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Technology Warming oceans more 'stable' and that's bad, scientists warn

22:35  28 september  2020
22:35  28 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

Experts call for climate change debate to move beyond science, focus on action

  Experts call for climate change debate to move beyond science, focus on action Climate change will be one of the topics discusses in the last presidential debate of 2020, but climate scientists say they already agree on what and why it's happening. The first presidential debate marked the first time climate change has been asked on that stage in 12 years. But the question itself was similar and asked the candidate, in this case Trump, if he believes in concluded science that has found the climate is changing in problematic ways and those changes are caused by human activity.

Global warming is making the oceans more stable, increasing surface temperatures and reducing the carbon they can absorb, according to research published Monday by climate scientists who warned that the findings have "profound and troubling" implications. 

a pool next to a body of water: Ocean © Fred Payet Ocean "stratification" means less deep water is rising towards the surface carrying oxygen and nutrients, while the water at the surface absorbs less atmospheric carbon dioxide to bury at depth

Man-made climate change has increased surface temperatures across the planet, leading to atmospheric instability and amplifying extreme weather events, such as storms. 

The Oceans Are Turning Into a Layer Cake

  The Oceans Are Turning Into a Layer Cake The oceans are facing a host of maladies, from acidification to sea level rise. Turning them into a ginormous liquid layer cake may sound comparatively benign (and delicious). But while Earther is decidedly pro-cake, this is in fact a bad situation. © Photo: Patrick Smith (Getty Images) A wave cresting near shore. New research published in Nature Climate Change on Monday shows that oceans are stratifying faster than previous research indicated. It’s due largely to rising temperatures, and the layer cake-ification of the oceans imperils carbon storage and could upend ecology around the world.

But in the oceans, higher temperatures have a different effect, slowing the mixing between the warming surface and the cooler, oxygen-rich waters below, researchers said. 

This ocean "stratification" means less deep water is rising towards the surface carrying oxygen and nutrients, while the water at the surface absorbs less atmospheric carbon dioxide to bury at depth.  

In a report published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the international team of climate scientists said they found that stratification globally had increased by a "substantial" 5.3 percent from 1960 to 2018. 

Most of this stabilisation occurred towards the surface, and was attributed largely to temperature rises. 

There's 14 million metric tons of microplastics sitting on the seafloor, study finds

  There's 14 million metric tons of microplastics sitting on the seafloor, study finds A new study from Australia's national science agency CSIRO sheds light on our plastic problem, estimating that there is 14 million tonnes of microplastics sitting on the ocean floor. That's more than 35 times as much plastic than is believed to be floating on the surface, the study suggests. Researchers say the work is the first global estimate of microplastics -- pieces of plastic that have been worn down by the elements into tiny fragments, smaller than 5 millimeters (0.19 inches) -- on the seafloor.

They said this process is also exacerbated by the melting of sea ice, meaning that more fresh water -- which is lighter than salt water -- also accumulates on the surface of the ocean. 

Study co-author Michael Mann, a climate science professor at Pennsylvania State University, said in a commentary published in Newsweek that the "seemingly technical finding has profound and troubling implications." 

These include potentially driving more "intense, destructive hurricanes" as ocean surfaces warm. 

Mann also pointed to a reduction in the amount of CO2 absorbed, which could mean that carbon pollution builds up faster than expected in the atmosphere.

He warned that sophisticated climate models often underestimate ocean stratification and may also be underestimating its impact.   

With warmer upper waters receiving less oxygen, there are also implications for marine life. 

By absorbing a quarter of man-made CO2 and soaking up more than 90 percent of the heat generated by greenhouse gases, oceans keep the population alive -- but at a terrible cost, according to the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC).

Seas have grown acidic, potentially undermining their capacity to draw down CO2. Warmer surface water has expanded the force and range of deadly tropical storms. Marine heatwaves are wiping out coral reefs, and accelerating the melt-off of glaciers and ice sheets driving sea level rise.

Last year, research published in the US Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences calculated that climate change would empty the ocean of nearly a fifth of all living creatures, measured by mass, by the end of the century.

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Kim Kardashian Cries While Detailing Robbery, More Letterman Revelations .
Baring it all. Kim Kardashian broke down in tears while recalling her 2016 Paris robbery on My Next Guest Needs No Introduction With David Letterman — and revealed a few more startling revelations. The Keeping Up With the Kardashians star, 39, sat down with host David Letterman on the Netflix series, which is set to debut on Wednesday, October 21. The KKW Beauty founder explained she “packed all my jewelry” for Paris fashion week in October 2016, which she had “never done before.” One week earlier, Kardashian said her husband, Kanye West, had given her a new ring that she showed off on social media. The E! personality recounted having lunch with her friends hours before the robbery, where they all discussed what they would do in that situation. “We had lunch that day and said, ‘If you guys were robbed, what would you do? Would you just give them the stuff?'” Kardashian said. “Why we had this conversation, it was so wild. I said, ‘I would say take everything, just take everything, nothing is important.'” Later that evening, West, 43 — who had briefly joined Kardashian in Paris — left to resume his tour. Meanwhile, Kourtney Kardashian and a friend went out to a club. Kim explained that she told the Poosh founder, 41, to bring their one security guard since she would be staying in the hotel room. At around 3 a.m., the reality star heard “stomping up the stairs” and thought it was her sister and friend coming home from the club.

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This is interesting!