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Technology Spectrum offers free internet so students can do classwork at home

02:40  17 march  2020
02:40  17 march  2020 Source:   engadget.com

FCC gives Google and Sony permission to dole out 3.5GHz spectrum

  FCC gives Google and Sony permission to dole out 3.5GHz spectrum The FCC just gave Google, Sony and two other companies the greenlight to open the 3.5GHz band to commercial use. Considered by many as a building block for 5G networks, the 3.5GHz band could speed up 4G communication and enhance 5G networks, helping the latest iPhone and Android devices reach faster data speeds in the US. The FCC named Google, Sony, CommScope and Federated Wireless, Inc. Spectrum Access System (SAS) Administrators. They're nowThe FCC named Google, Sony, CommScope and Federated Wireless, Inc. Spectrum Access System (SAS) Administrators. They're now authorized to make a slice of the 3.

Installation is free for new student households. With school systems across the US closing down in response to the coronavirus pandemic, Spectrum says it will provide free internet access to students who currently don't use its service.

Students without home access squeeze in a little more time online whenever possible, sometimes by skipping lunch Every fall, students are shown how to download assignments from Blackboard before they leave school, so they can complete them offline at home and then upload them again the next day.

With school systems across the US closing down in response to the coronavirus pandemic, Spectrum says it will provide free internet access to students who currently don't use its service. The company will install broadband and WiFi in new student households free of charge and provide access for 60 days. The offer is available to families with both K-12 and college students.

a person sitting on a couch

The company says it will also open its WiFi hotspots to the public. Spectrum Internet service is available in 41 states across the country.

Charter Communications, the parent company of Spectrum, was one of the telecoms that took up the FCC's Keep Americans Connected Pledge last week. As part of the pledge, it said it wouldn't cancel service for people who have trouble paying their bills as a result of the current outbreak. The company agreed to waive late fees for the time being as well. Like Charter, some companies have tried to do more than the FCC asked for. For instance, this weekend MVNO Mint Mobile started giving out free data to anyone who needs it.

Charter Communications

Internet Archive's 'national emergency library' has over a million books to read right now .
The Internet Archive is suspending its waiting lists for books. "Users will be able to borrow books from the National Emergency Library without joining a waitlist, ensuring that students will have access to assigned readings and library materials that the Internet Archive has digitized," according to a blog post.

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This is interesting!