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Technology T-Mobile saw Verizon telling people to turn off 5G and thought ‘why stop there’

02:52  05 march  2021
02:52  05 march  2021 Source:   theverge.com

Verizon CEO makes the case that 5G is more than just faster phones

  Verizon CEO makes the case that 5G is more than just faster phones From drones to 3D renderings of museum exhibits, Hans Vestberg rattles off a list of ways 5G will change your life."It's more than just another tech innovation," he said at his CES 2021 keynote address on Monday. "It's a platform that makes other innovations possible.

T-Mobile has been busy hawking its 5G network, recently spending many additional billions to expand it, which makes it kinda awkward that it’s also been caught telling users to turn off 5G to save battery life (via Sascha Segan). Didn’t Verizon just make this same gaff mere days ago? It sure did. But instead of learning from the example, T-Mobile appears to have pulled a hold-my-beer: where Verizon told users to switch to LTE, many of T-Mobile’s support documents tell users to go all the way back to 2G.

text © Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

In case you’re not aware, switching to 2G (which T-Mobile handily tells you how to do) will make your phone next to useless as a data device: the maximum theoretical speed you could get from a 2G connection would be around 1Mbps (though many top out at closer to 256Kbps). Even 1Mbps is 25 times slower than what the FTC considers to be acceptable broadband speeds, and 300 times slower than the average 5G mid-band speeds T-Mobile has bragged about.

Verizon CEO pitches 5G as a 'platform' for services like drone delivery

  Verizon CEO pitches 5G as a 'platform' for services like drone delivery As 5G connectivity rolls out across the country in fits and starts, we’re still asking whether the upgrades will make for a noticeable change in our wireless connectivity. During a CES keynote, Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg (Verizon owns Engadget’s parent company) tried to make the case that 5G is “the platform that makes other innovations possible.” Verizon announced a deal between its subsidiary, Skyward and UPS Flight Forward to team up on delivery drones that use 4G LTE at first, and include testing with 5G connections later this year. In a statement, UPS CEO Carol B. Tomé said 5G will be necessary to do these kinds of deliveries at scale.

(Never mind that T-Mobile is also in the midst of phasing out 2G signals for good, though the 2G shutdown has reportedly been postponed to 2022.)

graphical user interface, text, application:  From the support page for the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G. © Screenshot: The Verge From the support page for the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G.

T-Mobile probably realized that this kind of advice was not a great look, but the company’s cover-up has also been amusingly slow. Earlier today, it removed the “Toggle from 5G/LTE to 2G” advice from the first example PC Magazine found (the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G), and the second one (the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G) had its support page updated shortly before we wrote these words. It also didn’t take long to find the advice to turn off 5G and/or 4G on the pages for the LG Wing, OnePlus Nord N10 5G, Galaxy S20+ 5G, and the Pixel 4a 5G (which weirdly only mentions turning off 4G, not 5G). That’s likely an incomplete list, but you get the picture: the nudge to pick T-Mobile’s slow 2G network showed up a bunch.

Where to buy the Samsung Galaxy S21, S21 Plus, and S21 Ultra,

  Where to buy the Samsung Galaxy S21, S21 Plus, and S21 Ultra, Starting at $799.99

(Here’s a Google Cache version of the first T-Mobile support page from March 1st.)

I will say that T-Mobile is right in one way: turning my phone down to 2G would likely make it so slow that I’d just give up trying to use it, and my phone probably would last a lot longer. If you’re struggling with battery life on your phone, there are plenty of things you can try that don’t involve slamming the brakes quite that hard.

Verizon and Amazon Web Services partner to create 5G private MEC solution .
The partnership will give enterprises a low-latency edge option with local, hybrid-cloud access to AWS software, the companies said.Verizon cites ultra-low latency, higher levels of security and deeper customization as key advantages to the new model, which it said can be used " to quickly deploy real-time enterprise applications like intelligent logistics, predictive maintenance, robotics, factory automation and more to lower costs and improve safety, precision and efficiency.

usr: 0
This is interesting!