•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Could giant concrete 'umbrellas' stop a hurricane's storm surge?

09:00  04 april  2020
09:00  04 april  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

White House threatens to veto House bill to aid Puerto Rico earthquake recovery

  White House threatens to veto House bill to aid Puerto Rico earthquake recovery The White House on Wednesday formally threatened to veto a House bill that would provide billions of dollars in additional funding for earthquake relief in Puerto Rico. © Getty a photo of power lines in Puerto Rico The House is set to vote later this week on legislation that would allocate $4.7 billion in funds after the island, still reeling from 2017's Hurricane Maria, was devastated by multiple earthquakes last month. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Could giant concrete ' umbrellas ' stop a hurricane ' s storm surge ? The proposed umbrellas would measure 26 feet tall when deployed against storm surge . They would be shells of reinforced concrete about four inches thick, built in the shape of a saddle that curves inward along one axis and

In a new approach to storm surge protection, a Princeton team has created a preliminary design for dual-purpose kinetic umbrellas , which would provide shade during fair The researchers used computational modeling to begin evaluating the umbrellas ’ ability to withstand an acute storm surge .

Could giant "dual-purpose" concrete umbrellas provide shade on sunny days and then transform into protective barriers on stormy days?

  Could giant concrete 'umbrellas' stop a hurricane's storm surge? © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A group of engineers from Princeton University thinks so, and have created a preliminary design for these structures, a new study said.

As seas rise and storms get worse due to climate change, coastal communities are building more seawalls to help protect people and property from extreme floods, Princeton University reports.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

"These barriers can be unattractive and restrict access to beaches, but the Princeton team’s umbrellas would provide shade during fair weather and could be tilted in advance of a storm to form a flood barrier," according to a statement.

Storm Dennis will be a menace for the UK

  Storm Dennis will be a menace for the UK One week after Storm Ciara lashed the United Kingdom with heavy rain and extreme wind gusts, another storm is knocking at the door. © Provided by CNNStorm Dennis is now taking shape in the Western Atlantic and will become more menacing over the next day. A separate but powerful low-pressure system is already in the Atlantic, which will bring damaging winds and blowing snow to Iceland Friday.Coastal areas of Iceland could see hurricane-force winds Friday, with gusts over 124 mph (200 kph) warned the Icelandic met office. These two systems will dance around each other Friday before Dennis moves east.

In a new approach to storm surge protection, a team has created a preliminary design for dual-purpose kinetic umbrellas that would provide shade during fair weather and could be tilted in advance of a storm to form a flood barrier. The researchers used computational modeling to begin evaluating the

Storm - surge watches are now in effect from Shell Beach, Louisiana, to the Mississippi/Alabama For now, it looks like landfall could occur any time from late Friday night into Saturday afternoon. Tropical Storm Barry formed Thursday morning in the northern Gulf of Mexico and may become a hurricane

“This is a completely new way of thinking about coastal defense structures,” said study co-author Maria Garlock, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Princeton. “Moving forward, our goal is to make these umbrellas part of a smart, sustainable community.” 

Storm surge has accounted for about half of the deaths in hurricanes since 1970, the National Hurricane Center said. In fact, storm surge caused most of the 1,200 deaths during Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Surge is also typically the most destructive part of a hurricane: In Superstorm Sandy in 2012, storm-surge-induced flooding measured as high as 9 feet above ground in parts of New York and New Jersey, which led to billions of dollars in damage.

Judge: Army Corps not responsible for Harvey flooding damage

  Judge: Army Corps not responsible for Harvey flooding damage HOUSTON (AP) — A federal judge has ruled the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers isn't liable to damage to thousands of Houston homes that were inundated by two federally owned reservoirs in the days following Hurricane Harvey because they would have flooded regardless. U.S. Judge Loren A. Smith of the Court of Federal Claims on Tuesday dismissed the case against the government. Smith said property owners downstream of the Addicks and Barker dams, located about 20 miles (30 kilometers) west of downtown Houston, had no grounds to sue given the unprecedented nature of Harvey's flooding in 2017.

Storm surge , or coastal flooding, tends to be the deadliest aspect of hurricanes . As wind from the storm Levees, canals and seawalls are designed to stop or redirect rising water away from cities. So when a major hurricane like Irma hits low-lying areas like these, the storm surge can be the first

Animation showing an example of hurricane storm surge damage as measured using hurricane intensity scale. To learn more about hurricane winds and tropical

The proposed umbrellas would measure 26 feet tall when deployed against storm surge. They would be shells of reinforced concrete about four inches thick, built in the shape of a saddle that curves inward along one axis and outward along the other. 

"This is so much more than just your typical coastal defensive structure," said study lead author Shengzhe Wang, a Ph.D. student in civil and environmental engineering at Princeton. "It’s the first time that anyone has really tried to integrate architecture as an inherent component to a coastal countermeasure."

According to the study, the umbrellas would remain stable when faced with a wall of water about 75% of their deployed height. 

"These shells are so thin that anyone looking at this would not be inclined to believe that these structures would be capable of stopping such large forces from water,” said Wang. “But we're able to take advantage of the geometry of the shape that gives the structure the additional strength that’s required.”

The team plans to investigate the potential of using sustainable materials to construct the umbrellas, as well as adding sensors and actuators to control them, and also incorporating systems for capturing solar energy and storm water.

The study was published last week in the Journal of Structural Engineering.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Could giant concrete 'umbrellas' stop a hurricane's storm surge?

Cyclone Amphan update: India and Bangladesh brace for record storm .
Millions of people in India and Bangladesh are in the path of a super cyclone which is due to make landfall in less than 36 hours, bringing damaging winds and heavy rain to a region already struggling with the coronavirus pandemic. © Provided by CNN Tropical Cyclone Amphan_00001621.jpg Super Cyclone Amphan became the strongest storm ever recorded in the Bay of Bengal on Monday night, after intensifying with sustained wind speeds of up to 270 kilometers per hour (165 miles per hours), according to data from the US Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 3
This is interesting!