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Technology Facebook's Zuckerberg defends decision to leave up 'inflamatory' Trump posts about Minnesota protests

04:15  30 may  2020
04:15  30 may  2020 Source:   cnet.com

Twitter said Trump broke its rules. Facebook allows the same posts.

  Twitter said Trump broke its rules. Facebook allows the same posts. If Twitter’s decision to hide Donald Trump’s tweet has amped up the pressure on Facebook to do the same, it hasn’t resulted in any noticeable action from the social network. Twitter said in a statement Trump’s words received the label “in the interest of preventing others from being inspired to commit violent acts.” The same tweet was again labeled when it was subsequently posted by the official White House Twitter account. But the words didn’tTwitter said in a statement Trump’s words received the label “in the interest of preventing others from being inspired to commit violent acts.” The same tweet was again labeled when it was subsequently posted by the official White House Twitter account.

Facebook Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg said the social network didn’t put warnings on U. S . President Donald Trump ’ s posts about demonstrations in Minnesota because they talked about potential government military action, which Facebook users need to know about.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said the company will not fact-check political speech (including political ads). Perhaps angling to escape Trump ’ s Experts say Trump ’ s order is unconstitutional, representing a legal overreach by the executive branch. Below are Trump ’ s posts on Facebook and

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg spoke out Friday evening after pressure from inside and outside of his company to respond to posts by President Donald Trump seeming to threaten to shoot what he called "thugs" protesting the death of George Floyd while in police custody.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump has been harshly criticized for his social media posts about Minnesota. Getty Images © Provided by CNET President Donald Trump has been harshly criticized for his social media posts about Minnesota. Getty Images

Shortly after after protesters outraged by the death of Floyd, a black man in Minnesota, torched a police building there Thursday, Trump vowed "when the looting starts, the shooting starts" in social media posts. The phrase, once used by segregationist Georgia Governor George Wallace, is seen as an approval of police violence against protesters. Within hours, Twitter hid the post behind a warning that it violated the site's rules against "glorifying violence," the first of such moves the company took against Trump's tweets.

Facebook employees publicly criticize Zuckerberg's inaction on Trump posts

  Facebook employees publicly criticize Zuckerberg's inaction on Trump posts In a rare example of public dissent, some Facebook employees are publicly taking to Twitter to express strong voicing their disapproval of disagreements with CEO Mark Zuckerberg's their company's decision to not take any action on a series of controversial posts last week from President Donald Trump.Some Facebook employees plan to stage a virtual walkout on Monday to protest CEO Mark Zuckerberg's decision not to take action on a series of controversial posts from President Donald Trump last week, a person familiar with the plans told CNN Business.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg defends himself against Twitter's Jack Dorsey, saying political ad decision is not all about money. Facebook ' s approach came under intense scrutiny this month after the company said it would allow Trump 's re-election campaign to run an ad with false claims about

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg weighed in as President Trump lashes out at Twitter for fact-checking two of his tweets and prepares an executive order targeting social media companies. UP NEXT.

But the posts remained on Facebook and Instagram, where it racked up more than 64,000 shares and more than 426,000 "likes." Zuckerberg took to his Facebook page late Friday defending the move, saying he'd discussed the matter with his team and chose to let them stand.

"I know many people are upset that we've left the President's posts up, but our position is that we should enable as much expression as possible unless it will cause imminent risk of specific harms or dangers spelled out in clear policies," he wrote. "Although the post had a troubling historical reference, we decided to leave it up because the National Guard references meant we read it as a warning about state action, and we think people need to know if the government is planning to deploy force."

Zuckerberg defends Facebook's hands-off response to Trump's controversial posts, report says

  Zuckerberg defends Facebook's hands-off response to Trump's controversial posts, report says Unlike Twitter, Facebook didn't take any action against posts that employees say could incite violence. © Provided by CNET Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's approach to political speech is drawing criticism from his own employees. James Martin/CNET The New York Times, which listened to audio of an internal meeting, reported Tuesday that Zuckerberg told employees he had made a "tough decision" but that it "was pretty thorough.

Where Twitter has taken action with recent Trump tweets, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said it’ s wrong for companies to become the “arbiter of As it stands, Trump ’ s “looting” message is also up on his Facebook account with no label or warning. Trump has long maintained that social media

On today' s show, Mark Zuckerberg tells CNBC why Facebook is not an "arbiter of truth," and why political speech should be protected. Plus, CNBC' s Robert Frank reveals what he learned from surveying the money habits of America' s millionaires.

He added that the company is going to rethink its approach to this policy following Trump's posts. "We have been in touch with the White House today to explain these policies as well."

Zuckerberg's comes at a time when big tech companies are under increasing pressure to help tamp down on disinformation and misinformation, as well as harassing and threatening behavior. Twitter, which has born the brunt of criticism for seemingly allowing Trump to regularly violate its terms of service disallowing such behavior, pushed back against the president Tuesday by slapping a fact check at the bottom of a tweet about mail-in voting. The company moved again Friday morning, hiding the tweet about looting and shooting behind a warning that it glorified violence.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump has been harshly criticized for his social media posts about Minnesota. © Getty Images

President Donald Trump has been harshly criticized for his social media posts about Minnesota.

Dealing with presidential statements: First Facebook employees quit because of dispute over Trump contribution

 Dealing with presidential statements: First Facebook employees quit because of dispute over Trump contribution © ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP CEO Mark Zuckerberg justified Facebook's handling of a contribution by US President Donald Trump to his employees. They are protesting against their own company, which did not contest President Trump's threat. CEO Zuckerberg defends the decision. First Facebook employees quit due to dispute over Trump contribution Several Facebook employees have quit to protest the attitude of CEO Mark Zuckerberg in the dispute over posts by US President Donald Trump.

SIGN UP . Former vice president Joe Biden said he is "furious" over President Donald Trump "calling for violence against American citizens" during the protests National Guard members walk at the area in the aftermath of a protest after a white police officer was caught on a bystander' s video pressing

Trump signed an executive order that purported to address "censorship" by Twitter and other social media companies, following Twitter' s earlier decision to affix fact-check type labels to two of his misleading posts about mail-in voting ballots. Later on Friday morning, Trump resumed his criticisms

The moves enraged Trump, who signed an executive order Thursday requesting government agencies to begin investigating ways to regulate or otherwise punish social media companies for their perceived biases and behavior. "This will be a Big Day for Social Media and FAIRNESS!" he tweeted before signing the order.

Meanwhile, Facebook and its Instagram photo sharing app have left Trump's posts alone, upsetting social media critics and staff inside the company alike.

Scientists funded by Chan Zuckerberg Initiative urge Facebook CEO to curb misinformation .
The group pointed to President Trump’s “looting” post as antithetical to CZI’s missionThe scientists said in the letter that allowing President Trump to use Facebook “to spread both misinformation and incendiary statements” was not only a violation of Facebook’s policies but “directly antithetical” to CZI’s goal of building a “more inclusive, just and healthy future for everyone.

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