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Technology Greenland Ice Sheet will melt at fastest rate in 12,000 years

04:35  01 october  2020
04:35  01 october  2020 Source:   cbsnews.com

Greenland could lose more ice this century than it has in 12,000 years

  Greenland could lose more ice this century than it has in 12,000 years The rate of ice melt over the last two decades was comparable to the highest points in recent geologic history—and it’s still speeding up.The speed with which the Greenland ice sheet is melting is too quick to be part of a natural cycle, scientists say. If the entire sheet went away, it would add 24 feet to global sea levels.

The Greenland Ice Sheet is on track to lose mass at about four times the fastest rate observed over the past 12 , 000 years . At its current trajectory, such melting would dump huge quantities of freshwater into the sea, raising global sea levels and disrupting ocean currents, scientists concluded in new

of ice sheet changes spanning nearly 12 , 000 years , from the dawn of the Holocene Epoch 11,700 10, 000 to 7, 000 years ago, Greenland lost ice at a rate of about 6, 000 billion metric tons each loss, but “no matter what humanity does, the ice will melt this century at a faster clip than it did during that

The Greenland Ice Sheet is on track to melt four times faster than it has at any point over the last 12,000 years, according to a recently published study. New research highlights just how extreme projected losses for this century could be — and refutes the idea that the current melting is part of a natural cycle.

a view of a mountain: 1601477688644.jpg © Jason Briner 1601477688644.jpg

In a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, researchers said they used ice sheet modeling in conjunction with satellite data and fieldwork to understand the past, present and future of Greenland's Ice Sheet. They called the current projections for the ice sheet, which lost a record amount of ice last year, "extreme and unusual."

Greenland's glaciers could lose more ice than predicted, study says

  Greenland's glaciers could lose more ice than predicted, study says A new study explores how Greenland's glaciers could lose more ice than previously predicted. © Universal Images Group via Getty Images, FILE Terminus of the Russell Glacier close to the Greenland Ice Sheet near Kangerlussuaq. The three largest glaciers, Jakobshavn Isbræ, Kangerlussuaq and Helheim, are responsible for about 12% of the entire ice sheet and hold enough ice to raise sea levels by around 1.3 meters, or about 4.3 feet, according to the study published Tuesday in Nature.

Greenland on track to lose ice faster in the 21st century than during any other century in the last 12 , 000 years , study warns. 'Basically, we've altered our planet so much that the rates of ice sheet melt this century are on pace to be greater than anything we've seen under natural variability of the

The Greenland Ice Sheet , seen here in Oct. 2018, is melting at a rapidly accelerating rate because This means that Greenland 's ice is melting on average seven times faster today than it was at the "On current trends, Greenland ice melting will cause 100 million people to be flooded each year by

"Basically, we've altered our planet so much that the rates of ice sheet melt this century are on pace to be greater than anything we've seen under natural variability of the ice sheet over the past 12,000 years," lead author Dr. Jason Briner from the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences said in a news release. "We'll blow that out of the water if we don't make severe reductions to greenhouse gas emissions."

diagram: The Greenland Ice Sheet is on track to shed ice faster this century than in any century over the past 12,000 years, according to the study. / Credit: Bob Wilder / University at Buffalo © Provided by CBS News The Greenland Ice Sheet is on track to shed ice faster this century than in any century over the past 12,000 years, according to the study. / Credit: Bob Wilder / University at Buffalo

According to the study, ice mass loss rates during the end of the last ice age are comparable to the loss that occurred between 2000 and 2018: about 6.1 billion metric tons per century. Future mass loss could be catastrophic — between 8.8 billion metric tons and 35.9 billion metric tons, depending on the level of greenhouse gas emissions.

Greenland Faces a Century of Unprecedented Ice Loss

  Greenland Faces a Century of Unprecedented Ice Loss Hey, we haven’t checked in on the Greenland in awhile, let’s see what’s hap Oh. Oh no.New research published on Wednesday in Nature shows the Greenland ice sheet is already pushing the boundaries of mass loss seen over the past 12,000 years. Even under the best-case climate scenario, where humanity rapidly draws down emissions starting ASAP, the ice sheet is set to hit unprecedented levels of loss over the course of the century.

The Greenland ice sheet (Danish: Grønlands indlandsis, Greenlandic: Sermersuaq) is a vast body of ice covering 1,710, 000 square kilometres (660, 000 sq mi), roughly 79% of the surface of Greenland .

Greenland ’s ice sheet is melting at its fastest rate in hundreds of years and that’s really bad news for all of us. If Greenland 's 650, 000 -square-mile ice sheet , which is three times the size of Texas, should ever melt entirely, sea levels could rise some 23 feet, according to an Intergovernmental Panel

Briner said that, in a best-case-scenario with massively reduced emissions, the ice loss will only be slightly higher than any of the past 12 millennia. But at the current rate of emissions, it's likely to be about four times higher — a projection the researchers called "sobering."

a view of a snow covered mountain: The edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet.  / Credit: Jason Briner © Provided by CBS News The edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet.  / Credit: Jason Briner

Researchers said the current rate of melting from the Ice Sheet is on par with that experienced at the collapse of the most recent ice age — when a very fast melt rate would be expected. But now, the planet is on track to surpass the global average surface temperature of that time by the end of the century.

The scientists who conducted the study are confident the current melt rate is not natural. They warn that the only solution to the current situation is to dramatically decrease greenhouse gas emissions in the near-future.

"It is no secret that the Greenland Ice Sheet is in rough shape and is losing ice at an increasing rate," said co-author Dr. Nicolás Young, from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. "But if someone wants to poke holes in this, they could simply ask, 'how do you know this isn't just part of the ice sheet's natural variability?' Well, what our study suggests is that the rate of ice loss for this century will exceed the rate of ice loss for any single century over the last 12,000 years. I think this is the first time that the current health of the Greenland Ice Sheet has been robustly placed into a long-term context."

There’s no hope for Greenland's melting ice sheet

  There’s no hope for Greenland's melting ice sheet Greenland’s ice sheet is in trouble. Two men were arrested in one of NYC’s most notorious unsolved killings. It's Monday's news.It's Ashley with the news to know.

Acknowledgements: Greenland Ice Sheet Today is produced at the National Snow and Ice Data Center by Ted Scambos, Julienne Stroeve, and Lora Koenig with support from NASA. NSIDC thanks Jason Box, Xavier Fettweis, and Thomas Mote for data and collaboration.

Greenland 's ice is melting at the rate scientists thought would be our worst-case scenario in 2070. On August 1, Greenland 's ice sheet lost 12 .5 billions tons of ice , more than any day since This year , the ice started to melt even earlier than in 2012 and three weeks earlier than average, CNN reported.

Greenland is currently the largest contributor to sea level rise — holding enough frozen water to raise sea levels by at least 20 feet — with Antarctica not far behind. As sea levels increase, coastal storms become more intense and devastating, meaning coastal cities and towns will either need to build stronger flood defenses or retreat inland altogether.

The Arctic is warming at about three times the rate of the rest of the planet, making it the fastest-warming region on Earth. Following the Northern Hemisphere's hottest summer on record, a 42 mile stretch of Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden, the Arctic's largest remaining ice shelf, broke off and shattered near Greenland earlier this month.

The researchers reiterated their ongoing call to world leaders to reduce emissions in order to slow ice sheet melting and reduce sea level rise.

"Our findings are yet another wake-up call, especially for countries like the U.S.," Briner said. "Americans use more energy per person than any other nation in the world. Our nation has produced more of the CO2 that resides in the atmosphere today than any other country."

"Americans need to go on an energy diet," he added. "The most affluent Americans, who have the highest energy footprint, can afford to make lifestyle changes, fly less, install solar panels and drive an energy-efficient vehicle."

Canadian ice shelf larger than Manhattan collapses into the sea .
The Milne Ice Shelf in Canada lost nearly half of its area in just two days. The collapse occurred on July 30 and 31, reducing the last fully intact ice shelf in Canada by 43%.This large sheet of ice then drifted into the Arctic Sea, further breaking into two large chunks. This entire calving event -- the scientific term for the breaking of ice chunks off glaciers -- was captured by the Copernicus Sentinel satellite.

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