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Technology Hackers sell over 73 million stolen user records on the dark web

01:25  11 may  2020
01:25  11 may  2020 Source:   engadget.com

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Hackers initially leaked 15 million user records online, for free, but later put the company's entire Encouraged and emboldened by the profits from the Tokopedia sale, the same group has, over the The listed databases total for 73 .2 million user records , which the hacker is selling for around The hacker group has shared samples from some of the stolen databases, which ZDNet has verified

Hackers sell stolen user data from HomeChef, ChatBooks, and Chronicle. A hacking group has started to flood a dark web hacking marketplace with databases containing a combined total of 73 .2 million user records over 11 different companies.

A string of data breaches is causing headaches for more than a few internet users. ZDNet has learned that the hacking group ShinyHunters is selling about 73.2 million user records the attackers say were stolen from numerous sites. About 30 million come from the dating app Zoosk, while 15 million are from the printing service Chatbooks. The rest come from a variety of sites, including the Star Tribune newspaper (1 million), South Korean fashion and furniture sites (8 million total) and the Chronicle of Higher Education (3 million).

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While the legitimacy of some databases couldn’t be verified, ZDNet found that samples from the breach matched real records. Researchers in the community also believed that ShinyHunters was authentic.

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The Dark Web is sometimes used by hackers to sell data stolen from websites and posted onto forums. Given the data contain sensitive details on the users , it might be used by cybercriminals for phishing and spamming.' Phishing scams use information like email addresses and Facebook ID's to

It is being reported that profile details of over 267 million Facebook accounts were up for grabs on the Dark Web for a paltry EUR 500 (roughly 2 or #Facebook Facebook Facebook Account Hacked Facebook 267 Million Account Sold On Dark Web Do Not Use Facebook Facebook Dark Web Deal.

This appears to be part of a larger campaign. The group also claimed to have stolen 500GB from Microsoft’s private GitHub repositories, and broke into the Indonesian online store Tokopedia earlier in May. The GitHub breach didn’t include any known sensitive material, but ShinyHunters put Tokopedia’s database on sale for $5,000. Like with many breaches, this appears to have been a cash grab — what’s surprising is the scale and speed of the effort.

hacker group steals more than $ 200 million in cryptocurrencies .
© DEFAULT_CREDIT motive photo hacker (image: Shutterstock) The group called CryptoCore supposedly hails from Eastern Europe. Has been active since the beginning of 2018. Security researchers attribute it to up to 20 attempted attacks and at least five successful break-ins. A hacker group called CryptoCore is said to have captured approximately $ 200 million in attacks on cryptocurrency exchanges over a period of around two years .

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This is interesting!