•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Elon Musk says his companies will make ventilators as coronavirus causes shortage

14:45  19 march  2020
14:45  19 march  2020 Source:   cnet.com

Elon Musk expects SpaceX's first crewed mission between April and June

  Elon Musk expects SpaceX's first crewed mission between April and June Now that SpaceX has completed Crew Dragon's in-flight launch escape test, when can you expect a mission with humans aboard? At last, the company has a more specific answer than early 2020. Company chief Elon Musk told attendees at a post-test conference that the crewed mission to the International Space Station will likely take place in the second quarter of the year, or sometime between April and June. SpaceX was "highly confident" the hardwareIt's a good idea to take estimates like this with a grain of salt. Schedules for spaceflight can slip with little warning (even this latest test was delayed by a day).

Elon Musk says on Twitter that his factories will make ventilators if there is a shortage due to coronavirus . Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk said on Twitter that his factories will be repurposed to "I am a Tesla owner and love the company . You have to stop being an idiot about this.

Elon Musk found himself bombarded with internet rage, after promising to pump out ventilators to treat Covid-19 patients – but only if hospitals needed them. People found this to be a rather ignorant thing to say . The digital fracas began after Musk signaled that he could use Tesla and SpaceX’s production

Elon Musk offered to make ventilators as hospitals facing shortages due to the coronavirus outbreak, after a Twitter follower asked that he repurpose his factory to do so. However, the Tesla and SpaceX boss also noted that it'll take time.

Elon Musk looking at the camera: Elon Musk could help out with the ventilator shortage. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images © Provided by CNET Elon Musk could help out with the ventilator shortage. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Nate Silver, the editor of statistics and polling-focused news site FiveThirtyEight, pressed him for details.

"Tesla makes cars with sophisticated hvac systems. SpaceX makes spacecraft with life support systems," Musk replied."Ventilators are not difficult, but cannot be produced instantly."

SpaceX’s Starship rocket prototype collapsed on itself this weekend

  SpaceX’s Starship rocket prototype collapsed on itself this weekend Another SpaceX test ended in failure this past weekend. A prototype of the company's Starship rocket, SN1, imploded in a pressure test late Friday night. Elon Musk acknowledged the incident on Twitter, sharing a video and writing, "It's fine, we'll just buff it out." The prototype caved in on itself after being filled with super-cold, liquid nitrogen propellant, The Vergereports. In a tweet, Musk said it had to do with a "puck" at the base ofThe prototype caved in on itself after being filled with super-cold, liquid nitrogen propellant, The Vergereports. In a tweet, Musk said it had to do with a "puck" at the base of the vehicle. "Don't shuck the puck!" he joked.

Elon Musk , CEO of SpaceX and founder of Tesla, says he will convert a factory to create ventilators if needed. The machines are needed to help those who are seriously ill with coronavirus . He tweeted that 'if 'We will make ventilators if there is a shortage ,' Musk tweeted today in response to a fan's

Musk responded that "We will make ventilators if there is a shortage " and FiveThirtyEight editor in Finally, Musk said " Ventilators are not difficult, but cannot be produced instantly. At the moment, his most recent tweet maintained the stance that "panic" will cause more harm than the virus itself.

Silver praised Musk and noted that hospitals in New York City and Seattle "are in acute danger," then suggested medical facilities in need should tweet him and Musk.

The new strain of coronavirus, which can develop into a respiratory illness known as COVID-19, was discovered in Wuhan, China, in December. It's now infected more than 218,000 people and caused more than 8,800 deaths globally. The US has more than 9,400 confirmed cases.

Elon Musk looking at the camera: Elon Musk could help out with the ventilator shortage. © Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Elon Musk could help out with the ventilator shortage.

Hospitals have warned that they're not prepared for the expected influx of coronavirus patients, and the US Department of Defense is donating 5 million surgical masks and 2,000 ventilators.

Musk drew criticism earlier this month when he tweeted that the panic over the coronavirus was "dumb."

Tesla's one millionth car is a Model Y

  Tesla's one millionth car is a Model Y Tesla has reached one of its goals, which once sounded a bit too lofty and ambitious: manufacturing one million electric vehicles by 2020. Company chief Elon Musk has shared a couple of images on Twitter congratulating his team for making Tesla's 1 millionth car. One of the photos is a red Model Y, most likely the millionth EV to come off its production line, while the other is the same car surrounded by company personnel. Congratulations TeslaCongratulations Tesla team on making our 1,000,000th car!! pic.twitter.

"We will make ventilators if there is a shortage ," Musk said on Twitter, responding to a fan's suggestion that The Trump administration on Tuesday urged U.S. construction companies to donate respirator masks to hospitals and healthcare providers fighting the virus, amid a nationwide shortage .

CEO Elon Musk said Tesla could make ventilators , joining Softbank and other firms in offering medical supplies. "We will make ventilators if there is a shortage ," Musk said on Twitter Companies such as Apple supplier Foxconn have refitted production lines to make masks and similar

Tesla didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Trump orders General Motors to make ventilators under Defense Production Act .
President Donald Trump has ordered General Motors to make ventilators under the Defense Production Act hours after criticizing the company for not acting quickly enough to produce the supplies amid the coronavirus pandemic. © Provided by CNBC President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Briefing Room, Thursday, March 26, 2020, in Washington. The Korean War-era statute can force certain American companies to produce materials that are in short supply in the face of the growing outbreak.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!