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Technology Tesla wants to use radar sensors to detect kids left in hot cars

01:14  22 august  2020
01:14  22 august  2020 Source:   engadget.com

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Future Tesla cars may come with a built-in feature that can make sure no kids are inadvertently left behind in hot cars . According to the company’s filing (via The Verge), the device uses millimeter-wave radar technology to detect movements within a vehicle and to classify its occupants.

The California automaker wants permission to use unlicensed millimeter-wave sensors that would operate at higher power levels than allowed under existing rules. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says more than 50 children died when left behind in hot cars in both 2019 and 2018.

Future Tesla cars may come with a built-in feature that can make sure no kids are inadvertently left behind in hot cars. The automaker has asked the FCC for permission to market a short-range interactive motion sensing device that uses a higher power level than current rules allow. According to the company’s filing (via The Verge), the device uses millimeter-wave radar technology to detect movements within a vehicle and to classify its occupants.

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The California automaker wants permission to use unlicensed millimeter-wave sensors that would operate at higher power levels than allowed under The request is pending. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says more than 50 children died when left behind in hot cars in both

52 children died as a result of being left in hot cars in 2019, while 18 have died so far this year, according to data from the National Highway Traffic Automotive supplier Valeo SA’s (OTC: VLEEF) North America unit approached the FCC for its monitoring device that also detects children left in cars .

a sign on the side of a building: Indianapolis - Circa April 2017: Tesla Service Center. Tesla designs and manufactures the Model S electric sedan IV Indianapolis - Circa April 2017: Tesla Service Center. Tesla designs and manufactures the Model S electric sedan IV

The company noted that over 50 children died inside hot cars in 2019, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Tesla said this technology can be more effective than camera systems at preventing similar deaths, because it can “see” through soft materials such as blankets and child restraints. And because it can detect breathing patterns and heart rates unlike weight-based sensor systems, it can tell the difference between an actual child and an object, thereby preventing false alarms.

The technology has other potential uses, as well. It could enable optimized airbag deployment in a crash, thanks to its capability to assess body size. It could also lead to more accurate seatbelt reminders, since it can tell if there’s an actual person (and not an object) in the seat. Finally, while the technology will focus on the vehicle’s interior, it can also scan up to six feet outside of a car. That would give it the capability needed to provide a more advanced theft prevention system that can detect broken windows and vehicle intrusion.

Based on the public notice the FCC has released (PDF), Tesla filed the waiver back on July 31st. The agency is now seeking comments about the automaker’s request until September 21st, 2020.

The T in the Tesla logo does not stand for the brand name - that's actually behind it .
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