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Technology TikTok files last-minute lawsuit against Trump administration to stave off looming ban

01:30  20 september  2020
01:30  20 september  2020 Source:   theverge.com

TikTok CEO says platform code will be made public in pushback against 'rumors and misinformation'

  TikTok CEO says platform code will be made public in pushback against 'rumors and misinformation' Newly appointed TikTok CEO Kevin Mayer announced Wednesday that TikTok's code will be made available for experts to study, as the company pushed back strongly against "rumors and misinformation" around its data security practices and ties to the Chinese government. "We believe our entire industry should be held to an exceptionally high standard," Mayer, a former Disney executive who took over as CEO in May, wrote in a blog post. "That's why we"We believe our entire industry should be held to an exceptionally high standard," Mayer, a former Disney executive who took over as CEO in May, wrote in a blog post.

TikTok and parent company ByteDance filed a lawsuit late Friday against the Trump administration to try to fend off a ban on new downloads of the app set to take effect Sunday, The Wall Street Journal reported.

a close up of a sign © Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

TikTok says in the lawsuit that the Trump administration’s decision to ban new downloads of the app, announced Friday, violates free speech protections. The administration, which includes the Commerce Department, “took this extraordinary action of prohibiting a popular communication and information-sharing platform without affording its owners … due process of law, and for political reasons rather than because of any ‘unusual and extraordinary threat’ to the United States,” according to the suit.

TikTok is reportedly planning to sue the Trump administration over its ban as early as Tuesday

  TikTok is reportedly planning to sue the Trump administration over its ban as early as Tuesday NPR reported that a source says TikTok plans to sue the Trump administration, arguing that the order "failed to give the company a chance to respond."President Donald Trump's executive order on Thursday banned US individuals and companies from engaging in business transactions with TikTok parent company Chinese firm ByteDance.

It’s not the first time TikTok has argued that the Trump administration acted against it without due process. The administration called for a TikTok ban earlier this year over what it said were data security concerns, and demanded that ByteDance sell TikTok US operations to an American company by September 15th. TikTok filed a suit against President Trump in August, arguing that Trump’s original order did not provide any evidence that TikTok was a national security threat to the US.

Beijing-based ByteDance has been in talks with several US companies in recent weeks, working on a plan to create a new entity, TikTok Global, to address the Trump administration’s concerns about security. Oracle and Walmart are the remaining candidates with a shot at a stake in the new TikTok company.

TikTok sues Trump administration over ban in US

  TikTok sues Trump administration over ban in US In a lawsuit reportedly filed in federal court, the popular video app says Trump's order didn't provide evidence TikTok is an actual threat.The lawsuit was filed Monday in the US District Court for the Central District of California, according to the New York Times. In a blogpost, TikTok said Trump's order didn't follow due process or provide "evidence that TikTok was an actual threat." The executive order also failed to justify its "punitive actions," the company said.

“We’ve already committed to unprecedented levels of additional transparency and accountability well beyond what other apps are willing to do, including third-party audits, verification of code security, and US government oversight of US data security,” TikTok said in a statement Friday.

The US is TikTok’s second-largest market outside of China following a ban in India, according to analytics platform Sensor Tower, averaging about 7.6 million installs per month from the App Store and Google Play in 2020. TikTok added 247,000 new installs Friday, marking a 12 percent increase from Thursday, Sensor Tower’s data showed.

TikTok's US ban is on hold. What comes next? .
TikTok averted a ban in the United States last week when a federal judge ruled that Washington couldn't block it from app stores just yet. © Chine Nouvelle/Sipa/Shutterstock The logo of TikTok is seen on a smartphone screen in New York, the United States, Aug. 30, 2020. The short-form video app is still accessible, but its fate in the country is far from certain. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

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