•   
  •   
  •   

Technology Google is threatening to pull its search engine out of Australia

21:26  22 january  2021
21:26  22 january  2021 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Use Google? 5 new ways to secure your account

  Use Google? 5 new ways to secure your account Google accounts handle everything from your contacts, calendar, documents, files, photos and more. Kim Komando offers 5 tips to keep them secure.There's a site that maintains a regularly updated database of stolen email addresses and passwords. Enter your email address, and odds are, you'll see your password along with it. Tap or click here to find out if your email address and password are for sale on the Dark Web.

Google has threatened to remove its search engine from Australia over the nation's attempt to make the tech giant share royalties with news publishers. Are you going to pull out of every market, are you? Is this about stopping the precedence?" asked Senator Rex Patrick. Ms Silva replied that the

(Bloomberg) -- Google threatened to disable its search engine in Australia if it's forced to pay local publishers for news, a dramatic escalation of a Google threatens to pull out of Australia . Google says it will have no choice but to make its search engine unavailable in Australia if the government

Google on Friday warned Australian lawmakers it would stop offering its search engine in the country if they went ahead with a proposed law that would force the Internet giant to pay news organizations for showing their stories in search results.

a group of people looking at a laptop: Mel Silva, right, the managing director of Google Australia and New Zealand, appears via a video link during an Australian Senate inquiry into a mandatory code of conduct proposed by the government. © Mick Tsikas/AP Mel Silva, right, the managing director of Google Australia and New Zealand, appears via a video link during an Australian Senate inquiry into a mandatory code of conduct proposed by the government.

The threat is the latest and most intense in a long-running battle that has pit Australian lawmakers and news organizations against U.S.-based tech giants Google and Facebook. For years, news organizations in Australia have argued they should be paid when Internet companies aggregate news stories on their websites. Google and Facebook say their sites help people find news, and the resulting traffic to news websites is valuable on its own.

15 photos show how Princess Diana and Prince Charles' relationship changed over time

  15 photos show how Princess Diana and Prince Charles' relationship changed over time Their marriage faced obstacles — including Charles' relationship with Camilla-Parker Bowles — from the very beginning.

Google on Friday threatened to make its search engine unavailable in Australia if the government went ahead with plans to make tech giants “If this version of the code were to become law, it would give us no real choice but to stop making Google search available in Australia ,” Silva told senators.

Google has threatened to remove its search engine from Australia over the nation's attempt to make the tech giant share royalties with news publishers. Are you going to pull out of every market, are you? Is this about stopping the precedence?" asked Senator Rex Patrick. Ms Silva replied that the

The proposed media law would force the tech companies to negotiate with media companies on payments for previewing and linking to their content. If they can’t reach a deal, a government regulator would step in to set the rates. That arrangement is untenable, Mel Silva, the head of Google in Australia and New Zealand, said in prepared testimony released ahead of the hearing Friday.

“The principle of unrestricted linking between websites is fundamental to the web,” Silva said. “It would give us no real choice but to stop making Google Search available in Australia.”

During the hearing, Facebook representatives also reiterated a previous threat that they could block users in the country from posting news links if the law went ahead unchanged.

Additions, subtractions and updated title odds for all 30 NBA teams

  Additions, subtractions and updated title odds for all 30 NBA teams Additions, subtractions and updated title odds for all 30 NBA teams

Google has threatened to make its search engine unavailable in Australia if the government goes © Andrew Matthews The company said it would have to prevent Australians from accessing its search engine © Provided by PA Media Facebook has also spoken out against the plans (Niall Carson/PA).

Australia ‘doesn’t respond to threats ’. Google ’s threat to cut off services in Australia came just a day after it reached a content-payment deal with She said Google was willing to pay news outlets for their contributions but not under the current proposed rules, including payments for links and snippets.


Video: Google Threatens to Leave Down Under Over Proposed Media Law (TheStreet)

Facebook threatens to block news distribution in Australia

The rise of Google and Facebook has massively disrupted the news business all over the world. The steady advertising revenue newspapers relied on for decades has almost entirely gone online, and news organizations have struggled for years to adjust to the new reality, with many going out of business or severely downsizing. The proposed law is written to apply to all “digital platforms,” but Facebook and Google are specifically mentioned in the text and have been at the center of the debate.

Google says it contributes billions of dollars to the Australian economy by helping businesses reach customers, distributing Australian-built software worldwide through its app store and even saving drivers time by offering Google Maps. Around 94 percent of searches in the country go through Google, according to Australia’s competition regulator. For Google though, Australia represents only a tiny amount of its overall revenue and profit.

An overview of all lawsuits against Google - and how the group reacts

 An overview of all lawsuits against Google - and how the group reacts US authorities seem to be targeting the tech group. We explain the three procedures and add Google's comments. © t3n.de The group is currently being targeted by antitrust authorities around the globe. Within a few weeks, US prosecutors have filed three antitrust lawsuits against Google and its parent company Alphabet. Both states and the US federal government appear as plaintiffs.

Google ’s threat to blackout its search engine followed previous warnings that “all options” were on the table for its response to the proposed law. Silva’s statement also came days after Google acknowledged it was running “experiments” with its algorithm, excluding a number of Australian

The Verge reports that tech giant Google has threatened to pull its search engine out of Australia if a proposed law that would force the company to pay news publishers for their content goes into effect.

The idea that Google should pay for showing news in its search results is not new. In Spain, Google shut down its news aggregation website in 2014 after the country passed a law requiring online platforms that profit off news links to share their revenue with media companies. Just this week, Google agreed to negotiate payments to French publishers.

In the U.S., Google is facing multiple federal and state antitrust lawsuits that allege the company has used its domination of online search to benefit its other businesses and push out competitors.

Section 230: The little law that defined how the Internet works

“It seems very peculiar to me that effectively Google wants to blackmail Australian consumers and policymakers with threats to go ahead and leave this jurisdiction when these discussions are happening all around the world, including in the U.S. itself,” Australian Sen. Andrew Bragg said during the Senate hearing, which was broadcast remotely.

Google says it is willing to pay Australian publishers and encourage users to subscribe to news organizations, but on its own terms. Its proposal, known as Google News Showcase, would mean news organizations negotiate directly with Google over payments.

But the Australian law would force Google and Facebook to hand over the final decision to regulators, a situation Silva said presented “unmanageable financial and operational risk for Google.”

Facebook's news blackout: Why folks outside Australia should care .
A proposed law in Australia could be the first of many around the world."Assuming this draft code becomes law, we will reluctantly stop allowing publishers and people in Australia from sharing local and international news on Facebook and Instagram," Will Easton, who manages Facebook's Australia and New Zealand operations, said in an August blog post. "This is not our first choice -- it is our last.

usr: 0
This is interesting!