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Technology Facebook bug marked legitimate coronavirus info as spam

01:05  19 march  2020
01:05  19 march  2020 Source:   engadget.com

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Facebook 's head of safety said on Tuesday a bug was responsible for posts on topics including coronavirus being erroneously marked as spam , prompting widespread complaints from users of both its flagship app and photo-sharing app Instagram. "This is a bug in an anti- spam system, unrelated to.

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook 's head of safety said on Tuesday a bug was responsible for posts on topics including coronavirus being erroneously marked as spam , prompting widespread complaints from users of both its flagship app and photo-sharing app Instagram.

Facebook was quick to say that it would fight coronavirus misinformation, but yesterday, one tool appeared to go haywire. Users reported that Facebook was marking posts with legitimate information and articles about the coronavirus as spam. According to The Verge, Facebook has resolved the issue and restored the posts that were incorrectly removed, but this is a serious glitch at a time when so many people are looking for accurate information on the coronavirus and COVID-19.

a man holding a phone

According to Guy Rosen, vice president of integrity at Facebook, the issue was due to a bug in an anti-spam system. It did not have to do with the fact that Facebook is leaning more heavily on its machine learning systems for content moderation, a strategy Google has also resorted to. Apparently, the bug removed non-coronavirus posts, too. All of which have been restored.

Instagram cracks down on coronavirus AR effects

  Instagram cracks down on coronavirus AR effects Instagram is taking new steps to combat the spread of coronavirus-related misinformation. The company has removed augmented reality effects that claim to "diagnose" or "treat" coronavirus, and will begin hiding other coronavirus-themed augmented reality effects from search results. "We've removed previously-published effects and are rejecting all new effects, which claim to predict, diagnose, treat, or cure coronavirus," Facebook wrote in an"We've removed previously-published effects and are rejecting all new effects, which claim to predict, diagnose, treat, or cure coronavirus," Facebook wrote in an update to its AR creators.

"This is a bug in an anti- spam system, unrelated to any change in our content moderator workforce," Guy Rosen, Facebook 's vice president for integrity One user said she received a message saying "link is not allowed" after attempting to post a Vox article about the coronavirus in her Instagram profile.

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook 's head of safety said on Tuesday a bug was responsible for posts on topics including coronavirus being erroneously marked as spam , prompting widespread complaints from users of both its flagship app and photo-sharing app Instagram. "This is a bug in an

As the pandemic continues, fighting misinformation will be an even bigger challenge than it normally is. Facebook has already offered free ads to reputable sources like the World Health Organization and banned ads promoting false "cures." Google has a multi-faceted approach, and Apple is rejecting coronavirus apps to limit misinformation. While these efforts are necessary, they could be undermined by bugs like the one Facebook just encountered.

Guy Rosen

Facebook aims its Messenger at coronavirus battle .
Facebook on Monday began enlisting outside developers to create ways its Messenger service can help health organizations battling the novel coronavirus. He unveiled a global program intended to connect government health organizations and UN agencies with developers who can create ways to use Messenger share accurate information and speed up responses to people's questions.The social network also invited software savants to take part in an online "hackathon" aimed at creating ways to use Messenger to ease social-distancing and deliver accurate information about the pandemic, according to Messenger vice president Stan Chudnovsky in a blog post.

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