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Technology Mozilla, Reddit, Twitter call on Congress to protect your browsing privacy

03:14  23 may  2020
03:14  23 may  2020 Source:   cnet.com

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Privacy advocates are urging the House of Representatives to pass a law that would require the FBI to obtain a warrant to view your search history. A group of technology companies are calling on Congress to protect your browser history, which could be obtained without a search warrant by the

Tor Browser Bundle, a pre-configured web browser intended to protect your anonymity when used with safe browsing practices. Also, see this Reddit thread on hosted private email options. Hosting your own email server on a physical box or Use Signal to protect your messages and calls with

A group of technology companies is calling on Congress to protect your browser history, which could be obtained without a search warrant by the FBI unless lawmakers pass legislation preventing it.

a piece of paper: Privacy advocates are urging the House of Representatives to pass a law that would require the FBI to obtain a warrant to view your search history. Angela Lang/CNET © Provided by CNET Privacy advocates are urging the House of Representatives to pass a law that would require the FBI to obtain a warrant to view your search history. Angela Lang/CNET

On May 13, the US Senate rejected an amendment to the USA Freedom Reauthorization Act that would require the government to obtain a warrant before searching through Americans' browsing and search histories. The bipartisan amendment, proposed by Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat from Oregon, and Sen. Steve Daines, a Republican from Montana, failed to pass by one vote.

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Hi r/ privacy I have a problem with Twitter always asking for my phone number. I have a twitter Reddit has implemented a new Chat feature, that for now, doesn’t allow Subreddits to opt out. Tor Browser Bundle, a pre-configured web browser intended to protect your anonymity when used with

Mozilla does not collect data from your use of the Facebook Container extension. We only know the number of times the extension is installed or removed. If you use your Facebook credentials to create an account or log in using your Facebook credentials, it may not work properly and you may not be

Now privacy advocates and tech companies are calling on the House of Representatives to consider those protections. Mozilla, Reddit, Twitter and Patreon, along with organizations including Reform Government Surveillance, Engine and i2Coalition, signed a letter Friday requesting that House leaders include the Wyden and Daines amendment.

"Our users demand that we serve as responsible stewards of their private information, and our industry is predicated on that trust," the letter says. "Americans deserve to have their online searches and browsing kept private, and only available to the government pursuant to a warrant."

Under the USA Freedom Reauthorization Act, Congress has been looking at restoring government surveillance powers that expired in March with the Patriot Act. Lawmakers have been adding provisions onto the legislation, like an amendment that would require outside legal experts to provide insight on privacy and civil liberties issues to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

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To keep your personal data private , you should open questionable websites in Incognito mode. It's not secure enough to delete your browser data after you visit a site because a hacker might steal your data while you are on the site. Apart from that, deleting browser data may lead to you losing the

Go to “Settings” -> “ Privacy and Security” -> “Clear browsing data”. A window will open up with two viewing options: “Basic” and “Advanced.” The former allows you to clear out your cookies, browsing history and caches; the latter gives you the chance to delete all of those items along with other types

The bill was sent to the House of Representatives on May 14, without the Wyden-Daines amendment. If the bill becomes law, it gives the FBI the ability to view Americans' web browser history without a warrant.

The group of tech companies isn't the only one calling for the House to implement privacy protections. More than 50 civil liberties groups, including the American Civil Liberties Union, Fight for the Future and Human Rights Watch, as well as privacy advocates like DuckDuckGo and the Center for Democracy & Technology, signed a letter on May 18 to the House's leaders to adopt this protection.

a piece of paper: Privacy advocates are urging that the House of Representatives pass a law that would require the FBI to obtain a warrant to view your search history. © Angela Lang/CNET

Privacy advocates are urging that the House of Representatives pass a law that would require the FBI to obtain a warrant to view your search history.

The Newest Chrome Update Is About Power, Not Privacy .
When we talk about Google, regard for personal privacy is generally the last thing on any of our minds. So when Google announced on its company blog yesterday that the latest Chrome update—Chrome 83—would be jam-packed with new goodies meant to beef up the browser’s privacy and security chops, I was, in a word, skeptical as to how safe and secure they actually were. © Photo: Getty Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai In some ways, I was pleasantly surprised—particularly when it came to the updates to the browser’s security chops.

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