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Technology COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories Are Spreading Rapidly—and They're a Public Health Risk All Their Own

05:01  22 september  2020
05:01  22 september  2020 Source:   time.com

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COVID - 19 Conspiracy Theories Are Spreading Rapidly — and They ' re a Public Health Risk All Their Own . Public health crises have spawned conspiracy theories as far back as when the Black Death ravaged Europe in the 1300s, as people desperately try to make sense of the chaotic forces

QAnon refers to the online community that believes in conspiracy theories about Donald Trump and the so-called deep state, and is spreading harmful misinformation about COVID - 19 . False information from the QAnon community about the coronavirus pandemic is a public health hazard.

Public health crises have spawned conspiracy theories as far back as when the Black Death ravaged Europe in the 1300s, as people desperately try to make sense of the chaotic forces disrupting their lives. While modern science offers a better understanding of how diseases infect people and how to contain them, COVID-19 conspiracy theories are spreading rapidly via social media, unreliable news outlets and from our own political leaders, including U.S. President Donald Trump. The result: many Americans now believe pandemic-related conspiracy theories—and, alarmingly, those same people are less likely to take steps to prevent the virus from spreading.

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  Vikings place first-round pick Justin Jefferson, three other rookies on Reserve/COVID-19 list It is not certain if Jefferson and the three other rookies have contracted the virus. Players must be placed on the COVID-19/reserve list if they test positive or have come in contact with an infected person. The Vikings announced earlier Monday their infection control officer tested positive for the coronavirus.The Vikings used one of their two first-round picks on Jefferson, who will be expected to fill the role Stefon Diggs occupied for years opposite Adam Thielen. He is coming off a dominant senior season at LSU, when he caught 111 passes for 1,540 yards and 18 touchdowns.

Conspiracy theories and misinformation about coronavirus damage society in a number of ways. The new virus was identified, along with its natural origins, and tests for it were rapidly developed. The recent downgrading of COVID - 19 death projections, which reveal the success of social-distancing

Misinformation and conspiracy theories about COVID - 19 continue to flourish in the wake of the pandemic. A recent online survey of about 2 All data and statistics are based on publicly available data at the time of publication. Some information may be out of date. Visit our coronavirus hub and

a person is walking down the street: A person wears a protective face mask next to a graffiti that reads, © Getty Images—2020 Noam Galai A person wears a protective face mask next to a graffiti that reads, "COVID is a hoax" in TriBeCa as the city continues Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on Sept. 11 in New York City.

In a University of Pennsylvania Annenberg Public Policy Center study published Monday in Social Science & Medicine, researchers surveyed a group of 840 U.S. adults—first in late March, and then again in mid-July—to determine how Americans’ beliefs and actions regarding the pandemic changed over time. Overall, they found that COVID-19 conspiracy theories are not only commonplace, they’re gaining traction. Back in March, 28% of people believed a debunked rumor that the Chinese government created the coronavirus as a bioweapon; that number rose to 37% by July. About 24% believed that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exaggerated the virus’ danger to hurt Trump politically despite a lack of evidence; by July, that figure rose to 32%. And in March, about 15% of respondents said they believed that the pharmaceutical industry created the virus to boost drug and vaccine sales—another unfounded theory—compared to 17% in July.

Vikings place first-round pick Justin Jefferson, three other rookies on Reserve/COVID-19 list

  Vikings place first-round pick Justin Jefferson, three other rookies on Reserve/COVID-19 list Baseball fans in Philadelphia say sports teams should wait longer to hit the field, this after two major league games scheduled for Monday were postponed after more than a dozen Miami Marlins players and staff tested positive for the coronavirus. (July 27)

Conspiracy theories will always circle major world events and disasters like paranoid vultures, but with the Covid - 19 pandemic they have been given a At best, the latest crop of Covid - 19 conspiracy theories are wacky bits of hogwash: Did The Simpsons predict coronavirus, or was it a thriller novel

Conspiracy theories : What they are and how they flourish. The theories can spread rapidly , particularly over social media, where people are easily taken in by them . Read the full COVID - 19 Risks Outlook: A Preliminary Mapping and its Implications report here, and our impact story with

Whether or not someone thinks NASA hired Stanley Kubrick to fake the moon landing has little bearing on the world beyond that person. But in the case of a pandemic—which requires people to follow public health guidance in order to keep one another safe—conspiratorial thinking can have disturbing consequences. Indeed, the Annenberg study found that only 62% of people who were most likely to believe the coronavirus conspiracies said they wear a mask every day when they’re around other people away from home, compared to 95% of non-believers. Furthermore, people who believe COVID-19 conspiracy theories were 2.2 times less likely to say they wanted to receive a vaccine in March; by July, they were 3.5 times less likely to want to be vaccinated.

“Belief in pandemic conspiracy theories appears to be an obstacle to minimizing the spread of COVID-19,” said Dan Romer, Annenberg Public Policy Center research director and a study co-author, in a statement.

One Phillies coach, one clubhouse staffer test positive for COVID-19

  One Phillies coach, one clubhouse staffer test positive for COVID-19 The plan had been for the Phillies to resume play on Saturday. Whether that is now in jeopardy isn’t known. The organization has already dealt with some infections earlier this year, but managed to avoid further spread within the club.This is worrisome news on several levels. First and foremost, it’s concerning to see two more individuals in the game carrying this disease. Hopefully they’ll both make a swift and full recovery.Beyond that, it’s obviously concerning to see that spread (presumably) occurred between the teams.

Internet & social media Medical Myths Public Health . COVID - 19 conspiracy theories : Vaccines and 5G Given a huge pandemic with tragic death tolls, it’s not surprising that conspiracy theories are popping up. Although I alluded to conspiracy theories about COVID - 19 in previous posts, I had

The coronavirus responsible for COVID - 19 has deadly adaptations that make it perfect for infecting humans. But this is a testament to natural selection, not As governments fight the COVID - 19 pandemic, Snopes is fighting an “infodemic” of rumors and misinformation, and you can help.

Where are people picking up COVID-19 conspiracy theories? Believers were more likely to be heavy users of social media and viewers of conservative media like Fox News, the study found. Meanwhile, people who watch other television news channels were more likely to follow public health guidance and to desire vaccination.

While the researchers say they understand how pandemic conspiracy theories are spreading, they say it’s still a challenge to get believers to reconsider once they’re sucked in. Other research suggests that simply correcting false information doesn’t usually work—and can even cause some people to believe conspiracies even more deeply.

“Conspiracy theories are difficult to displace because they provide explanations for events that are not fully understood, such as the current pandemic, play on people’s distrust of government and other powerful actors, and involve accusations that cannot be easily fact-checked,” said Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Annenberg Public Policy Center director and study co-author, in a statement.

Nuggets’ Michael Porter Jr. has theory on coronavirus ‘agenda’ .
Porter also claimed he has never received a vaccine in his life. Murray noted that the University of Missouri, where Porter played college ball, requires all students to be up to date on certain immunizations. However, there are medical and religious waivers. Porter Jr. ended his response to the question with the following: "It is a serious thing. It's a real thing but this is being overblown." — Clevis Murray (@ClevisMurray) July 29, 2020 It’s possible Porter Jr. hasn’t been vaccinated. According to the University of Missouri website, students can apply for a medical or religious waiver.

usr: 1
This is interesting!