

The Iowa caucuses remained in flux Wednesday, but two candidates appeared to emerge. With its caucuses about two weeks away, Nevada ’s Democratic Party is assessing plans for reporting results, scrambling to meet a tight timeline now that it has ditched an app like the one that upended Iowa ’s

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2020, file photo, a woman votes at an early voting location at the culinary workers union hall  in Las Vegas. Nevada Democrats are hoping to avoid a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa caucuses, as voters gather across the Silver State on Saturday to make their presidential preferences known. Iowa's process cratered this month following a rushed effort by state Democrats to deploy a mobile app for caucus volunteers to report results. Democrats in Nevada were going to use the same app developer as Iowa did, but quickly sidelined those plans. They will still be relying to some extent on technology to assist in counting and reporting results, though, and like Iowa, they will have paper backups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2020, file photo, a woman votes at an early voting location at the culinary workers union hall in Las Vegas. Nevada Democrats are hoping to avoid a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa caucuses, as voters gather across the Silver State on Saturday to make their presidential preferences known. Iowa's process cratered this month following a rushed effort by state Democrats to deploy a mobile app for caucus volunteers to report results. Democrats in Nevada were going to use the same app developer as Iowa did, but quickly sidelined those plans. They will still be relying to some extent on technology to assist in counting and reporting results, though, and like Iowa, they will have paper backups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

COULD NEVADA EXPERIENCE THE SAME PROBLEMS THAT HOBBLED IOWA’S CAUCUSES?

In Iowa, the inability of some caucus organizers to download the app on their phones, or to use it successfully, triggered a flood of calls to the party’s hotline and dramatically slowed the process of reporting results. And a coding issue within the mobile app muddied the data that was sent in, creating discrepancies that halted the reporting of initial results for nearly 24 hours.

Nevada Democrats to use iPads loaded with Google Forms to track caucus

  Nevada Democrats to use iPads loaded with Google Forms to track caucus Party has a two-step plan intended to avoid the reporting chaos of the Iowa caucus.The app will be loaded onto 2,000 iPads purchased by the party and distributed to precinct chairs, according to a memo signed by party Executive Director Alana Mounce seen by the Associated Press Thursday. Google's app will calculate and submit results electronically, while a second step will rely on submissions also being made by phone.

In Nevada, caucus organizers will not need to download anything, but they will be asked to work on an iPad and navigate a Google form designed to integrate early voters into the in-person caucus process and calculate results. The Google app and iPads are trusted commercial tech tools, but election experts have warned that deploying any technology late in the process, like Nevada did, increases the risk of problems. Paper records of the early vote will be available if needed.

Volunteers say that hands-on training with the iPads and the Google form wasn’t even available until late Tuesday, giving little time for people, particularly those who are not tech-savvy, to practice.

HOW WILL THE CAUCUSES BE CONDUCTED?

Caucuses are different from primary elections. In a primary, voters go to the polls, cast ballots and leave. At a caucus, voters gather at local precincts and declare support for their chosen candidate. Then, some have an opportunity to switch sides.

Here, in four steps, is how it will unfold in Nevada.

1. The “first alignment": Voters arriving at their caucus site will fill out a card that lists their first choice, and those results will be tabulated.

2. Switching if necessary: Caucus-goers whose first-choice candidate fails to get at least 15% of the vote can switch their support to a different candidate. If these voters don’t choose another candidate, their vote won’t count in the final alignment.

Nevada Democrats report high early caucus participation

  Nevada Democrats report high early caucus participation Nearly 75,000 Nevadans participated early in the state's Democratic U.S. presidential nominating contest.People participate in the Democratic caucus early vote at the polling station of Cheyenne High School in Las Vegas, on Feb. 18.

3. The “final alignment": The results of this stage will be tabulated to determine the caucuses’ “final alignment.” Only candidates who receive at least 15% of the vote at that precinct — the so-called viable candidates — will be counted in the final alignment. Non-viable candidates get zero votes in the final alignment.

4. Calculating delegates. The final alignment votes are then used to calculate the number of county convention delegates awarded to each candidate. (Each precinct has a certain number of county delegates to award). Nevada will award 36 pledged delegates to the Democratic National Convention, based on the number of county convention delegates each candidate wins, both statewide and in individual congressional districts.

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2020, file photo, people wait in line at an early voting location in the Chinatown Plaza, in Las Vegas. Nevada Democrats are hoping to avoid a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa caucuses, as voters gather across the Silver State on Saturday to make their presidential preferences known. Iowa's process cratered this month following a rushed effort by state Democrats to deploy a mobile app for caucus volunteers to report results. Democrats in Nevada were going to use the same app developer as Iowa did, but quickly sidelined those plans. They will still be relying to some extent on technology to assist in counting and reporting results, though, and like Iowa, they will have paper backups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2020, file photo, people wait in line at an early voting location in the Chinatown Plaza, in Las Vegas. Nevada Democrats are hoping to avoid a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa caucuses, as voters gather across the Silver State on Saturday to make their presidential preferences known. Iowa's process cratered this month following a rushed effort by state Democrats to deploy a mobile app for caucus volunteers to report results. Democrats in Nevada were going to use the same app developer as Iowa did, but quickly sidelined those plans. They will still be relying to some extent on technology to assist in counting and reporting results, though, and like Iowa, they will have paper backups. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

WHAT RESULTS WILL DEMOCRATS RELEASE OUT OF THE CAUCUSES?

Nevada Democrats in overdrive to avoid Iowa repeat

  Nevada Democrats in overdrive to avoid Iowa repeat The Nevada Democratic Party is taking dramatic steps under intense pressure to avoid the mistakes that plagued the Iowa caucuses earlier this month as tens of thousands of voters prepare to hit more than 250 caucus sites around the state on Saturday. © Getty Images Nevada Democrats in overdrive to avoid Iowa repeat After the Iowa debacle - which delayed the final results for several days and sparked widespread confusion as to who the victor was in the race - Democrats in the Silver State have set up special phone banks, dispatched hundreds of tech-knowledgeable volunteers and simplified the caucus calculating and reporting proc

There will be three sets of results:

—Tallies of the “first alignment” of caucus-goers;

—The caucus-goers' “final alignment”;

—The total number of delegates to county conventions won by candidates.

The first and final alignment results aren’t new, but this is the first time the party has made them public.

HOW WILL THE AP DECLARE THE WINNER OF THE NEVADA CAUCUSES?

The AP will declare the winner of the Nevada caucuses based on the number of county convention delegates each candidate receives. That’s because Democrats choose their overall nominee based on delegates. The other results will provide valuable insights into the process and the strength of candidates, but the county delegates have the most direct bearing on the metric Democrats use to pick their nominee. So that’s the number to watch.

However, the AP will report all three results as they are released.

COULD RESULTS BE DELAYED LIKE IOWA?

It's possible. Party officials have said they will be guided by accuracy over speed. Factors that include the integration of early votes into the process and potentially high turnout, could affect the tabulation and timing of results. Early voting is a complicated step that Iowa did not attempt, and there’s been some uncertainty about how early voters would be included in later stages of the caucus process.

If everything goes smoothly with the iPads and the Google forms, this part of the process could go quickly. But if volunteers are left to rely on complex instructions and doing math by hand, it could slow everything down.

WHY ARE DEMOCRATS MAKING THIS CHANGE?

The new rules were mandated by the Democratic National Committee as part of a package of changes sought by Bernie Sanders following his loss to Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential primaries. The changes were designed to make the caucus system more transparent and to make sure that even the lowest-performing candidates get public credit for all the votes they receive.

This story corrects a question on declaring a winner to Nevada caucuses, not Iowa caucuses.

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Nevada Democrats skirt chaos that plagued Iowa caucuses .
After the chaos of the Iowa caucuses, Democrats were desperate to avoid another fiasco in Nevada. And early indications Saturday were that they succeeded. Enough preliminary results came in to allow The Associated Press and other news organizations to declare Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont the caucus winner by early evening in Nevada.

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